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  1. Alfred Adler (1958/1969). The Education of the Individual. New York, Greenwood Press.
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  2. Mithu Alur (2001). Some Cultural and Moral Implications of Inclusive Education in India—a Personal View. Journal of Moral Education 30 (3):287-292.
    This article provides a personal viewpoint on and outline of the author's contribution to learning disability in India. It refers to her doctoral research on policy and the status of people with disability in India. It puts forth the view that although India addresses diversity in many ways it tends to exclude people with disability from national programmes. It argues that inclusive education should be context- and culture-specific and that inclusive programmes can develop, albeit incrementally, despite the fact that systemic (...)
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  3. J. B. Annand (ed.) (1977). Education for Self-Discovery. Hodder and Stoughton.
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  4. Eric Anthamatten (2012). The Hands and Feet of the Child: Towards a Philosophy of Habilitation. Education and Culture 28 (2):26-35.
    "The problem with you, Dewey, is that you think philosophy is done with the hands rather than with the eyes.""Thank you for the compliment."1A child's curious hand: like the budding of a plant seeking nourishment from sun and soil, the hand expresses into the world so that it may give, receive, and reproduce itself: the newborn grasping for mama's breast or papa's nose, instinctually squeezing a finger that may be placed in its palm; the toddler negotiating the traumatic development of (...)
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  5. Timothy J. Bergen & Han-Fu Mi (2003). Ortega y Gasset: Education as Responsibility. Journal of Thought 38 (1):7-17.
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  6. Ralph Borsodi (1963). The Education of the Whole Man. Vallabh Vidyanagar, India, S.V. Vidyapeeth.
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  7. Tyrrell Burgess (1981). Democratic Socialism and Education. In Anthony Crosland, David Lipsey & R. L. Leonard (eds.), The Socialist Agenda: Crosland's Legacy. Cape.
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  8. H. G. Callaway (1996). Education and the Unity of the Person. Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (June):43-50.
    The deeper meaning of education, says Dewey in his Human Nature and Conduct (1922), which distinguishes the justly honored profession from that of mere trainer, is that a future new society of changed purposes and desires may be created by a deliberately humane treatment of the impulses of youth (p. 69). For Dewey, a truly humane education consists in an intelligent direction of native activities in the light of the possibilities and necessities of the social situation (p. 70). Student impulse (...)
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  9. Rosemary Chamberlin (1989). Free Children and Democratic Schools: A Philosophical Study of Liberty and Education. Falmer Press.
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  10. Michael Cholbi (2007). Intentional Learning as a Model for Philosophical Pedagogy. Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):35-58.
    The achievement of intentional learning is a powerful paradigm for the objectives and methods of the teaching of philosophy. This paradigm sees the objectives and methods of such teaching as based not simply on the mastery of content, but as rooted in attempts to shape the various affective and cognitive factors that influence students’ learning efforts. The goal of such pedagogy is to foster an intentional learning orientation, one characterized by self-awareness, active monitoring of the learning process, and a desire (...)
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  11. Young-Sam Chun (2008). Teaching Philosophy as a Tool for Helping Children Understand Problems Properly. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:23-28.
    Children are surrounded by a lot of problems here and there, and they often show any tendency to answer them promptly. In this paper, I argue that helping children understand their problems properly before answering them is one of the good ways of meta-thinking teaching in philosophy for children, and then I suggest how teachers help them do so.
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  12. Vincent Colapietro (2013). Neglected Facets of Peirce's 'Speculative' Rhetoric. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (7):712-736.
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  13. Stefaan E. Cuypers (2012). R.S. Peters' 'The Justification of Education' Revisited. Ethics and Education 7 (1):3 - 17.
    In his 1973 paper ?The Justification of Education? R.S. Peters aspired to give a non-instrumental justification of education. Ever since, his so-called ?transcendental argument? has been under attack and most critics conclude that it does not work. They have, however, thrown the baby away with the bathwater, when they furthermore concluded that Peters? justificatory project itself is futile. This article takes another look at Peters? justificatory project. As against a Kantian interpretation, it proposes an axiological-perfectionist interpretation to bring out the (...)
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  14. Andreas Dorschel (2010). Die Idee des Konservatoriums. In Laurenz Lütteken (ed.), Mendelssohns Welten. Bärenreiter. 89-108.
  15. Andreas Dorschel (1992). Das Programm ästhetischer Erziehung bei Schiller und beim frühen Nietzsche. Vierteljahrsschrift Für Wissenschaftliche Pädagogik 68 (3):260-284.
  16. John Dowd (2010). Toward an Ethics of Education. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (2):68-79.
    This paper utilizes Foucault to offer a preliminary sketch and critique of an instrumentalist mentalite within higher education. Part one tackles some of the socio-historical issues pertaining to American universities. Here, I address questions of liberal learning and offer them as important distinctions from more narrow, curriculum-based focuses on skill-sets and workforce training. Part two provides an ethical foundation for the study of colleges and universities. Both instrumental and ethical perspectives on education are considered. Instmmental approaches appear within the discourse (...)
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  17. Shawn Floyd (2010). Education as Soulcraft: Exemplary Intellectual Practice and the Cardinal Virtues. Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (3):249-266.
    Gilbert Meilaender argues that universities should eschew efforts to improve students’ moral character. I show that Meilaender’s arguments fail to offer any cogent reason for shunning university-based moral education. I then look to Thomas Aquinas in order to explain the connection between moral virtue and the practices common in university life. Using Aquinas as a guide, I argue that exemplary intellectual practice requires virtues that are subsidiary habits of the cardinal moral virtues themselves. The implication of this argument is as (...)
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  18. Sarah Galloway (2012). Reconsidering Emancipatory Education: Staging a Conversation Between Paulo Freire and Jacques Rancière. Educational Theory 62 (2):163-184.
    In this essay Sarah Galloway considers emancipation as a purpose for education through examining the theories of Paulo Freire and Jacques Rancière. Both theorists are concerned with the prospect of distinguishing between education that might socialize people into what is taken to be an inherently oppressive society and education with emancipation as its purpose. Galloway reconstructs the theories in parallel, examining the assumptions made, the processes of oppression described, and the movements to emancipation depicted. In so doing, she argues that (...)
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  19. Peter Garik & Yann Benétreau-Dupin (2014). Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on 'How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?'. Science and Education 23 (9):1853-1873.
    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 (...)
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  20. Dakmara Georgescu (2008). Philosophical “Paradigms” of Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:43-55.
    The paper explores the links between philosophy and learning with a view to highlight some of the today’s most influential philosophical “paradigms” of education. The concepts of “paradigm” and “philosophical paradigm of education” are discussed – and nuanced - based on some explicit references to them in the current philosophical and pedagogical literature. While taking into account all the different ways in which philosophy may be inquired with regard to its influence on education, the paper focuses merely on philosophical contributions (...)
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  21. Tal Gilead (2012). Education and the Logic of Economic Progress. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (1):113-131.
    Over the last few decades, the idea that education should function to promote economic progress has played a major role in shaping educational policy. So far, however, philosophers of education have shown relatively little interest in analysing this notion and its implications. The present article critically examines, from a philosophical perspective, the link between education and the currently prevailing understanding of economic progress, which is grounded in human capital theory. A number of familiar philosophical objections to the idea that economic (...)
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  22. Tal Gilead (2012). Rousseau, Happiness, and the Economic Approach to Education. Educational Theory 62 (3):267-285.
    Since the 1960s, the influence of economic thought on education has been steadily increasing. Taking Jean-Jacques Rousseau's educational thought as a point of departure, Tal Gilead critically inquires into the philosophical foundations of what can be termed the economic approach to education. Gilead's focus in this essay is on happiness and the role that education should play in promoting it. The first two parts of the essay provide an introduction to Rousseau's conception of happiness, followed by an examination of the (...)
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  23. Sanford Goldberg (2013). Epistemic Dependence in Testimonial Belief, in the Classroom and Beyond. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):168-186.
    The process of education, and in particular that involving very young children, often involves students' taking their teachers' word on a good many things. At the same time, good education at every level ought to inculcate, develop, and support students' ability to think for themselves. While these two features of education need not be regarded as contradictory, it is not clear how they relate to one another, nor is it clear how (when taken together) these features ought to bear on (...)
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  24. Vadim Grekhnev (2006). Philosophy Solving the Problems of Education in the Modern World. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:45-50.
    This paper deals with an analysis of philosophy as intellectual therapeutics for educational (pedagogical) activity. Two interrelated issues are examined: (1) philosophy's role in the construction of cognitive attitudes to all systems of education; (2) philosophy's role in the formation of a definite value attitude to education. A great deal of attention is devoted to the problem of educational goals. It is argued that the assumed dichotomy of the social and the individual (which still occurs in our teaching practice and (...)
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  25. Morwenna Griffiths (2013). Re-Thinking the Relevance of Philosophy of Education for Educational Policy Making. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-14.
  26. Amy Gutmann (2009). Educating for Individual Freedom and Democratic Citizenship : In Unity and Diversity There is Strength. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.
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  27. Bonna Devora Haberman (1994). What is the Content of Education in a Democratic Society? Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (2):183–190.
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  28. Ishtiyaque Haji & Stefaan E. Cuypers (2011). Ultimate Educational Aims, Overridingness, and Personal Well-Being. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):543-556.
    Discussion regarding education’s aims, especially its ultimate aims, is a key topic in the philosophy of education. These aims or values play a pivotal role in regulating and structuring moral and other types of normative education. We outline two plausible strategies to identify and justify education’s ultimate aims. The first associates these aims with a normative standpoint, such as the moral, prudential, or aesthetic, which is overriding, in a sense of ‘overriding’ to be explained. The second associates education’s ultimate aims (...)
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  29. Mark Halstead (1995). Voluntary Apartheid? Problems of Schooling for Religious and Other Minorities in Democratic Societies. Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (2):257–272.
  30. Valerie Harwood & Mary Lou Rasmussen (2013). Practising Critique, Attending to Truth: The Pedagogy of Discriminatory Speech. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (8):874-884.
  31. Atli Harðarson (2012). Why the Aims of Education Cannot Be Settled. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):223-235.
    The dominant model of curriculum design in the last century assumed that school education could be organized around aims, defined primarily in terms of students' behaviour. The credentials of this model were questioned by, among others, Lawrence Stenhouse, who pointed out that education serves purposes that cannot be stated in terms of behavioural objectives. In this article, I offer support for Stenhouse's conclusion and go beyond it, showing that if education aims at critical understanding of its own value, then it (...)
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  32. Erol Inelmen (2006). Genealogy of a Pursuit for Education Reform. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:57-64.
    Sweeping changes in technology followed by political, social and economic transformation are modifying the expectations from education. There is urgent need for reforms in the aim, content and method of education systems. Evidence is gathered to justify this need and suggest a process that will lead to the desired reform. We argue that character education is a requirement in order to ensure that changes move in the direction envisaged. Empowerment of the parties involved will change the mood of silence and (...)
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  33. Troy Jollimore & Sharon Barrios (2006). Creating Cosmopolitans: The Case for Literature. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (5-6):363-383.
    A cosmopolitan education must help us identify with those who are unlike us. In Martha Nussbaum’s words, students must learn “enough to recognize common aims, aspirations, and values, and enough about these common ends to see how variously they are instantiated in the many cultures and their histories.” It is commonly thought that reading serious literature will play a significant role in this process. However, this claim is challenged by theorists we call sentimentalists, who claim that the goals of cosmopolitan (...)
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  34. Morimichi Kato (2008). Horizons of Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:123-129.
    The aim of this presentation is to show that philosophy of education must seriously engage itself with horizons of education. After a brief explanation of the term “horizon”, the horizon of modern pedagogy, which was inaugurated by Pestalozzi and Herbart, is examined. Modern pedagogy with its special emphasis on method unravels itself as one of the major streams of modern epistemology, for which inspection of inner ideas is crucial. The modern epistemology, on the other hand, presupposes the atomistic self represented (...)
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  35. Sean D. Kelly, The Purpose of General Education.
    I would like to begin by talking about General Education in America. General Education plays a very particular and interesting role in American Higher Education. A typical undergraduate at one of our colleges or universities is expected to satisfy a range of requirements in his or her major area of study (mathematics, economics, philosophy, etc.); and they will also take a range of electives – courses that are not required for graduation but in which the student might want to explore (...)
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  36. William Heard Kilpatrick (1949). Modern Education: And its Proper Work. New York, Pub. For the John Dewey Society in Co-Operation with the American Education Fellowship [by] Hinds, Hayden & Eldredge.
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  37. Matereke Kudzai (2011). ‘Whipping Into Line’: The Dual Crisis of Education and Citizenship in Postcolonial Zimbabwe. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (Special Issue 2):84-99.
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  38. Lawrence Lengbeyer (1990). The Problem with Highlighters. Academic Questions 3 (3):65-70.
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  39. Jacques Maritain (1962). The Education of Man. Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday.
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  40. Bruce Maxwell & Guillaume Beaulac (2013). The Concept of the Moral Domain in Moral Foundations Theory and Cognitive Developmental Theory: Horses for Courses? Journal of Moral Education 42 (3):360-382.
    Moral foundations theory chastises cognitive developmental theory for having foisted on moral psychology a restrictive conception of the moral domain which involves arbitrarily elevating the values of justice and caring. The account of this negative influence on moral psychology, referred to in the moral foundations theory literature as the ?great narrowing?, involves several interrelated claims concerning the scope of the moral domain construct in cognitive moral developmentalism, the procedure by which it was initially elaborated, its empirical grounds and the influence (...)
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  41. Nicholas Maxwell, Text of TEDxUCL Talk: The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution.
    We urgently need to bring about a revolution in academic inquiry so that the basic aim becomes, not just knowledge, but rather wisdom, construed to be the capacity and active endeavour to realize what is of value in life for oneself and others, wisdom thus including knowledge and technological know-how, but much else besides. A basic task of academia ought to be to help humanity learn how to make progress towards as good a world as possible.
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  42. Nicholas Maxwell (2007). From Knowledge to Wisdom: The Need for an Academic Revolution. London Review of Education 5:97-115.
    At present the basic intellectual aim of academic inquiry is to improve knowledge. Much of the structure, the whole character, of academic inquiry, in universities all over the world, is shaped by the adoption of this as the basic intellectual aim. But, judged from the standpoint of making a contribution to human welfare, academic inquiry of this type is damagingly irrational. Three of four of the most elementary rules of rational problem-solving are violated. A revolution in the aims and methods (...)
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  43. Nicholas Maxwell (2005). Philosophy Seminars for Five-Year-Olds,. Learning for Democracy 1 (2):71-77.
    We need a revolution in education, from five year olds onwards, so that exploration of problems is at the heart of the enterprise.
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  44. Nicholas Maxwell (2004). Is Science Neurotic? Imperial College Press.
    Is Science Neurotic? sets out to show that science suffers from a damaging but rarely noticed methodological disease — “rationalistic neurosis.” Assumptions concerning metaphysics, human value and politics, implicit in the aims of science, are repressed, and the malaise has spread to affect the whole academic enterprise, with the potential for extraordinarily damaging long-term consequences. The book begins with a discussion of the aims and methods of natural science, and moves on to discuss social science, philosophy, education, psychoanalytic theory and (...)
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  45. Nicholas Maxwell (2003). Two Great Problems of Learning. Teaching in Higher Education, 8 (January):129-134.
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: learning about the universe, and learning how to live wisely. The first problem was solved with the creation of modern science, but the second problem has not been solved. This combination puts humanity into a situation of unprecedented danger. In order to solve the second problem we need to learn from our solution to the first problem. This requires that we bring about a revolution in the overall aims and methods of academic inquiry, (...)
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  46. Nicholas Maxwell (1991). How Can We Build a Better World? In J. Mittelstrass (ed.), Einheit der Wissenschaften: Internationales Kolloquium der Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 25-27 June 1990. Walter de Gruyter.
    In order to make progress with solving our grave global problems we need to bring about a revolution in academia so that problems of living are given intellectual priority, and the basic intellectual aim becomes to seek and promote wisdom, and not just acquire knowledge.
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  47. Thaddeus Metz (2015). How the West Was One: The Western as Individualist, the African as Communitarian. Educational Philosophy and Theory 47.
    There is a kernel of truth in the claim that Western, and especially Anglo-American-Australasian, normative philosophy, including that relating to the philosophy of education, is individualistic; it tends to prize properties that are internal to a human being such as her autonomy, rationality, pleasure, desires, self-esteem, self-realization and virtues relating to, say, her intellect. One notable exception is the idea that students ought to be educated in order to be (world) citizens, participants in a democratic and cosmopolitan order, but, compared (...)
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  48. Thaddeus Metz (2013). Philosophy of Higher Education. In Duncan Pritchard (ed.), Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    A lengthy annotated bibliography of the most central work from the past 25 years on various aspects of the philosophy of higher education.
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  49. Thaddeus Metz (2013). A Dilemma About the Final Ends of Higher Education -- And a Resolution. Kagisano (The Higher Education Discussion Series) 9:23-41.
    In this article, written for the generally educated reader, I summarize my latest thinking about a dilemma that I believe current theoretical reflection faces about the proper ultimate aims of a public university. Specifically, I make the following three major points: (1) On the one hand, all dominant theories of how properly to spend public resources entail that academics should not pursue knowledge for its own sake and should rather devote their energies toward promoting some concrete public good (such as (...)
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  50. Thaddeus Metz (2010). A Dilemma Regarding Academic Freedom and Public Accountability in Higher Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (4):529-549.
    The aim of this article is to establish that current thought about the point of a publicly funded university faces a dilemma. On the one hand, influential and attractive ‘macro’-level principles about how state resources ought to be accountably used entail that academic freedom should be utilised solely for the sake of social justice or some other concrete public good. Standard theories of public morality entail that an academic’s responsibility is entirely to be ‘responsive’ or ‘relevant’ to her social context (...)
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