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  1. Sebastian Alvarez Toledo (2008). Causality and Time: A Sense of Reduction. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):29-42.
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  2. Archie J. Bahm (1971). A Multiple-Aspect Theory of Time. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 2 (1/2):163-171.
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  3. Mark Balaguer (2014). Anti‐Metaphysicalism, Necessity, and Temporal Ontology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1):145-167.
    This paper argues for a certain kind of anti-metaphysicalism about the temporal ontology debate, i.e., the debate between presentists and eternalists over the existence of past and future objects. Three different kinds of anti-metaphysicalism are defined—namely, non-factualism, physical-empiricism, and trivialism. The paper argues for the disjunction of these three views. It is then argued that trivialism is false, so that either non-factualism or physical-empiricism is true. Finally, the paper ends with a discussion of whether we should endorse non-factualism or physical-empiricism. (...)
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  4. Adrian Bardon & Heather Dyke (eds.) (2013). A Companion to the Philosophy of Time. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _A Companion to the Philosophy of Time_ presents the broadest treatment of this subject yet; 32 specially commissioned articles - written by an international line-up of experts – provide an unparalleled reference work for students and specialists alike in this exciting field. The most comprehensive reference work on the philosophy of time currently available The first collection to tackle the historical development of the philosophy of time in addition to covering contemporary work Provides a tripartite approach in its organization, covering (...)
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  5. Sam Baron & Kristie Miller (forthcoming). Our Concept of Time. Philosophy and Psychology of Time.
    In this chapter we argue that our concept of time is a functional concept. We argue that our concept of time is such that time is whatever it is that plays the time role, and we spell out what we take the time role to consist in. We evaluate this proposal against a number of other analyses of our concept of time, and argue that it better explains various features of our dispositions as speakers and our practices as agents.
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  6. Samuel Baron & Kristie Miller (2015). What is Temporal Error Theory? Philosophical Studies 172 (9):2427-2444.
    Much current debate in the metaphysics of time is between A-theorists and B-theorists. Central to this debate is the assumption that time exists and that the task of metaphysics is to catalogue time’s features. Relatively little consideration has been given to an error theory about time. Since there is very little extant work on temporal error theory the goal of this paper is simply to lay the groundwork to allow future discussion of the relative merits of such a (...)
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  7. George Bernstein (1991). Using the Future, Present and Past in Teaching. Inquiry 7 (4):22-23.
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  8. Sara Bernstein (2014). Time Travel and the Movable Present. In John Keller (ed.), Being, Freedom, and Method: Themes from the Philosophy of Peter van Inwagen.
    In "Changing the Past" (2010), Peter van Inwagen argues that a time traveler can change the past without paradox in a growing block universe. After erasing the portion of past existence that generates paradox, a new, non-paradox-generating block can be "grown" after the temporal relocation of the time traveler. -/- I articulate and explore the underlying mechanism of Van Inwagen's model: the time traveler's control over the location of the objective present. Van Inwagen's model is aimed at preventing paradox by (...)
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  9. Eva Brann (2005). Are We In Time? And Other Essays on Time and Temporality. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):450-451.
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  10. Klaus Brinkmann (1995). Time and Transcendence. Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):148-150.
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  11. Robert S. Brumbaugh (1984). The Genesis and Evolution of Time. Review of Metaphysics 38 (1):121-122.
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  12. D. A. C. (1973). Our Knowledge of the Historical Past. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):149-150.
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  13. E. S. C. (1962). The Shape of Time. Review of Metaphysics 16 (1):166-166.
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  14. Antonio Calcagno (2013). Lampert, Jay., Simultaneity and Delay: A Dialectical Theory of Staggered Time. Review of Metaphysics 67 (1):173-175.
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  15. Ross Cameron, How Can You Know You 'Re Present?'.
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  16. Ross P. Cameron (2015). The Moving Spotlight: An Essay on Time and Ontology. Oxford University Press.
    Ross P. Cameron argues that the flow of time is a genuine feature of reality. He suggests that the best version of the A-Theory is a version of the Moving Spotlight view, according to which past and future beings are real, but there is nonetheless an objectively privileged present. Cameron argues that the Moving Spotlight theory should be viewed as having more in common with Presentism than with the B-Theory. Furthermore, it provides the best account of truthmakers for claims (...)
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  17. Natalja Deng (2015). How A-Theoretic Deprivationists Should Respond to Lucretius. Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (3):417-432.
    What, if anything, makes death bad for the deceased themselves? Deprivationists hold that death is bad for the deceased iff it deprives them of intrinsic goods they would have enjoyed had they lived longer. This view faces the problem that birth too seems to deprive one of goods one would have enjoyed had one been born earlier, so that it too should be bad for one. There are two main approaches to the problem. In this paper, I explore the second (...)
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  18. Natalja Deng (2015). On Whether B-Theoretic Atheists Should Fear Death. Philosophia 43 (4):1011-1021.
    In this paper I revisit a dispute between Mikel Burley and Robin Le Poidevin about whether or not the B-theory of time can give its adherents any reason to be less afraid of death. In ‘Should a B-theoretic atheist fear death?’, Burley argues that even on Le Poidevin’s understanding of the B-theory, atheists shouldn’t be comforted. His reason is that the prevalent B-theoretic account of our attitudes towards the past and future precludes treating our fear of death as unwarranted. I (...)
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  19. Steven M. Duncan, Space - Why You Just Have to Be There!
    In this paper I explore the implications of the notion of hyperspace for scientific realism and the sort of theoretical activity represented by the attempt to arrive at a literal characterization of the noumenal realities that natural science, especially physics, investigates. I conclude that whether or not this enterprise is possible, its being so depends on factors outside of our control for which no internal means of correction is possible. Only a very attenuated form of scientific realism, then, can reasonably (...)
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  20. R. Durie (ed.) (2000). Time and the Instant. Clinamen Press.
  21. M. Oreste Fiocco (2014). Becoming: Temporal, Absolute, and Atemporal. In L. Nathan Oaklander (ed.), Debates in the Metaphysics of Time. Bloomsbury 87-107.
    There are two conspicuous and inescapable features of this world in which time is real. One experiences a world in flux, a transient world in which things constantly come into existence, change and cease to be. One also experiences a stable world, one in which how things are at any given moment is permanent, unchangeable. Thus, there is transience and permanence. Yet these two features of the world seem incompatible. The primary purpose of this paper is to sketch a metaphysics (...)
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  22. Bryan Frances (forthcoming). Presentism: Foreigner-Friendly or Xenophobic? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    I argue that for all we know there are perfectly ordinary actual entities that are temporal in the usual sense and yet never present, past, or future. This epistemic fact requires us to modify the theses of presentism and eternalism. More importantly, it generates three new and quite serious objections to presentism, which I formulate and partially evaluate in this paper.
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  23. Peter Gendolla & Dietmar Schulte (eds.) (2012). Was Ist Die Zeit? Fink.
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  24. Mark D. Gossiaux (2000). Lowe, E. J. The Possibility of Metaphysics: Substance, Identity, and Time. Review of Metaphysics 54 (1):159-160.
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  25. Thomas Hall (2014). In Defense of the Compossibility of Presentism and Time Travel. Logos and Episteme 5 (2):141-159.
    In this paper I defend the compossibility of presentism and time travel from two objections. One objection is that the presentist’s model of time leaves nowhere to travel to; the second objection attempts to equate presentist time travel with suicide. After targeting some misplaced scrutiny of the first objection, I show that presentists have the resources to account for the facts that make for time travel on the traditional Lewisian view. In light of this ability, I argue that both of (...)
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  26. Andrew Holster, The Time Flow Manifesto Chapter 1 Concepts of Time Direction.
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  27. Andrea Iacona (forthcoming). On the Puzzle of the Changing Past. Philosophia:1-6.
    In the intriguing article 'The puzzle of the changing past', Barlassina and Del Prete argue that, if one grants a platitude about truth and accepts a simple story that they tell, one is forced to conclude that the past has changed. I will suggest that there is a coherent way to resist that conclusion. The platitude about truth is in fact a platitude, but the story is not exactly as they tell it.
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  28. Daisuke Kachi (2012). Serious Copula-Tensing. Interdisciplinary Ontology 5:67-73.
    M. Johnston proposed an adverbialist solution to the problem of intrinsic change for enduring things. D. Lewis interpreted it as a way of tensing the copula. In his view, it has the defect of replacing the having simpliciter of a property by the standing in a triadic relation to a property and a time, and so is threatened by Bradley’s Regress. I agree with Lewis on requiring the having a property to be non-relational, while I disagree with him on restricting (...)
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  29. Daisuke Kachi (2002). Tensed Ontology Based on Simple Partial Logic. Proceedings of Ninth International Symposium on Temporal Representation and Reasoning: TIME-02:141-145.
    Simple partial logic (=SPL) is, broadly speaking, an extensional logic which allows for the truth-value gap. First I give a system of propositional SPL by partializing classical logic, as well as extending it with several non-classical truth-functional operators. Second I show a way based on SPL to construct a system of tensed ontology, by representing tensed statements as two kinds of necessary statements in a linear model that consists of the present and future worlds. Finally I compare that way with (...)
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  30. Daisuke Kachi (1998). The Ontology of Many-Worlds : Modality and Time. In Http://Www.Bu.Edu/Wcp/MainOnto.Htm.
    There are two types of theories regarding many worlds: one is modal, while the other is temporal. The former regards reality as consisting of many possible worlds, while the latter holds that reality consists of many momentary worlds, which are usually called moments. I compare these two theories, paying close attention to the concept of transworld identity and compare trans-possible world identity with trans-momentary world identity (or transmoment identity). I characterize time from the point of many-worlds view, believing this to (...)
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  31. Baptiste Le Bihan (forthcoming). Les propriétés du vide et de l'espace-temps. Philosophiques.
    Les propriétés matérielles sont généralement appréhendées comme les propriétés d'une substance matérielle : cette chemise possède la propriété d'être bleue, cette chaussure la propriété d'être en bon état. Pourtant, on peut trouver plusieurs raisons de douter que les propriétés soient nécessairement les propriétés d'une substance matérielle, à la fois en métaphysique avec la théorie du faisceau, et en physique contemporaine à travers les notions d'énergie du vide et de champ. Or, si les propriétés ne sont pas les propriétés de substances (...)
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  32. Ken Levy (2005). Is Descartes a Temporal Atomist? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):627 – 674.
  33. Maurizio Mangiagalli (2009). Il Tempo: Fenomenologia E Metafisica. Aracne.
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  34. Claudio Mazzola (forthcoming). Still Foes: Benovsky on Relationism and Substantivalism. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-14.
    It is widely believed that relationism cannot make room for the possibility of intervals of time during which no changes occur. Benovsky has recently challenged this belief, arguing that relationists can account for the possibility of changeless time in much the same way as substantivalists do, thereby concluding that the two views are interchangeable for all theoretical purposes. This paper intends to defend the meaningfulness of the traditional dispute between substantivalists and relationists, by contending that the particular form of relationism (...)
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  35. Kris McDaniel, John M. E. Mctaggart. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy comprehensive article on J.M.E. MacTaggart, with special focus on his methodology for philosophy, his metaphysical system, and his ethics.
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  36. Paul Merriam, A Knowledge Argument for Time.
    On being released from her black-and-white room into a colorful world it would seem Mary learns something new (the Knowledge Argument). On being released from his B-theory room into an A-theory world it would seem Mark learns something new (the Temporal Knowledge Argument). These thought experiments are parallel to each other and can inform each other.
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  37. Ulrich Meyer (2011). Review of Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke, Harry Silverstein (Eds.), Time and Identity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (1).
  38. Ulrich Meyer (2011). Times as Abstractions. In Adrian Bardon (ed.), The Future of the Philosophy of Time. Routledge 41--55.
    Instead of accepting instants of time as metaphysically basic entities, many philosophers regard them as abstractions from something else. There is the Russell-Whitehead view that times are maximal classes of simultaneous events; the linguistic ersatzer's proposal that times are maximally consistent sets of sentences or propositions; and the view that times are made up of temporal parts of material objects. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these various proposals and concludes in favor of a particular version of linguistic (...)
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  39. Ulrich Meyer (2009). Review of Yuval Dolev, Time and Realism: Metaphysical and Antimetaphysical Perspectives (The MIT Press, 2007). [REVIEW] Iyyun 58:92--101.
  40. Kristie Miller (2006). Morality in a Branching Universe. Disputatio 1 (20):1 - 21.
    In most cases, we think that what settles what act it is right to perform is sensitive to what we take the facts about the world to be. But those facts include many controversial metaphysical claims about the world. I argue that depending on what metaphysical model we take to be correct, we will have very different views about what the right actions are. In particular, I argue that if a particular metaphysical model — the branching universe model — is (...)
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  41. Ryan Nefdt (2013). On the Plurality of Times: Disunified Time and the A-Series. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):249-260.
    In this paper, I investigate the nature of the metaphysical possibility of disunified time. A possibility that I argue presents unique problems for those who adhere to a strict A-theory of time, particularly those A-theorists who propose a presentist view. The first part of the paper discusses various arguments against the coherence of the concept of disunified time. I attempt to discount each of these objections and show that disunified time is indeed a possible and consistent topology of time. Then, (...)
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  42. Michael C. Rea (2003). Four-Dimensionalism. In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press 1-59.
    This article characterizes the varieties of four - dimensionalism and provides a critical overview of the main arguments in support of it.
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  43. John T. Sanders, Time From the Inside Out.
    My main objective, in this paper, is to present at least a rough sketch of a new model for understanding time. Since many people are quite content with the model that they have, it will be worth while to show why a new model might be desirable, or even necessary. As it happens, looking at the problems involved in the more usual conception of time leads one naturally to look in certain directions for solutions, and such an introduction can therefore (...)
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  44. Juan Jose Sanguineti, Tiempo. Diccionario Interdisciplinar Austral.
    En esta voz se considera el tiempo como una dimensión de la realidad física que se manifiesta en la percepción de las cosas en su devenir y cuya realidad ontológica se apoya en las transformaciones naturales. Primeramente se afronta la temática del tiempo físico y sus características en una perspectiva filosófica. Se tocan cuestiones fundamentales como el estatuto ontológico del presente/pasado/futuro, la realidad o irrealidad del instante, la simultaneidad, la unidad y pluralidad de tiempos, la dirección temporal (flecha irreversible del (...)
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  45. Theodore Sider (2004). Review: Précis of "Four-Dimensionalism". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):642-647.
    This is an overview of my book, Four-Dimensionalism. The spatiotemporal metaphysics of Russell, Smart, Quine and Lewis is a blend of separable components concerning time, persistence, mereology, and even semantics, unified by the theme that space and time are analogous: eternalism ; the reducibility of tense ; four-dimensionalism: temporal parts exist; unrestricted composition , and the "worm view" . My book defends each component except the last.
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  46. Edward Slowik (2002). Spatiotemporal Analogies: Are Space and Time Similar? Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):123-134.
    This paper investigates a famous argument, first introduced by Richard Taylor, that attempts to establish a radical similarity in the concepts of space and time. The argument contends that the spatial and temporal aspects of material bodies are much more alike, or analogous, than has been hitherto acknowledged. As will be demonstrated, most of the previous investigations of Taylor and company have failed to pinpoint the weakest link in their complex of analogies. By concentrating on their most fundamental cases, however, (...)
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  47. I. J. Thompson (1987). Two Ways of Looking at Time. Cogito 1 (1):4-6.
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  48. Vasilis Tsompanidis (2011). Tensed Belief. Dissertation, University of California Santa Barbara
    Human beings seem to capture time and the temporal properties of events and things in thought by having beliefs usually expressed with statements using tense, or notions such as ‘now’, ‘past’ or ‘future’. Tensed beliefs like these seem indispensable for correct reasoning and timely action. For instance, my belief that my root canal is over seems inexpressible with a statement that does not use tense or a temporal indexical. However, the dominant view on the nature of time is (...)
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  49. Jennifer Wang (2014). Review of Ulrich Meyer's The Nature of Time. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review 1:1.
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  50. Benjamin Victor Waters (2015). Toward a New Kalām Cosmological Argument. Cogent Arts and Humanities 2 (1).
    William Lane Craig has revived interest in the medieval kalām argument to the point where it is now one of the most discussed arguments for God’s existence in the secondary literature. Still, the reception of Craig’s argument among philosophers of religion has been mostly critical. In the interest of developing an argument that more philosophers of religion would be inclined to support, I will lay the philosophical groundwork for a new kalām cosmological argument that, in contrast with Craig’s argument, does (...)
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