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  1. Sara Ahmed & Jackie Stacey (2001). Testimonial Cultures: An Introduction. Cultural Values 5 (1):1-6.
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  2. Anna Akasoy (2010). Ibn Sina in the Arab West: The Testimony of an Andalusian Sufi. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 21:287-312.
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  3. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell 235-262.
  4. Ronald J. Allen (2008). Explanationism All the Way Down. Episteme 5 (3):pp. 320-328.
    The probabilistic account of juridical proof meets insurmountable problems. A better explanation of juridical proof is that it is a form of inference to the best explanation that involves the comparative plausibility of the parties’ stories. In addition, discrete evidentiary matters such as relevance and probative value are also best understood as involving inference to the best explanation rather than being probabilistic.
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  5. Ben Almassi (2009). Trust in Expert Testimony: Eddington's 1919 Eclipse Expedition and the British Response to General Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (1):57-67.
  6. Louise B. Andrew (2010). The Ethics of Expert Testimony. In G. A. van Norman, S. Jackson, S. H. Rosenbaum & S. K. Palmer (eds.), Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology. Cambridge University Press 261.
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  7. David E. Beard (2000). “Rhetorical Criticism, Holocaust Studies, and the Problem of Ethos” (A Reply to “Ethos, Witness, and Holocaust ‘Testimony’”]. JAC 20 20:949-956.
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  8. Endre Begby (2013). The Epistemology of Prejudice. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):90-99.
    According to a common view, prejudice always involves some form of epistemic culpability, i.e., a failure to respond to evidence in the appropriate way. I argue that the common view wrongfully assumes that prejudices always involve universal generalizations. After motivating the more plausible thesis that prejudices typically involve a species of generic judgment, I show that standard examples provide no grounds for positing a strong connection between prejudice and epistemic culpability. More generally, the common view fails to recognize the extent (...)
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  9. Gregor Betz, Michael Baurmann & Rainer Cramm (2013). Is Epistemic Trust of Veritistic Value? Ethics and Politics 15 (2):25-41.
    Epistemic trust figures prominently in our socio-cognitive practices. By assigning different degrees of competence to agents, we distinguish between experts and novices and determine the trustworthiness of testimony. This paper probes the claim that epistemic trust furthers our epistemic enterprise. More specifically, it assesses the veritistic value of competence attribution in an epistemic community, i.e., in a group of agents that collaboratively seek to track down the truth. The results, obtained by simulating opinion dynamics, tend to subvert the very idea (...)
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  10. Anna Blackwell (1871). The Philosophy of Existence. The Testimony of the Ages.
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  11. Maurice Blanchot & Jacques Derrida (2000). The Instant of My Death / Demeure: Fiction and Testimony. Stanford University Press.
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  12. V. Boland (2006). Truth, Knowledge and Communication: Thomas Aquinas on the Mystery of Teaching. Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (3):287-304.
    The context in which Thomas Aquinas reflects on teaching is discussed, as are the texts in which he does so. We learn how he understands teaching from two other considerations, how he went about the task, and the pedagogical concerns that persist through his writing career. The most important source for his convictions about pedagogy is the Bible, and Jesus is ‘the most excellent of teachers’. His account of teaching is ultimately theological, then, in line with his concerns in Summa (...)
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  13. Joseph A. Bracken (1987). Testimony and Intersubjectivity. Philosophy and Theology 2 (1):35-43.
    Following a brief examination of some remarks by Paul Ricoeur on the notion of testimony. I provide the outline or an analysis of revelation based upon certain key concepts of process philosophy. This is followed by a more specific interpretation within the context of Whitehead’s philosophy of process.
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  14. James Bryant (2004). The Poetics of Testimony and Blackness in the Theology of James H. Cone. Clr James Journal 10 (1):37-56.
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  15. William D. Buhrman (2011). Narrative Testimony in Kierkegaard and Rowling. Renascence 63 (4):273-286.
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  16. Christian Burgers, Anneke de Graaf & Sabine Callaars (2012). Differences in Actual Persuasiveness Between Experiential and Professional Expert Evidence. Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (2):194-208.
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  17. Ian A. Burney (2002). Testing Testimony: Toxicology and the Law of Evidence in Early Nineteenth-Century England. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):289-314.
    This essay’s principal objective is to examine how, when confronted with a case of possible criminal poisoning, early nineteenth-century English toxicologists sought to generate and to represent their evidence in the courtroom. Its contention is that in both these activities toxicologists were inextricably engaged in a complex communicative exercise. On the one hand, they distanced themselves from the instabilities of language, styling themselves as testifiers to fact alone. But at the same time, they saw themselves as deeply implicated in the (...)
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  18. Samuel Byrskog (2008). ""A" Truer" History. Reflections on Richard Bauckham, Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony. Nova et Vetera 6:483-490.
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  19. Kenneth Campbell, Stephen Banning, Hilary Fussell Sisco, Susanna Priest & Karen Taylor (2011). Reading Hurricane Katrina: Information Sources and Decision-Making in Response to a Natural Disaster. Social Epistemology 23 (3):361-380.
    In this paper we analyze results from 114 face-to-face qualitative interviews of people who had evacuated from the New Orleans area in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, interviews that were completed within weeks of the 2005 storm in most cases. Our goal was to understand the role information and knowledge played in people's decisions to leave the area. Contrary to the conventional wisdom underlying many disaster communication studies, we found that our interviewees almost always had extensive storm-related information from a (...)
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  20. J. Adam Carter & Philip J. Nickel (2014). On Testimony and Transmission. Episteme 11 (02):145-155.
    Jennifer Lackey’s case “Creationist Teacher,” in which students acquire knowledge of evolutionary theory from a teacher who does not herself believe the theory, has been discussed widely as a counterexample to so-called transmission theories of testimonial knowledge and justification. The case purports to show that a speaker need not herself have knowledge or justification in order to enable listeners to acquire knowledge or justification from her assertion. The original case has been criticized on the ground that it does not really (...)
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  21. Annamaria Carusi (2009). Implicit Trust in the Space of Reasons and Implications for Technology Design: A Response to Justine Pila. Social Epistemology 23 (1):25-43.
    In this issue, Pila (2009) has criticised the recommendations made by requirements engineers involved in the design of a grid technology for the support of distributed readings of mammograms made by Jirotka et al. (2005). The disagreement between them turns on the notion of “biographical familiarity” and whether it can be a sound basis for trust for the performances of professionals such as radiologists. In the first two sections, this paper gives an interpretation of the position of each side in (...)
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  22. Timothy Chan & Guy Kahane (2011). The Trouble with Being Sincere. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):215-234.
    Questions about sincerity play a central role in our lives. But what makes an assertion insincere? In this paper we argue that the answer to this question is not as straightforward as it has sometimes been taken to be. Until recently the dominant answer has been that a speaker makes an insincere assertion if and only if he does not believe the proposition asserted. There are, however, persuasive counterexamples to this simple account. It has been proposed instead that an insincere (...)
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  23. C. A. J. Coady (1992). Testimony: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.
    Our trust in the word of others is often dismissed as unworthy, because the illusory ideal of "autonomous knowledge" has prevailed in the debate about the nature of knowledge. Yet we are profoundly dependent on others for a vast amount of what any of us claim to know. Coady explores the nature of testimony in order to show how it might be justified as a source of knowledge, and uses the insights that he has developed to challenge certain widespread assumptions (...)
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  24. David Coady (2007). Are Conspiracy Theorists Irrational? Episteme 4 (2):193-204.
    Abstract It is widely believed that to be a conspiracy theorist is to suffer from a form of irrationality. After considering the merits and defects of a variety of accounts of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, I draw three conclusions. One, on the best definitions of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, conspiracy theorists do not deserve their reputation for irrationality. Two, there may be occasions on which we should settle for an inferior definition which (...)
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  25. David Coady (2007). Introduction: Conspiracy Theories. Episteme 4 (2):131-134.
    There has been a lively philosophical debate about the nature of conspiracy theories and their epistemic status going on for some years now. This debate has shed light, not only on conspiracy theories themselves, but also, in the process, on a variety of issues in social epistemology, political philosophy, and the philosophy of religion.
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  26. Veena Das (2007). Commentary: Trauma and Testimony: Between Law and Discipline. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 35 (3):330-335.
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  27. Douglas Walton David M. Godden (2006). Argument From Expert Opinion as Legal Evidence: Critical Questions and Admissibility Criteria of Expert Testimony in the American Legal System. Ratio Juris 19 (3):261-286.
    . While courts depend on expert opinions in reaching sound judgments, the role of the expert witness in legal proceedings is associated with a litany of problems. Perhaps most prevalent is the question of under what circumstances should testimony be admitted as expert opinion. We review the changing policies adopted by American courts in an attempt to ensure the reliability and usefulness of the scientific and technical information admitted as evidence. We argue that these admissibility criteria are best seen in (...)
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  28. Rodrigo de la Fabian (2011). On the Politico-Clinical Function of Testimony. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2).
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  29. Rodrigo de la Fabian (2011). The Political Function of Clinical Testimony. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2):115 - +.
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  30. Sinan Dogramaci (2012). Reverse Engineering Epistemic Evaluations. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (3):513-530.
    This paper begins by raising a puzzle about what function our use of the word ‘rational’ could serve. To solve the puzzle, I introduce a view I call Epistemic Communism: we use epistemic evaluations to promote coordination among our basic belief-forming rules, and the function of this is to make the acquisition of knowledge by testimony more efficient.
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  31. Charles M. Ess (2010). Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):287-305.
    I approach the philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to the more directly philosophical analyses of trust online by first offering an introductory taxonomy of diverse accounts of trust that have emerged over the past decade or so. In the face of important objections to the possibility of establishing and fostering (...)
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  32. Anna Estany & David Casacuberta (2012). Contributions of Socially Distributed Cognition to Social Epistemology: The Case of Testimony. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 16 (16):40-68.
    El objetivo de este artículo es analizar y revisar las normas que filosóficamente asociamos al proceso de testimonio, inquiriendo hasta qué puntoson0 consistentes con los conocimientos empíricos de las ciencias cognitivas.Tradicionalmente, el problema del testimonio surgía cuando, desde una epistemología de corte individualista, se suponía, siguiendo el dictum ya marcado en la Modernidad tanto por racionalistas como por empiristas, de que el conocimiento debía ser testado personalmente. Sin embargo, disciplinas y enfoques recientes, como la Cognición Socialmente Distribuida y la Epistemología (...)
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  33. Carlos Jódar Estrella (2002). La búsqueda del evento en la estructura testimonial de la Revelación Bíblica. Revista Agustiniana 43 (131):371-390.
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  34. María G. Navarro (2014). Agencia y paciencia de la utopía. [REVIEW] Isegoría 54:408-414.
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  35. Christopher Gauker (2003). Social Externalism and Linguistic Communication. In Maria J. Frapolli & E. Romero (eds.), Meaning, Basic Self-Knowledge, and Mind: Essays on Tyler Burge. CSLI
    According to the expressive theory of communication, the primary function of language is to enable speakers to convey the content of their thoughts to hearers. According to Tyler Burge's social externalism, the content of a person's thought is relative to the way words are used in his or her surrounding linguistic community. This paper argues that Burge's social externalism refutes the expressive theory of communication.
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  36. Axel Gelfert (2011). Expertise, Argumentation, and the End of Inquiry. Argumentation 25 (3):297-312.
    This paper argues that the problem of expertise calls for a rapprochement between social epistemology and argumentation theory. Social epistemology has tended to emphasise the role of expert testimony, neglecting the argumentative function of appeals to expert opinion by non-experts. The first half of the paper discusses parallels and contrasts between the two cases of direct expert testimony and appeals to expert opinion by our epistemic peers, respectively. Importantly, appeals to expert opinion need to be advertised as such, if they (...)
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  37. Axel Gelfert (2010). Kant and the Enlightenment's Contribution to Social Epistemology. Episteme 7 (1):79-99.
    The present paper argues for the relevance of Immanuel Kant and the German Enlightenment to contemporary social epistemology. Rather than distancing themselves from the alleged ‘individualism’ of Enlightenment philosophers, social epistemologists would be well-advised to look at the substantive discussion of social-epistemological questions in the works of Kant and other Enlightenment figures. After a brief rebuttal of the received view of the Enlightenment as an intrinsically individualist enterprise, this paper charts the historical trajectory of philosophical discussions of testimony as a (...)
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  38. Frances Taylor Gench (forthcoming). Book Review: Testimony: Talking Ourselves Into Being Christian. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (2):221-221.
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  39. R. W. Gifford (1997). Evidence: Oregon Court Excludes Expert Testimony in Breast Implant Litigation. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 25 (2-3):221.
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  40. Tal Golan (1999). The History of Scientific Expert Testimony in the English Courtroom. Science in Context 12 (1):7.
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  41. Ag Goldstein & Je Chance (1988). Psychologists as Experts in Eyewitness Cases-the Controversy Revisited. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):513-514.
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  42. Peter J. Graham (2013). Review of Paul Faulkner, Knowledge on Trust. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2013:n-n.
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  43. John Greco (2009). Religious Knowledge in the Context of Conflicting Testimony. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:61-76.
    An adequate account of testimonial knowledge in general explains how religious knowledge can be grounded in testimony, and even in the context of conflicting testimonial traditions. Three emerging trends in epistemology help to make that case. The first is to make a distinction between two projects of epistemology: “the project of explanation” and “the project of vindication.” The second is to emphasize a distinction between knowledge and understanding. The third is to ask what role the concept of knowledge plays in (...)
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  44. John Greco (2007). Discrimination and Testimonial Knowledge. Episteme 4 (3):335-351.
    Sanford Goldberg has called our attention to an interesting problem: How is it that young children can learn from the testimony of their caregivers (their parents, teachers, and nannies, for example) even when the children themselves are undiscriminating consumers of testimony? Part One describes the importance and scope of the problem, showing that it generalizes beyond tots and their caregivers. Part Two considers and rejects several strategies for solving the problem, including Goldberg's own. Part Three defends a solution, positing a (...)
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  45. David Greene (2005). Need for Expert Testimony to Prove Lack of Serious Artistic Value in Obscenity Cases, The. Nexus 10:171.
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  46. Rose Gummere (1939). GOLDBERG, Wonder of Words. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 33 (1):7.
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  47. William P. Gunnar (2008). Laws of Men and Laws of Nature: The History of Scientific Expert Testimony in England and America (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (4):650-655.
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  48. Patricia A. Halliday (2005). Book Review: Tales of Trauma: A Review of Leigh Gilmore's the Limits of Autobiography: Trauma and Testimony (Cornell University Press, 2001) and Janice Doane and Devon Hodges's Telling Incest: Narratives of Dangerous Remembering From Stein to Sapphire (University of Michigan Press, 2001). [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):210-213.
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  49. Robert Hambourger (1980). Belief in Miracles and Hume's Essay. Noûs 14 (4):587-604.
    IN HIS ESSAY "OF MIRACLES" HUME DERIVES THE CONCLUSION THAT TESTIMONY CANNOT PROVIDE ADEQUATE REASON TO BELIEVE IN A MIRACLE FROM TWO PRINCIPLES; A GENERAL ONE CONCERNING THE CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH TESTIMONY SHOULD BE ACCEPTED, AND THE PRINCIPLES THAT TO BE BELIEVED PROPERLY TO BE A MIRACLE, AN EVENT WOULD HAVE TO VIOLATE PRINCIPLES AS WELL ESTABLISHED AS ANY CAN BE BY INFERENCES FROM EXPERIENCE. HERE IT IS ARGUED THAT BOTH OF HUME’S PRINCIPLES ARE FALSE, AFTER WHICH A POSITIVE ACCOUNT (...)
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  50. David Robb Hampton (2003). Defining Science for the Law of Evidence: A Comprehensive Examination of the Philosophy and Law Pertaining to Scientific Testimony in Canadian Courts. Dissertation, University of Alberta (Canada)
    The purpose of this project is to examine the use of scientific testimony within Canadian courts and address the following issues: does scientific testimony pose a problem for the epistemic task of the trier of fact and, if so, what legal procedures will best meet the epistemic needs of the law? In order to answer the first question this dissertation develops an epistemology of testimony suitable for application to the courtroom environment. I argue that legal inquiry is a justificational context (...)
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