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  1. Fred Adams (2003). Semantic Paralysis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):666-667.
    I challenge Jackendoff's claim that semantics should not be paralyzed by a failure to solve Brentano's problem of intentionality. I argue that his account of semantics is in fact paralyzed because it fails to live up to his own standards of naturalization, has no account of falsity, and gives the wrong semantic objects for words and thoughts.
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  2. B. Armour-Garb (2010). Horwichian Minimalism and the Generalization Problem. Analysis 70 (4):693-703.
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  3. Aude Bandini (2011). Meaning and the Emergence of Normativity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (3):415-431.
    Linguistic meaning has an essential normative dimension that prima facie cannot be reduced to descriptive, non-normative, terms. Taking this point for granted, this paper however aims at proposing a naturalist view of semantics - inspired by Wilfrid Sellars' original works - focused on the way the constitutive normative aspects of meaning might be properly explained and accounted for, rather than eliminated.
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  4. Dorit Bar-On, Natural Semantic Facts - Between Eliminativism and Hyper-Realism.
    i. Introduction: Naturaiizing Semantics It seems as though everyone these days is in the business of ‘naituraIizing': apistamologists, philosophers of mind and language, even moral phi- `lcscpheers and philosophers of mathematics. Quine is cften cited as the one who started Et, but expressions of the naturalizing urge can no doubt be found much earlier in the history of phiioscphy. Lccsaly speaking, the- naturalizing urge is the desire to fashion human epistemic achievements in particular arcs after the achievements of the natural (...)
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  5. Charles A. Baylis (1944). Critical Comments on the "Symposium on Meaning and Truth". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (1):80-93.
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  6. A. Cornelius Benjamin (1937). The Meaning of Meaning. Philosophy of Science 4 (2):282.
    The term qittīer designates the act of burning the food offerings, the 'iššîm, within the ritual sequence of all three types of sacrifice, the zébach, the ōlāh, and the minchāh. Incense is not an 'iššeh substance and is never associated with this piel conjugation. Qittēr appears to have been limited to intransitive use, while the synonyms hiqtîr and heelāh were used predominantly in transitive constructions. By the exilic or post-exilic period, hiqtîr seems to have become the preferred form for intransitive (...)
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  7. Jonathan Bennett (1975). Stimulus, Response, Meaning. American Philosophical Quarterly 9:55-88.
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  8. Paul A. Boghossian (2005). Rules, Meaning and Intention – Discussion. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 124 (2):185 - 197.
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  9. Steffen Borge (2014). Horwich on Natural and Non-Natural Meaning. Acta Analytica 29 (2):229-253.
    Paul Horwich’s Use Theory of Meaning (UTM) depends on his rejection of Paul Grice’s distinction between natural and non-natural meaning and his Univocality of Meaning Thesis, as he wishes to deflate the meaning-relation to usage. Horwich’s programme of deflating the meaning-relation (i.e. how words, sentences, etc., acquire meaning) to some basic regularity of usage cannot be carried through if the meaning-relation depends on the minds of users. Here, I first give a somewhat detailed account of the distinction between natural and (...)
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  10. J. Campbell, M. O. Rourke & David Shier (eds.) (2001). Meaning and Truth. New York: Seven Bridges Press.
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  11. Robyn Carston, Introduction: Representation and Metarepresentation.
    “Utterances and thoughts have content: They represent (actual or imaginary) states of affairs.” This is the opening statement of François Recanati’s most sustained work on kinds of representation, Oratio Obliqua, Oratio Recta (2000) and it presents the core phenomenon which it is the task of the philosophy of language to explain. A primary function of language and thought, though not their only function, is to represent how things are or might be. As well as descriptively representing entities, properties, and states (...)
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  12. Alan Carter (1991). The Real Meaning of Meaning. Heythrop Journal 32 (3):355–368.
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  13. Roderick M. Chisholm (1955). A Note on Carnap's Meaning Analysis. Philosophical Studies 6 (6):87-88.
  14. Daniel Cohnitz & Jaan Kangilaski (2013). Understanding a Sentence Does Not Entail Knowing its Truth‐Conditions: Why the Epistemological Determination Argument Fails. Dialectica 67 (2):223-242.
    The determination argument is supposed to show that a sentence's meaning is at least a truth-condition. This argument is supposed to rest on innocent premises that even a deflationist about truth can accept. The argument comes in two versions: one is metaphysical and the other is epistemological. In this paper we will focus on the epistemological version. We will argue that the apparently innocent first premise of that version of the argument is not as innocent as it seems. If the (...)
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  15. Cesare Cozzo (1994). Meaning and Argument. A Theory of Meaning Centred on Immediate Argumental Role. Almqvist & Wiksell.
    This study presents and develops in detail (a new version of) the argumental conception of meaning. The two basic principles of the argumental conception of meaning are: i) To know (implicitly) the sense of a word is to know (implicitly) all the argumentation rules concerning that word; ii) To know the sense of a sentence is to know the syntactic structure of that sentence and to know the senses of the words occurring in it. The sense of a sentence is (...)
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  16. Donald Davidson (2010). Truth and Meaning. In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Arguing About Language. Routledge. 304 - 323.
  17. Martin Davies (1981). Meaning, Structure and Understanding. Synthese 48 (1):135 - 161.
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  18. Steven Davis (1998). Grice on Natural and Non-Natural Meaning. Philosophia 26 (3-4):405-419.
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  19. Wayne A. Davis (2005). Nondescriptive Meaning and Reference: An Ideational Semantics. Oxford University Press.
    Wayne Davis presents a highly original approach to the foundations of semantics, showing how the so-called "expression" theory of meaning can handle names and other problematic cases of nondescriptive meaning. The fact that thoughts have parts ("ideas" or "concepts") is fundamental: Davis argues that like other unstructured words, names mean what they do because they are conventionally used to express atomic or basic ideas. In the process he shows that many pillars of contemporary philosophical semantics, from twin earth arguments to (...)
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  20. Michael Devitt (2001). A Shocking Idea About Meaning. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 55 (218):471-494.
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  21. Michael Devitt (1994). The Methodology of Naturalistic Semantics. Journal of Philosophy 91 (10):545-72.
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  22. Julian Dodd (1997). On a Davidsonian Objection to Minimalism. Analysis 57 (4):267–272.
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  23. Paul Ernest (1990). The Meaning of Mathematical Expressions: Does Philosophy Shed Any Light on Psychology? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (4):443-460.
    Mathematicians and physical scientists depend heavily on the formal symbolism of mathematics in order to express and develop their theories. For this and other reasons the last hundred years has seen a growing interest in the nature of formal language and the way it expresses meaning; particularly the objective, shared aspect of meaning as opposed to subjective, personal aspects. This dichotomy suggests the question: do the objective philosophical theories of meaning offer concepts which can be applied in psychological theories of (...)
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  24. Kit Fine (2010). Comments on Paul Hovda's 'Semantics as Information About Semantics Values'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (2):511-518.
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  25. Eugen Fischer (1997). On the Very Idea of a Theory of Meaning for a Natural Language. Synthese 111 (1):1-8.
    A certain orthodoxy has it that understanding is essentially computational: that information about what a sentence means is something that may be generated by means of a derivational process from information about the significance of the sentences constituent parts and of the ways in which they are put together. And that it is therefore fruitful to study formal theories acceptable as compositional theories of meaning for natural languages: theories that deliver for each sentence of their object-language a theorem acceptable as (...)
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  26. Luciano Floridi (2012). Semantic Information and the Network Theory of Account. Synthese 184 (3):431-454.
    The article addresses the problem of how semantic information can be upgraded to knowledge. The introductory section explains the technical terminology and the relevant background. Section 2 argues that, for semantic information to be upgraded to knowledge, it is necessary and sufficient to be embedded in a network of questions and answers that correctly accounts for it. Section 3 shows that an information flow network of type A fulfils such a requirement, by warranting that the erotetic deficit, characterising the target (...)
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  27. Viktor E. Frankl (1974). What is Meant by Meaning. [New York,J. Norton Publishers.
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  28. Haim Gaifman (1996). Is the "Bottom-Up" Approach From the Theory of Meaning to Metaphysics Possible? Journal of Philosophy 93 (8):373-407.
    Dummett’s The Logical Foundations of Metaphysics (LFM) outlines an ambitious project that has been at the core of his work during the last forty years. The project is built around a particular conception of the theory of meaning (or philosophy of language), according to which such a theory should constitute the corner stone of philosophy and, in particular, provide answers to various metaphysical questions. The present paper is intended as a critical evaluation of some of the main features of that (...)
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  29. Richard T. Garner (1974). Grice and MacKay on Meaning. Mind 83 (331):417-421.
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  30. Allan Gibbard (2008). Review: Horwich on Meaning. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):141-166.
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  31. Hannah Ginsborg (2011). Inside and Outside Language: Stroud's Nonreductionism About Meaning. In Jason Bridges, Niko Kolodny & Wai-Hung Wong (eds.), The Possibility of Philosophical Understanding: Essays for Barry Stroud. Oxford University Press.
    I argue that Stroud's nonreductionism about meaning is insufficiently motivated. First, given that he rejects the assumption that grasp of an expression's meaning guides or instructs us in its use, he has no reason to accept Kripke's arguments against dispositionalism or related reductive views. Second, his argument that reductive views are impossible because they attempt to explain language “from outside” rests on an equivocation between two senses in which an explanation of language can be from outside language. I offer a (...)
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  32. John Haglund & Johan Blomberg (2010). The Meaning-Sharing Network. Hortues Semioticus 6:17-30.
    We advocate an analysis of meaning that departs from the pragmatic slogan that “meaning is use”. However, in order to avoid common missteps, this claim is in dire need of qualification. We argue that linguistic meaning does not originate from language use as such; therefore we cannot base a theory of meaning only on use. It is important not to neglect the fact that language is ultimately reliant on non-linguistic factors. This might seem to oppose the aforementioned slogan, but it (...)
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  33. Everett W. Hall (1928). The Meaning of Meaning in Hollingworth's the Psychology of Thought. Journal of Philosophy 25 (15):393-403.
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  34. Gilbert Harman, Quine's Semantic Relativity.
    Philosophers sometimes approach meaning metaphorically, for example, by speaking of “grasping” meanings, as if understanding consists in getting mental hands around something.1 Philosophers say that a theory of meaning should be a theory about the meanings that people assign to expressions in their language, that to understand other people requires identifying the meanings they associate with what they are saying, and that to translate an expression of another language into your own is to find an expression in your language with (...)
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  35. Jussi Haukioja (2005). A Middle Position Between Meaning Finitism and Meaning Platonism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (1):35 – 51.
    David Bloor and Crispin Wright have argued, independently, that the proper lesson to draw from Wittgenstein's so-called rule-following considerations is the rejection of meaning Platonism. According to Platonism, the meaningfulness of a general term is constituted by its connection with an abstract entity, the (possibly) infinite extension of which is determined independently of our classificatory practices. Having rejected Platonism, both Bloor and Wright are driven to meaning finitism, the view that the question of whether a meaningful term correctly applies to (...)
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  36. Jeffrey Hershfield (2001). The Deflationary Theory of Meaning. Philosophia 28 (1-4):191-208.
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  37. Jakob Hohwy (2006). Internalized Meaning Factualism. Philosophia 34 (3):325-336..
    The normative character of meaning creates deep problems for the attempt to give a reductive explanation of the constitution of meaning. I identify and critically examine an increasingly popular Carnap-style position, which I call Internalized Meaning Factualism (versions of which I argue are defended by, e.g., Robert Brandom, Paul Horwich and Huw Price), that promises to solve the problems. According to this position, the problem of meaning can be solved by prohibiting an external perspective on meaning constituting properties. The idea (...)
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  38. Terry Horgan & George Graham (2012). Phenomenal Intentionality and Content Determinacy. In Richard Schantz (ed.), Prospects for Meaning. De Gruyter.
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  39. Jennifer Hornsby & Guy Longworth (eds.) (2006). Reading Philosophy of Language: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. Blackwell Pub..
    Designed for readers new to the subject, Reading Philosophy of Language presents key texts in the philosophy of language together with helpful editorial guidance. A concise collection of key texts in the philosophy of language Ideal for readers new to the subject. Features seminal texts by leading figures in the field, such as Austin, Chomsky, Davidson, Dummett and Searle. Presents three texts on each of five key topics: speech and performance; meaning and truth; knowledge of language; meaning and compositionality; and (...)
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  40. Paul Horwich (1994). What is It Like to Be a Deflationary Theory of Meaning? Philosophical Issues 5:133-154.
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  41. Paul J. M. Jorion (2000). The Elementary Units of Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):483-484.
    Examining the implications of a localist model for linguistic performance, I show the strengths of the P-graph, a network of elementary units of meaning where utterance results from relaxation through the operation of a dynamics of affect values. A unit of meaning is stored in a synaptic connection that brings together two words. Such a model, consistent with the anatomy and physiology of the neural tissue, eschews a number of traditional pitfalls of “semantic networks”: (1) ambiguity ceases to be an (...)
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  42. Lawrence J. Kaye (1995). A Scientific Psychologistic Foundation for Theories of Meaning. Minds and Machines 5 (2):187-206.
    I propose, develop and defend the view that theories of meaning — for instance, a theory specifying the logical form or truth conditions of natural language sentences — should be naturalized to scientific psychological inquiry. This involves both psychologism — the claim that semantics characterizes psychological states — and scientific naturalism — the claim that semantics will depend on the data and theories of scientific psychology. I argue that scientific psychologism is more plausible than the traditional alternative, the view that (...)
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  43. Gary Kemp (1998). Meaning and Truth-Conditions. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):483-493.
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  44. Jeffrey Ketland (2005). Review of Paul Horwich, From a Deflationary Point of View. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
  45. Gyula Klima, Via Antiqua Vs. Via Moderna Semantics: Two Ways of Constructing Semantic Theory.
    1st GPMR Workshop on Logic and Semantics: Medieval Logic and Modern Applied Logic, Reinische Friedrich Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Germany, 2007.
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  46. Angelika Kratzer, Situations in Natural Language Semantics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Situation semantics was developed as an alternative to possible worlds semantics. In situation semantics, linguistic expressions are evaluated with respect to partial, rather than complete, worlds. There is no consensus about what situations are, just as there is no consensus about what possible worlds or events are. According to some, situations are structured entities consisting of relations and individuals standing in those relations. According to others, situations are particulars. In spite of unresolved foundational issues, the partiality provided by situation semantics (...)
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  47. Ernest Lepore, Truth Conditional Semantics and Meaning.
  48. Wang Lu (2008). Theories of Meaning. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):83-98.
    Research into logical syntax provides us the knowledge of the structure of sentences, while logical semantics provides a window into uncovering the truth of sentences. Therefore, it is natural to make sentences and truth the central concern when one deals with the theory of meaning logically. Although their theories of meaning differ greatly, both Michael Dummett’s theory and Donald Davidson’s theory are concerned with sentences and truth and developed in terms of truth. Logical theories and methods first introduced by G. (...)
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  49. David Macarthur (2007). Review of Paul Horwich, Reflections on Meaning. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).
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  50. Robert L. Martin (1974). Relative Truth and Semantic Categories. Journal of Philosophical Logic 3 (1/2):149 - 153.
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