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  1. Patrick Anselme & Robert M. French (1999). Interactively Converging on Context-Sensitive Representations: A Solution to the Frame Problem. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 53 (209):365-385.
    While we agree that the frame problem, as initially stated by McCarthy and Hayes (1969), is a problem that arises because of the use of representations, we do not accept the anti-representationalist position that the way around the problem is to eliminate representations. We believe that internal representations of the external world are a necessary, perhaps even a defining feature, of higher cognition. We explore the notion of dynamically created context-dependent representations that emerge from a continual interaction between working memory, (...)
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  2. Theodore Bach (2012). Analogical Cognition: Applications in Epistemology and the Philosophy of Mind and Language. Philosophy Compass 7 (5):348-360.
    Analogical cognition refers to the ability to detect, process, and learn from relational similarities. The study of analogical and similarity cognition is widely considered one of the ‘success stories’ of cognitive science, exhibiting convergence across many disciplines on foundational questions. Given the centrality of analogy to mind and knowledge, it would benefit philosophers investigating topics in epistemology and the philosophies of mind and language to become familiar with empirical models of analogical cognition. The goal of this essay is to describe (...)
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  3. Liliana Barakońska & Małgorzata Nitka (1997). Illustration: A Contaminated Frame. The European Legacy 2 (4):755-758.
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  4. Mark H. Bickhard, Why Children Don't Have to Solve the Frame Problems.
    We all believe an unbounded number of things about the way the world is and about the way the world works. For example, I believe that if I move this book into the other room, it will not change color -- unless there is a paint shower on the way, unless I carry an umbrella through that shower, and so on; I believe that large red trucks at high speeds can hurt me, that trucks with polka dots can hurt me, (...)
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  5. Sheldon J. Chow (2013). What's the Problem with the Frame Problem? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (2):309-331.
    The frame problem was originally a problem for Artificial Intelligence, but philosophers have interpreted it as an epistemological problem for human cognition. As a result of this reinterpretation, however, specifying the frame problem has become a difficult task. To get a better idea of what the frame problem is, how it gives rise to more general problems of relevance, and how deep these problems run, I expound six guises of the frame problem. I then assess some proposed heuristic solutions to (...)
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  6. Andy Clark, Local Associations and Global Reason: Fodor's Frame Problem and Second-Order Search.
    Kleinberg (1999) describes a novel procedure for efficient search in a dense hyper-linked environment, such as the world wide web. The procedure exploits information implicit in the links between pages so as to identify patterns of connectivity indicative of “authorative sources”. At a more general level, the trick is to use this second-order link-structure information to rapidly and cheaply identify the knowledge-structures most likely to be relevant given a specific input. I shall argue that Kleinberg’s procedure is suggestive of a (...)
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  7. Andy Clark (2002). Global Abductive Inference and Authoritative Sources, or, How Search Engines Can Save Cognitive Science. Cognitive Science Quarterly 2 (2):115-140.
    Kleinberg (1999) describes a novel procedure for efficient search in a dense hyper-linked environment, such as the world wide web. The procedure exploits information implicit in the links between pages so as to identify patterns of connectivity indicative of “authorative sources”. At a more general level, the trick is to use this second-order link-structure information to rapidly and cheaply identify the knowledge- structures most likely to be relevant given a specific input. I shall argue that Kleinberg’s procedure is suggestive of (...)
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  8. L. Crockett (1994). The Turing Test and the Frame Problem: AI's Mistaken Understanding of Intelligence. Ablex.
    I have discussed the frame problem and the Turing test at length, but I have not attempted to spell out what I think the implications of the frame problem ...
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  9. Daniel C. Dennett (1984). Cognitive Wheels: The Frame Problem of AI. In C. Hookway (ed.), Minds, Machines and Evolution. Cambridge University Press.
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  10. Hubert L. Dreyfus & Stuart E. Dreyfus (1987). How to Stop Worrying About the Frame Problem Even Though It's Computationally Insoluble. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex. 95--112.
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  11. James H. Fetzer (1990). The Frame Problem: Artificial Intelligence Meets David Hume. International Journal of Expert Systems 3:219-232.
  12. James H. Fetzer (ed.) (1988). Aspects of AI. D.
  13. Jerry A. Fodor (1989). Modules, Frames, Fridgeons, Sleeping Dogs. In Modularity in Knowledge Representation and Natural-Language Understanding. Cambridge: MIT Press.
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  14. Jerry A. Fodor (1987). Modules, Frames, Fridgeons, Sleeping Dogs, and the Music of the Spheres. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex. 139--49.
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  15. Jerry A. Fodor (1987). Modules, Frames, Fridgeons. In Modularity In Knowledge Representation And Natural-Language Understanding. Cambridge: Mit Press.
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  16. K. M. Ford & Z. W. Pylyshyn (eds.) (1996). The Robot's Dilemma Revisited: The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence. Ablex.
    The chapters in this book have evolved from talks originally presented at The First International Workshop on Human and Machine Cognition.
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  17. Kenneth M. Ford & Z. Pylylshyn (eds.) (1994). The Robot's Dilemma Revisited. Ablex.
    The chapters in this book have evolved from talks originally presented at The First International Workshop on Human and Machine Cognition.
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  18. Patrick J. Hayes Kenneth M. Ford & Neil M. Agnew (1996). Goldilocks and the Frame. In K. M. Ford & Z. W. Pylyshyn (eds.), The Robot's Dilemma Revisited: The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence. Ablex.
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  19. Marcello Frixione & Antonio Lieto (2012). Representing Concepts in Formal Ontologies: Compositionality Vs. Typicality Effects". Logic and Logical Philosophy 21 ( Logic, Reasoning and Rationalit):391-414.
    The problem of concept representation is relevant for many sub-fields of cognitive research, including psychology and philosophy, as well as artificial intelligence. In particular, in recent years it has received a great deal of attention within the field of knowledge representation, due to its relevance for both knowledge engineering as well as ontology-based technologies. However, the notion of a concept itself turns out to be highly disputed and problematic. In our opinion, one of the causes of this state of affairs (...)
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  20. Martin Gerson (1976). A Neighbourhood Frame for T with No Equivalent Relational Frame. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 22 (1):29-34.
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  21. Clark Glymour, The Adventures Among the Asteroids of Angela Android, Series 8400XF with an Afterword on Planning, Prediction, Learning, the Frame Problem, and a Few Other Subjects.
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  22. Clark Glymour (1996). The Frame Problem, and a Few. In K. M. Ford & Z. W. Pylyshyn (eds.), The Robot's Dilemma Revisited: The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence. Ablex. 25.
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  23. Jarek Gryz (2013). The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence and Philosophy. Filozofia Nauki 2 (2):15-30.
    The field of Artificial Intelligence has been around for over 60 years now. Soon after its inception, the founding fathers predicted that within a few years an intelligent machine would be built. That prediction failed miserably. Not only hasn’t an intelligent machine been built, but we are not much closer to building one than we were some 50 years ago. Many reasons have been given for this failure, but one theme has been dominant since its advent in 1969: The Frame (...)
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  24. Robert Hadley (1988). Zenon Pylyshyn, Ed., The Robot's Dilemma: The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (1):33-36.
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  25. W. F. G. Haselager & J. F. H. Van Rappard (1998). Connectionism, Systematicity, and the Frame Problem. Minds and Machines 8 (2):161-179.
    This paper investigates connectionism's potential to solve the frame problem. The frame problem arises in the context of modelling the human ability to see the relevant consequences of events in a situation. It has been claimed to be unsolvable for classical cognitive science, but easily manageable for connectionism. We will focus on a representational approach to the frame problem which advocates the use of intrinsic representations. We argue that although connectionism's distributed representations may look promising from this perspective, doubts can (...)
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  26. Susan D. Haseltine (2006). Scientists Should Help Frame the Discussion. BioScience 56 (4):289-290.
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  27. John Haugeland (1987). An Overview of the Frame Problem. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex.
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  28. Patrick Hayes (1987). What the Frame Problem is and Isn't. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex.
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  29. Scott Hendricks (2006). The Frame Problem and Theories of Belief. Philosophical Studies 129 (2):317-33.
    The frame problem is the problem of how we selectively apply relevant knowledge to particular situations in order to generate practical solutions. Some philosophers have thought that the frame problem can be used to rule out, or argue in favor of, a particular theory of belief states. But this is a mistake. Sentential theories of belief are no better or worse off with respect to the frame problem than are alternative theories of belief, most notably, the “map” theory of belief.
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  30. Christopher Hookway (ed.) (1984). Minds, Machines And Evolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of original essays written by philosophers and scientists and dealing with philosophical questions arising from work in evolutionary biology and artificial intelligence. In recent years both of these areas have been the focus for attempts to provide a scientific, model of a wide range of human capacities - most prominently perhaps in sociobiology and cognitive psychology. The book therefore examines a number of issues related to the search for a 'naturalistic' or scientific account of human experience (...)
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  31. Terry Horgan & Mark Timmons (2009). What Does the Frame Problem Tell Us About Moral Normativity? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):25 - 51.
    Within cognitive science, mental processing is often construed as computation over mental representations—i.e., as the manipulation and transformation of mental representations in accordance with rules of the kind expressible in the form of a computer program. This foundational approach has encountered a long-standing, persistently recalcitrant, problem often called the frame problem; it is sometimes called the relevance problem. In this paper we describe the frame problem and certain of its apparent morals concerning human cognition, and we argue that these morals (...)
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  32. L. Janlert (1996). The Frame Problem: Freedom or Stability? With Pictures We Can Have Both. In K. M. Ford & Z. W. Pylyshyn (eds.), The Robot's Dilemma Revisited: The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence. Ablex. 35--48.
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  33. Lars-Erik Janlert (1987). Modeling Change: The Frame Problem. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex. 156.
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  34. Jean Kazez (2011). Beyond the Frame. The Philosophers' Magazine 52:115-116.
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  35. Julian Kiverstein & Michael Wheeler (eds.) (2012). Heidegger and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  36. Kevin B. Korb (1998). The Frame Problem: An AI Fairy Tale. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 8 (3):317-351.
    I analyze the frame problem and its relation to other epistemological problems for artificial intelligence, such as the problem of induction, the qualification problem and the "general" AI problem. I dispute the claim that extensions to logic (default logic and circumscriptive logic) will ever offer a viable way out of the problem. In the discussion it will become clear that the original frame problem is really a fairy tale: as originally presented, and as tools for its solution are circumscribed by (...)
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  37. Benjamin Kuipers (1985). The Cognitive Map Overlaps the Environmental Frame, the Situation, and the Real-World Formulary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):298-299.
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  38. Theodor M. Künnapas (1955). Influence of Frame Size on Apparent Length of a Line. Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (3):168.
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  39. Vladimir Lifschitz (2015). The Dramatic True Story of the Frame Default. Journal of Philosophical Logic 44 (2):163-176.
    This is an expository article about the solution to the frame problem proposed in 1980 by Raymond Reiter. For years, his “frame default” remained untested and suspect. But developments in some seemingly unrelated areas of computer science—logic programming and satisfiability solvers—eventually exonerated the frame default and turned it into a basis for important applications.
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  40. Eric Lormand (1998). The Frame Problem. In Robert A. Wilson & Frank F. Keil (eds.), Mit Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences (Mitecs). Mit Press.
    From its humble origins labeling a technical annoyance for a particular AI formalism, the term "frame problem" has grown to cover issues confronting broader research programs in AI. In philosophy, the term has come to encompass allegedly fundamental, but merely superficially related, objections to computational models of mind in AI and beyond.
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  41. Eric Lormand (1994). The Holorobophobe's Dilemma. In Kenneth M. Ford & Z. Pylylshyn (eds.), The Robot's Dilemma Revisited. Ablex. 61--88.
    Much research in AI (and cognitive science, more broadly) proceeds on the assumption that there is a difference between being well-informed and being smart. Being well-informed has to do, roughly, with the content of one’s representations--with their truth and the range of subjects they cover. Being smart, on the other hand, has to do with one’s ability to process these representations and with packaging them in a form that allows them to be processed efficiently. The main theoretical concern of artificial (...)
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  42. Eric Lormand (1990). Framing the Frame Problem. Synthese 82 (3):353-74.
    The frame problem is widely reputed among philosophers to be one of the deepest and most difficult problems of cognitive science. This paper discusses three recent attempts to display this problem: Dennett's problem of ignoring obviously irrelevant knowledge, Haugeland's problem of efficiently keeping track of salient side effects, and Fodor's problem of avoiding the use of kooky concepts. In a negative vein, it is argued that these problems bear nothing but a superficial similarity to the frame problem of AI, so (...)
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  43. L. Magnani & R. Dossena (eds.) (2005). Computing, Philosophy and Cognition.
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  44. J. Christopher Maloney (1988). In Praise of Narrow Minds. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Aspects of AI. D.
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  45. John McCarthy & Patrick Hayes (1969). Some Philosophical Problems From the Standpoint of Artificial Intelligence. In B. Meltzer & Donald Michie (eds.), Machine Intelligence 4. Edinburgh University Press. 463--502.
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  46. Ron McClamrock (1995). Existential Cognition: Computational Minds in the World. University of Chicago Press.
    While the notion of the mind as information-processor--a kind of computational system--is widely accepted, many scientists and philosophers have assumed that this account of cognition shows that the mind's operations are characterizable independent of their relationship to the external world. Existential Cognition challenges the internalist view of mind, arguing that intelligence, thought, and action cannot be understood in isolation, but only in interaction with the outside world. Arguing that the mind is essentially embedded in the external world, Ron McClamrock provides (...)
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  47. Drew McDermott (1987). We've Been Framed: Or, Why AI is Innocent of the Frame Problem. In Zenon W. Pylyshyn (ed.), The Robot's Dilemma. Ablex.
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  48. B. Meltzer & Donald Michie (eds.) (1969). Machine Intelligence 4. Edinburgh University Press.
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  49. Leora Morgenstern (1996). The Problem with Solutions to the Frame Problem. In K. M. Ford & Z. W. Pylyshyn (eds.), The Robot's Dilemma Revisited: The Frame Problem in Artificial Intelligence. Ablex. 99--133.
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  50. D. Murphy (2001). Folk Psychology Meets the Frame Problem - W. F. G. Haselager, Cognitive Science and Folk Psychology (London: Sage Publications, 1997), X + 165 Pp. ISBN 0-761-95425-2 Hardback £55.00; ISBN 0-761-95426-0 Paperback £17.99. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):565-573.
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