This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
92 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 92
  1. M. T. Antonelli (1948). H. Y. PATON, "The Categorical Imperative - A study in Kant's Moral, Philosophy". [REVIEW] Epistemologia 3 (5):535.
  2. H. Barker (1948). PATON, H. J. - The Categorical Imperative: A Study in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 57:93.
  3. Gerald W. Barnes (1971). In Defense of Kant's Doctrine of the Highest Good. Philosophical Forum 2 (4):446.
    MANY COMMENTATORS HAVE SAID THAT KANT'S DOCTRINE OF THE HIGHEST GOOD - AS EXPRESSED IN THE SECOND CRITIQUE, FOR EXAMPLE - IS SERIOUSLY FLAWED BOTH IN ITSELF AND IN THAT IT CONTRADICTS OTHER IMPORTANT CLAIMS OF KANT'S MORAL PHILOSOPHY. I ADVANCE AN INTERPRETATION OF KANT'S DOCTRINE ON WHICH IT SUFFERS FROM NONE OF THESE ALLEGED FLAWS.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marcia Baron (1984). The Alleged Moral Repugnance of Acting From Duty. Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):197-220.
    Friends as well as foes of Kant have long been uneasy over his emphasis on duty, but lately the view that there is something morally repugnant about acting from duty seems to be gaining in popularity. More and more philosophers indicate their readiness to jettison duty and the moral 'ought' and to conceive of the perfectly moral person as someone who has all the right desires and acts accordingly without any notion that (s)he ought to act in this way. Elsewhere' (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Anne Margaret Baxley (2007). Kantian Virtue. Philosophy Compass 2 (3):396–410.
  6. Anne Margaret Baxley (2003). Does Kantian Virtue Amount to More Than Continence? Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):559 - 586.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Avner Baz (2008). Being Right, and Being in the Right. Inquiry 51 (6):627 – 644.
    This paper presents a critique of a prevailing conception of the relation between moral reasoning and judgment on the one hand, and moral goodness on the other. I argue that moral reasoning is inescapably vulnerable to moral, as opposed to merely theoretical, failure. This, I argue, means that there is something deeply misleading in the way that Kant's moral theory, and some of its main rivals, have invited us to conceive of their subject matter.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul Benson (1987). Moral Worth. Philosophical Studies 51 (3):365 - 382.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. D. Beyleveld & S. Pattinson (2000). Precautionary Duty as a Link to Moral Action. In James Torr (ed.), Medical Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Richard A. Blanke (1985). The Motivation to Be Moral in the Groundwork to the Metaphysics of Morals. Philosophy Research Archives 11:335-345.
    Kant maintained that in order for an act to have moral worth it is necessary that it be done from the motive of duty. On the traditional view of Kant, the motive of duty is constituted solely by one’s belief or cognition that some act is one’s duty. Desire must be ruled out as forming partof the moral motive. On this view, if an agent’s act is to have moral worth, then it must be the ease that his belief that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Talbot Brewer (2002). The Character of Temptation: Towards a More Plausible Kantian Moral Psychology. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):103–130.
    Kant maintained that dutiful action can have the fullest measure of moral worth even if chosen in the face of powerful inclinations to act immorally, and indeed that opposing inclinations only highlight the worth of the action. I argue that this conclusion rests on an implausibly mechanistic account of desires, and that many desires are constituted by tendencies to see certain features of one’s circumstances as reasons to perform one or another action. I try to show that inclinations to violate (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David O. Brink (1999). Review: Engstrom & Whiting, Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics. Philosophical Review 108 (4):576-582.
  13. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Review: Stratton-Lake, Kant, Duty and Moral Worth. Utilitas 15 (02):248-.
  14. Gregory Lewis Bynum (2011). Kant's Conception of Respect and African American Education Rights. Educational Theory 61 (1):17-40.
    Immanuel Kant envisioned a kind of respect in which one recognizes each human (1) as being not fully comprehensible by any human understanding, (2) as being an end in him- or herself, and (3) as being a potential source of moral law. In this essay, Gregory Lewis Bynum uses this conception of respect as a lens with which to examine African American education rights on three levels: the individual level (the level of individual persons' moral experience and moral significance), the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Islay George Campbell (1980). Kantian Conceptions of Moral Worth. Dissertation, Princeton University
    In this thesis I focus attention on views about the nature of morally good persons and actions which are associated with the Kantian tradition in ethics. After a short introductory chapter, Chapter II outlines the Kantian view that morally good persons are motivated by a sense of duty, not by inclination. I try to explain why many people have found this view problematic and in need of defence. In Chapter III, I try to explain the view that morally good persons (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Claudia Card (2010). Kant's Moral Excluded Middle. In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
  17. Bernard Carnois (1987). The Coherence of Kant's Doctrine of Freedom. University of Chicago Press.
    The term freedom appears in many contexts in Kant's work, ranging from the cosmological to the moral to the theological. Can the diverse meanings Kant gave to the term be ordered systematically? To ask that question is to test the consistency and coherence of Kant's thought in its entirety. Widely praised when first published in France, The Coherence of Kant's Doctrine of Freedom articulates and interrelates the disparate senses of freedom in Kant's work. Bernard Carnois organizes all Kant's usages into (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Michael Cholbi (2014). A Direct Kantian Duty to Animals. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):338-358.
    Kant's view that we have only indirect duties to animals fails to capture the intuitive notion that wronging animals transgresses duties we owe to those animals. Here I argue that a suitably modified Kantianism can allow for direct duties to animals and, in particular, an imperfect duty to promote animal welfare without unduly compromising its core theoretical commitments, especially its commitments concerning the source and nature of our duties toward rational beings. The basis for such duties is that animal welfare, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Sr Mary Bernard Curran (2009). What is Pure, What is Good? Disinterestedness in Fénelon and Kant. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):195-205.
    Two philosophers, Robert Spaemann and Henri Gouhier, have identified a similarity between Fénelon and Kant in the prominence of motive in their thought: disinterestedness in Fénelon's pure love and in Kant's good will. Spaemann emphasizes their common detaching of the ethical in terms of motivation from the context of happiness. In this article I explore further similarities and differences under the topics of perfectionism, pure love, good will, happiness, and disinterestedness, as these are pertinent to their thought. On perfectionism there (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Howard J. Curzer (1997). From Duty, Moral Worth, Good Will. Dialogue 36 (02):287-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Stephen Darwall (2008). Kant on Respect, Dignity, and the Duty of Respect. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
  22. Rodrigo Jungmann de Castro (2010). Is Moral Worth Compatible with Cooperating Inclinations? Princípios 12 (17-18):05-18.
    Algumas passagens bastante controversas dos Fundamentos da Metafísica dos Costumes sáo comumente interpretados como se Kant propusesse a tese de que as ações náo podem ter qualquer valor moral quando estiverem acompanhadas de inclinações ( Neigungen ) favoráveis a tais ações. O que resulta dessa interpretaçáo é uma retrato de Kant como um severo defensor de uma moralidade em que sentimentos de compaixáo e assemelhados nada acrescentam ao valor moral de uma açáo, e em vez disso, o solapam. Neste artigo, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Darian C. DeBolt (2002). Review: Pasternack, Intrinslc Value and Overridingness in Kant's Groundwork. [REVIEW] Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):121-125.
  24. Lara Denis (2011). Humanity, Obligation, and the Good Will: An Argument Against Dean's Interpretation of Humanity. Kantian Review 15 (1):118-141.
    Humanity is an important notion within Kant's moral theory. The humanity formulation of the categorical imperative commands: ‘So act that you use humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, always at the same time as an end, never merely as a means’ . Kant's analysis of ethical obligation and his expositions of rights and duties in the Metaphysics of Morals refer frequently to humanity. How we understand this concept, then, has signifcant implications for how (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jeffrey Edwards (2014). Squire Allworthy’s Inclinations and Acting From Duty: The Problem of Moral Worth in Kant’s Criticism of Sentimentalist Ethics. In Mario Egger (ed.), Philosophie Nach Kant: Neue Wege Zum Verständnis von Kants Transzendental- Und Moralphilosophie. De Gruyter. 251-278.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Julio Esteves (2014). The Primacy of the Good Will. Kant-Studien 105 (1):83-112.
  27. Benjamin Ferguson (2012). Kant on Duty in the Groundwork. Res Publica 18 (4):303-319.
    Barbara Herman offers an interpretation of Kant’s Groundwork on which an action has moral worth if the primary motive for the action is the motive of duty. She offers this approach in place of Richard Henson’s sufficiency-based interpretation, according to which an action has moral worth when the motive of duty is sufficient by itself to generate the action. Noa Latham criticizes Herman’s account and argues that we cannot make sense of the position that an agent can hold multiple motives (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Richard Galvin (1991). On the Alleged Repugnance of Acting From the Motive of Duty. Mind 100:221-236.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. J. L. A. Garcia (1990). Motive and Duty. Idealistic Studies 20 (3):230-237.
  30. J. L. A. Garcia (1990). Motive and Duty. Idealistic Studies 20 (3):230-237.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Sasha Gennet (2004). The Ecological Benefits of EPA Actions: What Are They Worth? BioScience 54 (3):188.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert Hanna (2006). Review: Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):237-240.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Warren G. Harbison (1980). The Good Will. Kant-Studien 71 (1-4):47-59.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. John Hardwig (1983). Action From Duty but Not in Accord with Duty. Ethics 93 (2):283-290.
    In thc Foundations, Kant draws a distinction bctwccn action which is in accord with duty and action which is done from the motive of duty. This is 21 famous distinction, of course, and thcrc arc many interesting issues concerning it and its implications for ethical thcory. In this paper, I wish t0 focus on just 0nc noteworthy feature of K2mt’s usc of this distinction. Likc any distinction bctwccn logical compatiblcs, this 0nc yields four logically possible classes of action: (1) actions (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jonathan Harrison (1963). Moral Talking and Moral Living: PHILOSOPHY. Philosophy 38 (146):315-328.
    People unacquainted with moral philosophy suppose that its business is to tell us the difference between right and wrong. Many moral philosophers, unfortunately, seem to agree with them, to the extent, at any rate, of taking it for granted that there is some one divison of actions into two classes, which division is of some especial or even unique significance. Actions, they have supposed, are either right or wrong. If they are right, then they must and ought to be done, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Richard G. Henson (1979). What Kant Might Have Said: Moral Worth and the Overdetermination of Dutiful Action. Philosophical Review 88 (1):39-54.
    My purpose is to account for some oddities in what Kant did and did not say about "moral worth," and for another in what commentators tell us about his intent. The stone with which I hope to dispatch these several birds is-as one would expect a philosopher's stone to be-a distinction. I distinguish between two things Kant might have had in mind under the heading of moral worth. They come readily to mind when one both takes account of what he (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Barbara Herman (1981). On the Value of Acting From the Motive of Duty. Philosophical Review 90 (3):359-382.
    Richard Henson attempts to take the sting out of this view of Kant on moral worth by arguing (i) that attending to the phenomenon of the overdetermination of actions leads one to see that Kant might have had two distinct views of moral worth, only one of which requires the absence of cooperating inclinations, and (ii) that when Kant insists that there is moral worth only when an action is done from the motive of duty alone, he need not also (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jill Hernandez (2010). Impermissibility and Kantian Moral Worth. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):403 - 419.
    Samuel Kerstein argues that an asymmetry between moral worth and maxims prevents Kant from accepting a category of acts that are impermissible, but have moral worth. Kerstein contends that an act performed from the motive of duty should be considered as a candidate for moral worth, even if the action's maxim turns out to be impermissible, since moral worth depends on the correct moral motivation of an act, rather than on the moral lightness of an act. I argue that Kant (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jill Hernandez (2006). On Asymmetry In Kant's Doctrine Of Moral Worth. Florida Philosophical Review 6 (1):43-52.
    That an act can have moral worth even if the end of the action is not realized seems asymmetrical with Kant’s dual notion that acts cannot have moral worth if the maxim for action is impermissible. Recent scholarship contends that fixing the asymmetry will allow impermissible acts done from a morally worthy motive to have moral worth. I argue against the asymmetry thesis and contend that Kant cannot consistently maintain a class of impermissible, morally worthy action and the view that (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas E. Hill (1998). Punishment, Conscience, and Moral Worth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):51-71.
  41. Diane Jeske (1998). A Defense of Acting From Duty. Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (1):61–74.
    Philosophers who, in the light of these attacks, have attempted to vindicate the motive of duty have done so in a half-hearted way, by stressing the motive of duty’s function as a secondary or limiting motivation, or by denying “that acting from duty primarily concerns isolated actions.” I will defend duty as a primary motive with respect to isolated actions. Critics of acting from duty and philosophers who have attempted to respond to them have done little work spelling out exactly (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Robert Johnson, Kantian Irrealism.
    Kantian ethics can at times appear to defend the position that there is a unique sort of value that plays a foundational role in morality. For instance, Kant's most well known work in ethics, the Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals, begins by trying to establish that a good will is good without qualification' and then ends with a first statement of the fundamental principle that divides right from wrong, the Categorical Imperative.1 This presentation can make it seems as if (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Robert Johnson, Merit.
    A few pages into the Groundwork Kant claims that only actions from duty have moral worth.ii Even though as an aside he also says that a dutiful action from sympathy or honor, though lacking in moral worth, "deserves praise and encouragement", it is tempting not to take him very seriously. One suspects that he regards this praise as only a poor and morally insignificant cousin of the esteem reserved for actions from duty. In the end, it seems hard to avoid (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robert Johnson (2009). Good Will and the Moral Worth of Acting From Duty. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The first section of the Groundwork begins “It is impossible to imagine anything at all in the world, or even beyond it, that can be called good without qualification— except a good will.”1 Kant’s explanation and defense of this claim is followed by an explanation and defense of another related claim, that only actions performed out of duty have moral worth. He explains that actions performed out of duty are those done from respect for the moral law, and then culminates (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Robert N. Johnson (1997). Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology. Philosophical Review 106 (4):594-595.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Robert N. Johnson (1996). Expressing a Good Will: Kant on the Motive of Duty. Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):147-168.
    If any action is to be morally good it is not enough that it should conform to the moral law-it must also be done for the sake of the moral law: where this is not so, the conformity is only too contingent and precarious, since the nonmoral ground at work will now and then produce actions which accord with the law, but very often actions which transgress it.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Robert N. Johnson, Kantian Irrealism.
    Kantian ethics can at times appear to defend the position that there is a unique sort of value that plays a foundational role in morality. For instance, Kant’s most well known work in ethics, the Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals, begins by trying to establish that a good will is good ‘without qualification’ and then ends with a first statement of the fundamental principle that divides right from wrong, the Categorical Imperative.1 This presentation can make it seems as if (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Robert Neal Johnson (1993). Kant's Theory of Moral Worth. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    The Kantian theory of moral worth, because it emphasizes the role of reason, has been universally castigated for being disaffecting, impersonal and alienating. My thesis is that, to the contrary, it is through its emphasis on reason that the Kantian view is able to give a full-blooded place to our sentiments, partial ties and projects in morality. ;My first task is to show how standard interpretations of Kant's theory misrepresent his true concerns. Typically, his views are treated as nothing more (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Elizabeth Peisinger Kanon, Stipulating Moral Status.
    Moral worth is determined by moral agents. How is such a determination made? Western philosophical thought originally demarcated between human and all else. Some contemporary writers seek to extend moral worth to animals, and still others seek to grant ecosystems such worth. This dissertation will consider three predominant writers on the subject of moral worth: Immanuel Kant, Tom Regan and Peter Singer. After consideration of each writer’s strengths and weaknesses, a hybrid view will be presented. The perfect-relationship view extends moral (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Samuel J. Kerstein (2004). Review: Hill, Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Ethics 114 (2):350-353.
1 — 50 / 92