About this topic
Summary It is perhaps universally accepted that toleration is very important.  But what is toleration?  The pieces included here all offer something about how to best understand the concept.  The importance of this project should not be underestimated given that without a well-worked out conception of toleration, claiming we should tolerate rings somewhat hollow.  In the past, for example, people argued that we tolerate religions that compete with the state religion even if we tax them while we do not tax the state religion.  For most political philosophers today, this is a deficient understanding of the concept.
  Show all references
Related categories
Siblings:
82 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 82
  1. Joseph Agassi, Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom: Popper's Popular Critics.
    Two suggestions are at the back of the present talk. First, toleration is obligatory, not criticism. So do not try to make people critically-minded: do not force them in any way to try to offer or accept criticism, to learn to participate effectively in the game of critical discussion. If they refuse, then they are within their right. Also, they will easily ad vance excuses for their refusal; admittedly some of these are unreasonable, but not all. Instead of trying to (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. K. C. Anyanwu (1985). Cultural Philosophy as a Philosophy of Integration and Tolerance. International Philosophical Quarterly 25 (3):271-287.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bernard Bourgeois (2000). Philosophie Et Tolérance. Philosophica 65 (1):55-63.
  4. L. Bretherton (2004). Tolerance, Education and Hospitality: A Theological Proposal. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (1):80-103.
    This article gives a critique of the notion of tolerance and the promotion of tolerance in education as a means of fostering respect for the ‘other’. In its place the theologically specified notion of hospitality is proposed. In the process of doing this, the article addresses three questions: is there an inherent contradiction between liberal philosophies of education and the promotion of tolerance? Is tolerance the best way to enable genuine respect for the ‘other’? And is tolerance something Christians should (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Walker Brian (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1).
  6. Ian Carter (2013). Are Toleration and Respect Compatible? Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):195-208.
    Toleration and respect are often thought of as compatible, and indeed complementary, liberal democratic ideals. However, it has sometimes been said that toleration is disrespectful, because it necessarily involves a negative evaluation of the object of toleration. This article shows how toleration and respect are compatible as long as ‘respect’ is taken to mean (what some moral philosophers have called) recognition respect, as opposed to appraisal respect. But it also argues that recognition respect itself rules out certain kinds of evaluation (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ian Carter & Maria Paola Ferretti (2013). Introduction. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):191-194.
    In attempting to clarify both the concept of toleration and its role in contemporary society several authors have interpreted it as based on the notion of respect for persons. Persons are due respect as moral agents and as such should be allowed to make their own choices, even if the content of those choices meets with our disapproval. According to a classical understanding of toleration, one can be said to tolerate something if one disapproves of it (this is commonly called (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Dario Castiglione & Catriona McKinnon (2001). Introduction: Beyond Toleration? Res Publica 7 (3):223-230.
    Although tolerance is widely regarded as a virtue of both individuals and groups that modern democratic and multiculturalist societies cannot do without, there is still much disagreement among political thinkers as to what tolerance demands, or what can be done to create and sustain a culture of tolerance. The philosophical literature on toleration contains three main strands. (1) An agreement that a tolerant society is more than a modus vivendi; (2) discussion of the proper object(s) of toleration; (3) debate about (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Andrew Jason Cohen (2004). What Toleration Is. Ethics 115 (1):68-95.
    Attempting to settle various debates from recent literature regarding its precise nature, I offer a detailed conceptual analysis of toleration. I begin by isolating toleration from other notions; this provides us some guidance by introducing the eight definitional conditions of toleration that I then explicate and defend. Together, these eight conditions indicate that toleration is an agent’s intentional and principled refraining from interfering with an opposed other (or their behavior, etc.) in situations of diversity, where the agent believes she has (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Herman de Dijn (1994). Tolerance, Loyalty to Values and Respect for the Law. Ethical Perspectives 1 (1):27-32.
  11. Richard Dees (2002). Review of Anna Elisabetta Galeotti, Toleration As Recognition. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (11).
  12. Richard H. Dees (2004). Trust and Toleration. Routledge.
    This book outlines the social, conceptual, and psychological preconditions for toleration.By looking closely at the religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in France and England and at contemporary controversies about the rights of homosexuals, Richard Dees demonstrates how trust between the opposing parties is needed first, but in just these cases, distrust is all-too-rational. Ultimately, that distrust can only be overcome if the parties undergo a fundamental shift of values - a conversion. Only then can they accept some (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. James J. Delaney & Jeffrey Dueck (2003). A Rethinking of Contemporary Religious Tolerance. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:73-82.
    In relating philosophy to intercultural understanding, one of the key problems that arises is that of the relationship between tolerance and religious belief.This paper challenges the common understanding of tolerance in contemporary debates over religious diversity. It argues that tolerance is overused and over-applied in these debates, and has wrongfully come to refer to tactlessness, harshness of condemnation, and even exclusivity of belief. In seeking to clarify the concept and ensure its appropriate usage, it proposes that religious tolerance should only (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Oyuna Dorzhiguishaeva (2008). Tolerance as the Basic Category of Buddhist Ethics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:13-19.
    The concept of tolerance is one of the basic ethical categories of Buddhism. Showing conscious tolerance, you control a situation and do not allow feelings, such as anger or arrogance to take top above reason. Besides, the tolerance to other people and different situation shows your wide scope and common emancipation. The tolerance is one of qualities inherent to bodhisattvas - sacred Buddhists. These qualities are called paramita, and paramita of tolerance - kshanti-paramita. Kshanti-paramita is triple: tolerance to other alive (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Enrique Dussel (2004). Deconstruction of the Concept of "Tolerance": From Intolerance to Solidarity. Constellations 11 (3):326-333.
  16. Derek Edyvane (2011). Tolerance and Pain. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):405-419.
    It is often thought that tolerance must be painful; the absence of pain is taken as an indication of indifference, an indication that the agent does not really disapprove of the object of her professed tolerance. This article challenges that view by arguing that the association of tolerance and pain depends ultimately upon the contentious assumption that inner conflict is a form of dysfunction. By unsettling that assumption, it is possible to unsettle the idea that one?s tolerance of others must (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Adam Etinson (2014). On Shareable Reasons: A Comment on Forst. Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (1):76-88.
  18. Arnold Farr (2008). Diversity, Color-Blindness, and Other Hegemonic Discourses. Social Philosophy Today 24:91-105.
    In this paper I will examine the ways in which concepts and ideas that are used for emancipatory purposes eventually backfire and are used to perpetuate systems of domination. Part of my argument will be based on Herbert Marcuse’s essay “Repressive Tolerance.” In this essay, Marcuse examines the way in which the concept of tolerance, which has its origin in the struggle for liberation, is used by members of dominant social groups to advocate for tolerance of their oppressive views. Following (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Colin Farrelly, Neutrality, Toleration and Reasonable Agreement.
    It is widely agreed, claims John Horton, “that the core of the concept of toleration is the refusal, where one has the power to do so, to prohibit or seriously interfere with conduct one finds objectionable”.1 Liberals champion toleration as one of the main political virtues of a just society. The tolerant society is one which protects a diverse array of fundamental freedoms ranging from freedom of conscience and religion to freedom of expression and freedom of association. Secure in the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Maria Paola Ferretti & Sune Lægaard (2013). A Multirelational Account of Toleration. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):224-238.
    Toleration classically denotes a relation between two agents that is characterised by three components: objection, power, and acceptance overriding the objection. Against recent claims that classical toleration is not applicable in liberal democracies and that toleration must therefore either be understood purely attitudinally or purely politically, we argue that the components of classical toleration are crucial elements of contemporary cases of minority accommodation. The concept of toleration is applicable to, and is an important element of descriptions of such cases, provided (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Andrew Fiala (2005). Existentialism and Repressive Toleration. Studies in Practical Philosophy 5 (1):90-111.
  22. Andrew Fiala (2003). Stoic Tolerance. Res Publica 9 (2):149-168.
    This article considers the virtue of tolerance as it is found in Epictetus and MarcusAurelius. It defines the virtue of tolerance and links it to the Stoic idea of proper control of the passions in pursuit of both self-sufficiency and justice. It argues that Stoic tolerance is neither complete in difference nor a species of relativism. Finally, it discusses connections between the moral virtue of Stoic tolerance and the idea of political toleration found in modern liberalism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. George P. Fletcher (1993). The Commonality of Loyalty and Tolerance. Criminal Justice Ethics 12 (1):68-70.
  24. Rainer Forst, Toleration. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  25. R. G. Frey (1977). TOLERATION by Preston King. Philosophical Books 18 (2):87-87.
  26. Marek Fritzhand (1979). What Is the Meaning of Tolerance at a Time of Cultural Diversity? Dialectics and Humanism 6 (4):11-14.
  27. Ernesto Garzon Valdes (1997). Some Remarks on the Concept of Toleration. Ratio Juris 10 (2):127-138.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. P. G. Gleis (1947). The Concept of Religious Tolerance in the Novels of Enrica Von Handel-Mazzetti. Thought 22 (3):530-532.
  29. Lourdes Gordillo (2008). The Principle of Toleration and Respect for Truth. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:77-94.
    In this paper I explain the principle of tolerance in a double aspect, reference to truth and to the individual. Tolerance is diferent from another similar concepts and we analyze some socials paradoxes that the tolerance brings. In the base of tolerance is respect to the truth and to the individual. For that reason, the studyof the concept of respect as the fundament of tolerance is the sustain in which the real solidarity an peace are establish.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jonathan Gorman (1995). For Tolerance. Philosophy Now 12:22-23.
  31. Leslie Green (2008). On Being Tolerated. In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political, and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Why is it that toleration can be uncomfortable for the tolerated? And how should tolerators respond to that discomfort? This paper argues that properly directed toleration can be deficient in its scope, grounds or spirit. That explains some of the discomfort in being tolerated. Beyond this, the occasions for toleration - the existence of a power to prevent and of an adverse judgment - can also make toleration sting. The paper then explores and rejects two familiar suggestions about how one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Anders Hansson (2007). The Concept of Tolerance. Theoria 73 (4):284-303.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Eliana Herrera-Vega (2012). Explorations on the Notion of Legal Tolerance. World Futures 68 (4-5):280 - 295.
    This article builds on the notion of legal tolerance and analyzes the scope of its definition. It situates the notion in the complex set of relations occurring between the major systems of society. Generally, legal tolerance, as a concept, is understood in light of the possibilities of the legal system of influencing other major systems? responses. On the other hand, tolerance is also the response of the legal system in respect to other major systems? communications. Although there is a common (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. John Horton (2011). Why the Traditional Conception of Toleration Still Matters. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):289-305.
    The ?traditional? conception of toleration, understood as the putting up with beliefs and practices by those who disapprove of them, has come under increasing attack in recent years for being negative, condescending and judgemental. Instead, its critics argue for a more positive, affirmative conception, perhaps best captured by Anna Elisabetta Galeotti?s idea of ?toleration as recognition?. In this article, without denying that it is not always the most appropriate form of response to differences, I defend the traditional conception of toleration (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Horton & Susan Mendus (1985). Introduction. In John Horton & Susan Mendus (eds.), Aspects of Toleration: Philosophical Studies. Methuen.
  36. Hahn Hsu (2008). Toleration, Reason, and Virtue. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:257-268.
    It is virtuous for individual and collective agents to be tolerant. However, toleration is difficult, both in practice and in conceptualization. Firstly, given that toleration can be understood in various ways (Walzer 1997, Forst 2007), it seems that to determine what is the proper conception of toleration would be controversially difficult. Here I shall suggest one particular conception of toleration is more suitable than others. This conception allows, as I shall explain, us to better understandthe difficulties of toleration. Thus, this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Duncan Ivison (2006). Review of Catriona McKinnon, Toleration: A Critical Introduction. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).
  38. Sally L. Jenkinson (1996). Two Concepts of Tolerance: Or Why Bayle is Not Locke. Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (4):302–321.
  39. Peter Jones (2006). Toleration, Recognition and Identity. Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (2):123–143.
  40. Peter Jones (1985). Toleration, Harm, and Moral Effect. In John Horton & Susan Mendus (eds.), Aspects of Toleration: Philosophical Studies. Methuen.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter Nigel Jones (2010). Toleration and Recognition: What Should We Teach? Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):38-56.
    Generally we think it good to tolerate and to accord recognition. Yet both are complex phenomena and our teaching must acknowledge and cope with that complexity. We tolerate only what we object to, so our message to students cannot be simply, 'promote the good and prevent the bad'. Much advocacy of toleration is not what it pretends to be. Nor is it entirely clear what sort of conduct should count as intolerant. Sometimes people are at fault for tolerating what they (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. E. I. Kelly (2003). Tolerance: Between Forbearance and Acceptance. Philosophical Review 112 (2):266-269.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Medhat Khattar (2011). Toleration, Civility, and Absolute Presuppositions. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 16 (1-2):113-135.
    This article argues that toleration understood as the principled restraint from the use of force is an instance of RG. Collingwood's 'ideal of civility' towards which liberalism as the process of civilisation aspires. In the first part of this article, Toleration as Civility, I draw on Collingwood's philosophy to provide an account of toleration as an instance of civility embodying self-respect, historical consciousness, and complete freedom of the will. Accordingly, the limits of toleration are conceived as necessarily informed by the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Peter King (1994). Against Tolerance. Philosophy Now 11:23-24.
    I frequently have trouble with words that other people use with what seems to be blithe understanding (friends tell me that the problem is that I think too much about words, but I find that not thinking doesn't really seem to help). In the case of `tolerance', though, I have no trouble at all - it's a wishy-washy weasel, a mealy-mouthed mink of a word. I suppose I don't want to claim that it has no decent place in the language (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Preston King (1999). Liberty as Power. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (3):1-25.
    Liberty is viewed as the reigning paradigm of our age, but it is a paradigm in crisis. It is conventionally divided into two types, positive and negative. The argument here is that both types can be seen to presuppose some capacity, which may extend to power. Liberty, however, is normally accorded a higher moral value than power. But if liberty is taken itself to reflect a commitment to power, then the disvalue ostensibly placed upon the latter is unreliable. Furthermore, if (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Carl R. Kordig (1982). Concepts of Toleration. Journal of Value Inquiry 16 (1):59-66.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Cornelius Kruse (1963). History of the Concept of Tolerance. World Futures 2 (sup001):4-10.
  48. I. Kucuradi (1996). On Tolerance and the Limits of Toleration. Diogenes 44 (176):163-174.
  49. Sune Lægaard (2013). Attitudinal Analyses of Toleration and Respect and the Problem of Institutional Applicability. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Toleration and respect are types of relations between different agents. The standard analyses of toleration and respect are attitudinal; toleration and respect require subjects to have appropriate types of attitudes towards the objects of toleration or respect. The paper investigates whether states can sensibly be described as tolerant or respectful in ways theoretically relevantly similar to the standard analyses. This is a descriptive question about the applicability of concepts rather than a normative question about whether, when and why states should (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Andrew Mason (2001). Glen Newey, Virtue, Reason and Toleration: The Place of Toleration in Ethical and Political Philosophy, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 1999, Pp. Ix + 208. Utilitas 13 (01):132-.
1 — 50 / 82