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Siblings:History/traditions: Terrorism
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  1. Mariclaire Acosta (1990). State Terrorism and Its Effects on the Political Culture. Social Philosophy Today 4:375-384.
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  2. Shahrar Ali (2010). Is There a Justifiable Shoot-to-Kill Policy? In Bob Brecher, Mark Devenney & Aaron Winter (eds.), Discourses and Practices of Terrorism. Routledge.
    I begin by contending that an absolute prohibition to avoid resorting to shoot-to-kill, under any circumstances, does not adequately address the considerable negative consequences that could follow. In opening up the question for debate, I seek to alert us to the risks of moral corruption in both thought and practice, but I do not take these to be unassailable. Next, I pose a set of questions in order to interrogate unsafe assumptions and to disambiguate critical language in the shoot-to-kill scenario. (...)
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  3. Eitan Y. Alimi (2011). Relational Dynamics in Factional Adoption of Terrorist Tactics: A Comparative Perspective. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 40 (1):95-118.
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  4. Peter Alldridge & Catherine Belsey (1989). Murder Under Duress: Terrorism And The Criminal Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 2 (3):223-246.
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  5. Fritz Allhoff (2005). Terrorism and Torture. In Timothy Shanahan (ed.), International Journal of Applied Philosophy. Open Court. 121-134.
    After the events of 9/11, the concept of torture has emerged as one that is both pertinent and provoking. National polls have shown that some Americans support torture in some situations, though the majority still stand opposed. Torture has not received a tremendous amount of discussion in the philosophical literature, though I suspect that the leftward slant of academia would, for the most part, ensure limited support for torture. In this paper, I would like to first discuss why torture is (...)
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  6. Fritz Allhoff (2003). Terrorism and Torture. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):121-134.
    This paper investigates the moral permissibility of torture. After briefly considering some empirical evidence, it discusses the conflict between deontological and consequentialist approaches to torture. It is argued that, even if we are to take rights seriously, torture should at least be allowed if some conditions are satisfied. Finally, the paper discusses what those conditions should be and what sorts of torture are morally permissible.
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  7. Brenda Almond (1989). How to Define Terrorism, Jenny Teichman. Philosophy 64 (250).
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  8. Lilian Alweiss (2005). Philosophy in a Time of Terror. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):406-409.
  9. Alison G. Anderson (2003). Risk, Terrorism, and the Internet. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 16 (2):24-33.
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  10. Wayne Anderson (2003). The Eta Spain's Basque Terrorists. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  11. Elisabeth Anker (2011). Terror Firma: Political Topographies of the War on Terror. Theory and Event 14 (1).
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  12. George J. Annas (2003). Terrorism and Human Rights. In Jonathan D. Moreno (ed.), In the Wake of Terror: Medicine and Morality in a Time of Crisis. Mit Press. 33--49.
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  13. John Armitage (2003). On Ernst Jünger's 'Total Mobilization': A Re-Evaluation in the Era of the War on Terrorism. Body and Society 9 (4):191-213.
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  14. Richard Arneson, PHILOSOPHY 87 the Morality of Terrorism Spring, 2006.
    What is "terrorism"? Under what circumstances, if any, is terrorism morally acceptable? This course examines theories of just war and just warfare. The theories aim to specify under what circumstances and in what ways--in the context of waging war-- it is morally acceptable to kill people. One question that arises here is whether or not there are types of killings and threatened killings that are always wrong, whatever the consequences. Another question that arises is what it is morally permissible to (...)
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  15. Sue Ashford (1997). El terror del terrorismo. Teorema 16 (3):79-94.
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  16. Luke Ashworth & Maura Adshead (eds.) (2003). Limerick Papers in Politics and Public Administration.
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  17. Ronald M. Atlas (2009). Responsible Conduct by Life Scientists in an Age of Terrorism. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):293-301.
    The potential for dual use of research in the life sciences to be misused for harm raises a range of problems for the scientific community and policy makers. Various legal and ethical strategies are being implemented to reduce the threat of the misuse of research and knowledge in the life sciences by establishing a culture of responsible conduct.
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  18. Mathew Attumkal (2007). Terrorism: A New Mode of Dehumanizing People intoTargets'. Journal of Dharma 32 (1):73.
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  19. Servan Adar Avsar (2007). Responsive Ethics and the War Against Terrorism: A Levinasian Perspective. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3):317 – 334.
    Realist and liberal understandings of ethics as the dominant approaches to ethics in international relations are unable to respond efficiently to the call of the other in the age of war against terrorism as they revolve around the needs and the interests of the self. Such self-centred understandings of ethics cannot respond to the other ethically and respect the other in its otherness. Therefore, in this work I attempt to develop responsive ethics by drawing on Levinasian ethics which can create (...)
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  20. Alain Badiou (2006). Polemics. Verso.
    PT. 1. PHILOSOPHY AND CIRCUMSTANCES: Introduction -- Philosophy and the question of war today: 1. On September 11 2001: philosophy and the 'War against terrorism' -- 2. Fragments of a public journal on the American war against Iraq -- 3. On the war against Serbia: who strikes whom in the world today? -- The 'democratic' fetish and racism: 4. On parliamentary 'democracy': the French presidential elections of 2002 -- 5. The law on the Islamic headscarf -- 6. Daily humiliation -- (...)
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  21. Julian Baggini, Alex Voorhoeve, Catherine Audard, Saladin Meckled-Garcia & Tony McWalter (2007). Security and the 'War on Terror': A Roundtable. In Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.), What More Philosophers Think. Continuum.
    What is the appropriate legal response to terrorist threats? This question is discussed by politician Tony McWalter, The Philosophers' Magazine editor Julian Baggini, and philosophers Catherine Audard, Saladin Meckled-Garcia, and Alex Voorhoeve.
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  22. John Baker Jr (2005). Competing Paradigms of Constitutional Power in "The War on Terrorism". Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 19 (1):5-32.
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  23. S. N. Balagangadhara & Jakob de Roover (2010). The Saint, the Criminal and the Terrorist: Towards a Hypothesis on Terrorism. Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (1):1-15.
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  24. Etienne Balibar (2008). What's in a War? (Politics as War, War as Politics). Ratio Juris 21 (3):365-386.
    Abstract. This paper combines reflections on the current "state of war" in the Middle East with an epistemological discussion of the meaning and implications of the category "war" itself, in order to dissipate the confusions arising from the idea of a "War on Terror." The first part illustrates the insufficiency of the ideal type involved in dichotomies which are implicit in the naming and classifications of wars. They point nevertheless to a deeper problem which concerns the antinomic character of a (...)
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  25. Brad Bannon (2007). Terrorism and Global Response-Ability. Journal of Dharma 32 (1):47.
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  26. Bat-Ami Bar On (2003). Terrorism, Evil, and Everyday Depravity. Hypatia 18 (1):157-163.
    : This essay expresses ambivalence about the use of the term "evil" in analyses of terrorism in light of the association of the two in speeches intended to justify the United States' "war on terrorism." At the same time, the essay suggests that terrorism can be regarded as "evil" but only when considered among a multiplicity of "evils" comparable to it, for example: rape, war crimes, and repression.
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  27. Bat-Ami Bar On (2002). Terrorism and Politics. The Philosophers' Magazine (17):47-48.
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  28. Benjamin R. Barber (2003). Fear's Empire War, Terrorism, and Democracy.
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  29. A. D. Barder & F. Debrix (2011). Agonal Sovereignty: Rethinking War and Politics with Schmitt, Arendt and Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):775-793.
    The notion of biopolitical sovereignty and the theory of the state of exception are perspectives derived from Carl Schmitt’s thought and Michel Foucault’s writings that have been popularized by critical political theorists like Giorgio Agamben and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri of late. This article argues that these perspectives are not sufficient analytical points of departure for a critique of the contemporary politics of terror, violence and war marked by a growing global exploitation of bodies, tightened management of life, and (...)
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  30. Clive Barnett (2009). Violence and Publicity: Constructions of Political Responsibility After 9/11. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):353-375.
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  31. Peter Brian Barry (2013). Allhoff, Fritz. Terrorism, Ticking Time-Bombs, and Torture: A Philosophical Analysis. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):675-676.
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  32. Ananya Barua (2010). An Attempt at Understanding Terrorism From a Buddhist Perspective. Philosophy Pathways 150.
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  33. Alessandro Battistini (forthcoming). Ātaṅkavādaśataka: The Century of Verses on Terrorism by Vagish Shastri. Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.
    This paper will examine the sanskrit short-poem Āta ṅkavādaśataka written in 1988 by the famous indian pandit Vagish Shastri. Although composed in a language that is 2500 year old, the Century deals with one of the most dramatic events in contemporary indian history: sikh nationalist terrorism. The poet provides both a socio-political interpretation as well as a mythological-theological one, managing to combine a traditional approach with a pronounced ideological awareness. We will both supply information on the social and historical background (...)
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  34. Jean Baudrillard (2001). The Spirit of Terrorism. Telos 2001 (121):134-142.
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  35. Michael Baur (2005). What is Distinctive About Terrorism, and What Are the Philosophical Implications? In Timothy Shanahan (ed.), Philosophy 9/11: Thinking About the War on Terrorism. Open Court.
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  36. Saba Bazargan (2013). Proportionality, Territorial Occupation, and Enabled Terrorism. Law and Philosophy 32 (4):435-457.
    Some collateral harms affecting enemy civilians during a war are agentially mediated – for example, the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 sparked an insurgency which killed thousands of Iraqi civilians. I call these ‘collaterally enabled harms.’ Intuitively, we ought to discount the weight that these harms receive in the ‘costs’ column of our ad bellum proportionality calculation. But I argue that an occupying military force with de facto political authority has a special obligation to provide minimal protection to the (...)
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  37. Albert J. Bergesen & Omar Lizardo (2004). International Terrorism and the World-System. Sociological Theory 22 (1):38-52.
    Theories of international terrorism are reviewed. It then is noted that waves of terrorism appear in semiperipheral zones of the world-system during pulsations of globalization when the dominant state is in decline. Finally, how these and other factors might combine to suggest a model of terrorism's role in the cyclical undulations of the world-system is suggested.
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  38. Eli Berman (2009). Radical, Religious, and Violent: The New Economics of Terrorism. The Mit Press.
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  39. Jerry Berman & Lara Flint (2003). Commentary: Guiding Lights: Intelligence Oversight and Control for the Challenge of Terrorism. Criminal Justice Ethics 22 (1):2-58.
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  40. Frans A. J. Birrer (2005). Data Mining to Combat Terrorism and the Roots of Privacy Concerns. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (4):211-220.
    Recently, there has been a heavy debate in the US about the government’s use of data mining in its fight against terrorism. Privacy concerns in fact led the Congress to terminate the funding of TIA, a program for advanced information technology to be used in the combat of terrorism. The arguments put forward in this debate, more specifically those found in the main report and minority report by the TAPAC established by the Secretary of Defense to examine the TIA issue, (...)
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  41. Donald Black (2004). The Geometry of Terrorism. Sociological Theory 22 (1):14-25.
    Terrorism in its purest form is self-help by organized civilians who covertly inflict mass violence on other civilians. Pure sociology explains terrorism with its social geometry-its multidimensional location and direction in social space. Here I build on the work of Senechal de la Roche (1996) and propose the following geometrical model: Pure terrorism arises intercollectively and upwardly across long distances in multidimensional space. Yet because social distance historically corresponded to physical distance, terrorism often lacked the physical geometry necessary for its (...)
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  42. Robin Blackburn (2002). The Imperial Presidency, the War on Terrorism, and the Revolutions of Modernity. Constellations 9 (1):3-33.
    It is inherent in the concept of a terrorist act that it aims at an effect very much larger than the direct physical destruction it causes. Proponents of what used to be called the 'propaganda of the deed' also believed that in the illuminating glare of terror the vulnerability of a corrupt ...
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  43. Iason P. Blahuta (2013). Of Noncombatants in Iust War Theory and Terrorism1. In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge. 253.
  44. Louis H. Bluhm (1987). Trust, Terrorism, and Technology. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):333 - 341.
    The development of civilization implies an evolution of complex trust mechanisms which integrate the social system and form bonds which allow individuals to interact, even if they are strangers. Key elements of trust are predictability of consequences and an evaluation of consequences in terms of self-interest or values. Values, ethics, and norms enhance predictability. The terrorist introduces an unpredictable event which has negative consequences, thus destroying trust. However, terrorist-like situations occur in day-to-day activities. Technology itself makes the world more interdependent (...)
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  45. Toby Blyth (2003). Terrorism as Technology: A Discussion of the Theoretical Underpinnings. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 16 (1):45-55.
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  46. Davis B. Bobrow (2004). Losing to Terrorism: An American Work in Progress. Metaphilosophy 35 (3):345-364.
    : The evolution of the U.S. war on terrorism is on a path that poses a substantial probability of losing to it, although not necessarily of a victory by its declared targets. That conclusion follows from the definition presented of terrorism and thus central questions about the merits of responses justified by an objective of reducing it. Likely American responses to 9/11 are suggested by a review of well‐known policy‐making tendencies from past scholarship and experience, tendencies well‐established prior to 9/11 (...)
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  47. John Bolender, On Terrorism.
    At the moment, this compiled interview finds a home at Jump Arts Journal, but it will be an ongoing matter at the for-fee section of Zmag.org. Many would-be champions of Chomsky find themselves of similar political outlook, but find the professor a wee on the didactic side, as well as a media machine unto himself. I am one of these, but don’t find this to be a necessarily bad thing, believe the discussion worthy and significant, and, asJAJ deals will all (...)
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  48. Giovanna Borradori (2005). Beyond the Culture of Terrorism. Philosophy Today 49 (4):397-407.
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  49. Paul Bou-Habib (2008). Security, Profiling and Equality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (2):149 - 164.
    How, exactly, must we strike the balance between security and equality? Must we insist, out of respect for the equality of persons, that the police refrain from using ethnic profiling and opt for some other strategy in their pursuit of terrorists, or must we allow the police to continue with this policy, which seems to sacrifice equality for the sake of security? This paper assesses the ethical status of ethnic profiling from the perspective of the ideal of equality. The paper (...)
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  50. Joseph Boyle (2003). Just War Doctrine and the Military Response to Terrorism. Journal of Political Philosophy 11 (2):153-170.
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