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  1. Thomas Adajian (2005). On the Prototype Theory of Concepts and the Definition of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (3):231–236.
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  2. Thomas Adajian (2003). On the Cluster Account of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):379-385.
    The cluster account of art is a purportedly non-definitional account of art, inspired by Wittgenstein's notion of family resemblance, and recently defended by Berys Gaut. Gaut does not provide good reasons to think that art is not definable, and his approach to possible counterexamples to the cluster account would, applied consistently, preclude this. The cluster account's theory of error, its resources for accounting for borderline cases, and its heuristic usefulness are not impressive. Reasons strong enough to warrant accepting the cluster (...)
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  3. Lars-Olof Åhlberg (1995). Analytic Aesthetics and Anti-Essentialism: A Reply to Richard Shusterman. British Journal of Aesthetics 35 (4):387-389.
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  4. Derek Allan (2009). Art and the Human Adventure: André Malraux's Theory of Art. Rodopi.
    " Suitable for both newcomers to Malraux and more advanced students, the study also examines critical responses to these works by figures such as Maurice ...
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  5. Derek Allan (2003). André Malraux and the Challenge to Aesthetics. Journal of European Studies 33 (128): 23-40.
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  6. Meter Amevans (1975). Art for Art's Sake Again? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (3):303-307.
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  7. Meter Amevans (1971). Is It Art? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (1):39-48.
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  8. Sondra Bacharach (2007). The Philosophy of Art. By Davies, Stephen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):240–242.
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  9. Sondra Bacharach (2002). Can Art Really End? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):57–66.
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  10. John A. Bailey (1963). A Reply to Mischel's "Collingwood on Art as 'Imaginative Expression'". Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):372 – 378.
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  11. Tibor Bárány (2013). “This is Not Art” — Should We Go Revisionist About Works of Art? Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 5:86-99.
    To propose a revisionist ontology of art one has to hold that our everyday intuitions about the identity and persistence conditions of various kinds of artworks can be massively mistaken. In my presentation I defend this view: our everyday intuitions about the nature of art can be (and sometimes are) mistaken. First I reconstruct an influential argument of Amie L. Thomasson (2004; 2005; 2006; 2007a; 2007b) against the fallibility of our intuitive judgments about the identity and persistence conditions of various (...)
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  12. Moshe Barasch (1985/2000). Theories of Art. Routledge.
    In this volume, the third in his classic series on art theory, Moshe Barasch traces the hidden patterns and interlocking themes in the study of art, from impressionism to abstract art. Barasch details the immense social changes in the creation, presentation, and reception of art which have set the history of art theory on a vertiginous new course: the decreased relevance of workshops and art schools; the replacement of the treatise by the critical review; and the emerging interrelationship between scientific (...)
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  13. Christopher Bartel (2005). Art and Value. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):94-96.
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  14. Timothy W. Bartel (1979). Appreciation and Dickie's Definition of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (1):44-52.
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  15. David Clowney (2011). Definitions of Art and Fine Art's Historical Origins. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):309-320.
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  16. Daniel Cohnitz, Wann Ist Eine Definition von 'Kunst' Gut?
    n diesem Kapitel soll das Problem ›Was genstand dieses Kapitels. Wir werden sehen, ist Kunst?‹, wie es sich für die analytische dass sich diese Adäquatheitsbedingungen aus Kunstphilosophie stellt, erläutert und eine Reiunserer Auffassung von analytischer Philosohe von »Adäquatheitsbedingungen« für seine phie heraus begründen lassen. Dieses zweite möglichen Lösungen formuliert werden. Adä- Kapitel bereitet also gewissermaßen den theoquatheitsbedingungen sind dabei Anforderunretischen Boden für die Folgekapitel. gen, die wir an eine potentielle Problemlösung Wie aus der Charakterisierung der analystellen und die eine Bewertung (...)
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  17. R. G. Collingwood (1958). The Principles of Art. New York, Oxford University Press.
    This treatise on aesthetics criticizes various psychological theories of art, offers new theories and interpretations, and draws important inferences concerning ...
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  18. Diarmuid Costello (2004). On Late Style: Arthur Danto’s the Abuse of Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):424-439.
    cannot grasp what is at stake in it without taking both its claims and its tone seriously. Read philosophically, Danto wants to reconceive art’s aesthetic dimension as those features that ‘inflect’ our attitude towards a work’s meaning, and to distinguish, in so doing, between beauty that is and beauty that is not internal to that meaning. Although welcome, I argue that his attempt to carry this through is compromised by his countervailing tendency to conceive the aesthetic in non-cognitive terms. Read (...)
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  19. Paul Crowther (2007). Defining Art, Creating the Canon: Artistic Value in an Era of Doubt. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : normative aesthetics and artistic value -- Culture and artistic value -- Cultural exclusion and the definition of art -- Defining art, defending the canon, contesting culture -- The aesthetic and the artistic -- From beauty to art : developing Kant's aesthetics -- The scope and value of the artistic image -- Distinctive modes of imaging -- Twofoldness : pictorial art and the imagination -- Between language and perception : literary metaphor -- Musical meaning and value -- Eternalizing the (...)
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  20. T. J. Diffey (1973). Essentialism and the Definition of ‘Art’. British Journal of Aesthetics 13 (2):103-120.
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  21. John Dilworth (2007). In Support of Content Theories of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):19 – 39.
    A content theory of art would identify an artwork with the meaningful or representational content of some concrete artistic vehicle, such as the intentional, expressive, stylistic, and subject matter-related content embodied in, or resulting from, acts of intentional artistic expression by artists. Perhaps surprisingly, the resultant view that an artwork is nothing but content seems to have been without theoretical defenders until very recently, leaving a significant theoretical gap in the literature. I present some basic arguments in defence of such (...)
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  22. Gene Fendt (1997). The Others In/Of Aristotle's Poetics. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting (primarily) the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it (in several different ways). As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis (...)
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  23. Simon Fokt (2014). The Cluster Account of Art: A Historical Dilemma. Contemporary Aesthetics 12:N/A.
    The cluster account, one of the best attempts at art classification, is guilty of ahistoricism. While cluster theorists may be happy to limit themselves to accounting for what art is now rather than how the term was understood in the past, they cannot ignore the fact that people seem to apply different clusters when judging art from different times. This paper shows that while allowing for this kind of historical relativity may be necessary to save the account, doing so could (...)
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  24. Simon Fokt (2014). Andina, Tiziana: The Philosophy of Art: The Question of Definition: From Hegel to Post-Dantian Theories, 2013. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):ayu018.
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  25. Simon Fokt (2013). Solving Wollheim's Dilemma: A Fix for the Institutional Definition of Art. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):640-654.
    Richard Wollheim threatened George Dickie's institutional definition of art with a dilemma which entailed that the theory is either redundant or incomprehensible and useless. This article modifies the definition to avoid such criticism. First, it shows that the definition's concept of the artworld is not vague when understood as a conventional system of beliefs and practices. Then, based on Gaut's cluster theory, it provides an account of reasons artworld members have to confer the status of a candidate for appreciation. An (...)
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  26. Simon Fokt (2012). Pornographic Art - A Case From Definitions. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):287-300.
    On the whole, neither those who hold that pornography can never be art nor their opponents specify what they actually mean by ‘art’, even though it seems natural that their conclusions should vary depending on how the concept is understood. This paper offers a ‘definitional crossword’ and confronts some definitions of pornography with the currently most well-established definitions of art. My discussion shows that following any of the modern definitions entails that at least some pornography not only can be, but (...)
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  27. D. W. Gotshalk (1941). A Relational Theory of Fine Art. Journal of Philosophy 38 (13):350-359.
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  28. Mitchell Green (2009). Aesthetic Creation • by N. Zangwill. Analysis 69 (2):399-401.
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  29. Dominic Griffiths (forthcoming). The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination. In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
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  30. J. Hospers (1956). The Croce-Collingwood Theory of Art. Philosophy 31 (119):291-308.
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  31. Dale Jacquette (ed.) (1996). Schopenhauer, Philosophy, and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection brings together thirteen new essays by some of the most respected contemporary scholars of Schopenhauer's aesthetics from a wide spectrum of philosophical perspectives. The dynamics of the empirical will and Will as a thing-in-itself in the interplay of Schopenhauer's metaphysics and philosophy of fine art has important implications for the freedom, salvation, and tragic suffering of the artist, the representation of Platonic Ideas in art, and the role of artistic inspiration, emotion, and aesthetic pleasure in the beautiful and (...)
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  32. Donald Kuspit (ed.) (1998). Art Criticism.
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  33. P. Lewis (1989). Collingwood on Art and Fantasy. Philosophy 64 (250):547-556.
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  34. Dominic McIver Lopes (2008). Nobody Needs a Theory of Art. Journal of Philosophy 105 (3):109-127.
    The question "what is art?" is often said to be venerable and vexing. In fact, the following answer to the question should be obvious: (R) item x is a work of art if and only if x is a work in practice P and P is one of the arts. Yet (R) has appeared so far from obvious that nobody has given it a moment's thought. The trouble is not that anyone might seriously deny the truth of (R), but rather (...)
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  35. Dominic Mciver Lopes (2007). The Aesthetic Function of Art. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):484–487.
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  36. Hans Maes (ed.) (2013). Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  37. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Art & Art-Attempts. Oxford University Press.
    Although few philosophers agree about what it is for something to be art, most, if not all, agree that art must be in some sense intention dependent. -/- Christy Mag Uidhir argues that artworks are the products of the attempts (goal-oriented intention-directed activities) in which we engage, and these attempts not only succeed or fail but have products that reflect that success or failure. It is not just that an artwork must be the product of intentional action but rather that (...)
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  38. Christy Mag Uidhir (2010). Failed-Art and Failed Art-Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):381-400.
    An object being non-art appears only trivially informative. Some non-art objects, however, could be saliently 'almost' art, and therefore objects for which being non-art is non-trivially informative. I call these kinds of non-art objects 'failed-art' objects—non-art objects aetiologically similar to art-objects, diverging only in virtue of some relevant failure. I take failed-art to be the right sort of thing, to result from the right sort of action, and to have the right sort of history required to be art, but to (...)
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  39. Christy Mag Uidhir & P. D. Magnus (2011). Art Concept Pluralism. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):83-97.
    Abstract: There is a long tradition of trying to analyze art either by providing a definition (essentialism) or by tracing its contours as an indefinable, open concept (anti-essentialism). Both art essentialists and art anti-essentialists share an implicit assumption of art concept monism. This article argues that this assumption is a mistake. Species concept pluralism—a well-explored position in philosophy of biology—provides a model for art concept pluralism. The article explores the conditions under which concept pluralism is appropriate, and argues that they (...)
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  40. Raamy Majeed (forthcoming). From Zombie Art to Dead Art. Think.
    Zombie art, or salvage art, are artworks that are damaged beyond repair, deemed ‘no-longer-art’ by insurance companies, and removed from the market and stored at claims inventories due to their purported loss of value. This paper aims to make sense of the notion of zombie art. It then aims to determine whether artefacts that fall under this concept retain any aesthetic value, and whether they can genuinely cease being artworks, i.e. be dead art.
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  41. André Malraux (1960). The Metamorphosis of the Gods. Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday.
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  42. Mohan Matthen (2011). Art, Sexual Selection, Group Selection (Critical Notice of Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):337-356.
    The capacity to engage with art is a human universal present in all cultures and just about every individual human. This indicates that this capacity is evolved. In this Critical Notice of Denis Dutton's The Art Instinct, I discuss various evolutionary scenarios and their consequences. Dutton and I both reject the "spandrel" approach that originates from the work of Gould and Lewontin. Dutton proposes, following work of Geoffrey Miller, that art is sexually selected--that art-production is a sign of a fit (...)
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  43. Patrick Maynard (forthcoming). Photography and Technology. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, 2d, rev. ed. Oxford UP.
    Extensive revision of 1998 entry (for expanded new edition of Encyclopedia of Aesthetics) to include, besides mini-essays on technology, art, depiction and the aesthetic, a development of the last in terms of facture--the materials of a work and their working there, as perceivable in the work.
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  44. Patrick Maynard (2012). Arts, Agents, Artifacts: Photography's Automatisms. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):727-745.
    Recent advances in paleoarchaeology show why nothing in the Tate Modern, where a conference on "Agency & Automatism" took place, challenges the roots of 'the idea of the fine arts' (Kristeller) as high levels of craft, aesthetics, mimesis and mental expression, as exemplifying cultures: it is by them that we define our species. This paper identifies and deals with resistances, early and late, to photographic fine art as based on concerns about automatism reducing human agency--that is, mental expression--then offers the (...)
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  45. Patrick Maynard (2012). What's So Funny? Comic Content in Depiction. In Cook Meskin (ed.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper addresses standard questions regarding comics and the arts (comics and fine arts, image and word combinations), then poses and addresses the neglected, but deeper and wider--thus philosophical--question, of how depictions, not just words, can have mental contents at all, including light, funny, scathing, comic ones.
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  46. Patrick Maynard (2008). Scales of Space and Time in Photography: Perception Points Two Ways. In Scott Walden (ed.), Philosophy and Photography.
    Combining ideas of perceptual psychologists J.J. Gibson and J.E. Cutting, moving on to answer the arguments of the "Naysayers" against autonomous and artistic meaning in photographs.
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  47. Patrick Maynard (1997). The Engine of Visualization: Thinking Through Photography. Cornell University Press.
    First ever philosophy treatise on photography, analytic in approach but sensitive to photo-history, not confined to aesthetics or art (illus.), Walker Evans photo on cover. Papercover printing, Dec. 2000.
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  48. Patrick Maynard (1992). Review of Richard Bolton (Ed.), The Contest of Meaning: Critical Histories of Photography. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (1):68-71.
    Editor's errata: Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52.2 (Spring 1994): 167.
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  49. Patrick Maynard (1991). Photo-Opportunity. Canadian Review of American Studies 22 (3):501-528.
    Review of literature and independent essay on the 1989 sesquicentennial of photography, winner of Canadian Association for American Studies 1991 award for paper that "best exemplifies the discipline of American Studies".
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  50. Kevin Melchionne (1998). Re-Thinking Site-Specificity in Public Art: Some Critical and Philosophical Problems. In Donald Kuspit (ed.), Art Criticism. 36-49.
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