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  1. Sophie R. Allen (2010). Can Theoretical Underdetermination Support the Indeterminacy of Translation? Revisiting Quine's 'Real Ground'. Philosophy 85 (1):67-90.
    It is commonly believed that Quine's principal argument for the Indeterminacy of Translation requires an untenably strong account of the underdetermination of theories by evidence, namely that that two theories may be compatible with all possible evidence for them and yet incompatible with each other. In this article, I argue that Quine's conclusion that translation is indeterminate can be based upon the weaker, uncontroversial conception of theoretical underdetermination, in conjunction with a weak reading of the 'Gavagai' argument which establishes the (...)
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  2. Dorit Bar-On (1993). Indeterminacy of Translation--Theory and Practice. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (4):781-810.
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  3. Christopher Boorse (1975). The Origins of the Indeterminacy Thesis. Journal of Philosophy 72 (13):369-387.
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  4. M. C. Bradley (1980). More on Mind-Body Problem and Indeterminacy of Translation. Mind 89 (354):261-262.
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  5. M. C. Bradley (1977). Mind-Body Problem and Indeterminacy of Translation. Mind 86 (343):345-367.
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  6. H. G. Callaway (2006). Review of Eve Gaudet, Quine on Meaning: The Indeterminacy of Translation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).
    The book contains twelve chapters, prefaced by acknowledg­ments, and followed by a short index. It derives from the author's doctoral dissertation in philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis, and thanks are offered to committee members Robert B. Barrett, Joseph Ullian and Roger Gibson. The reader who is not inclined to review the large related literature on Quine's view of cognitive meaning and translation may also be attracted to this book for concise summaries and treatment of the Quinean view from (...)
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  7. H. G. Callaway (2003). The Esoteric Quine? Belief Attribution and the Significance of the Indeterminacy Thesis in Quine’s Kant Lectures. In , W.V. Quine, Wissenschaft und Empfindung. Frommann-Holzboog.
    This is the Introduction to my translation of Quine's Kant Lectures. Part of my interpretation is that an "esoteric doctrine" in involved in Quine's distinctive semantic claims: his skepticism of the credulity of non-expert evaluation of discourse and theory.
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  8. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2003). W.V. Quine, Immanuel Kant Lectures, translated and introduced by H.G. Callaway. Frommann-Holzboog.
    This book is a translation of W.V. Quine's Kant Lectures, given as a series at Stanford University in 1980. It provide a short and useful summary of Quine's philosophy. There are four lectures altogether: I. Prolegomena: Mind and its Place in Nature; II. Endolegomena: From Ostension to Quantification; III. Endolegomena loipa: The forked animal; and IV. Epilegomena: What's It all About? The Kant Lectures have been published to date only in Italian and German translation. The present book is filled out (...)
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  9. Howard Darmstadter (1974). Indeterminacy of Translation and Indeterminacy of Belief. Philosophical Studies 26 (3-4):229 - 237.
    I argue that quine's thesis of the indeterminacy of radical translation is incorrect. the argument exploits the connections between quine's thesis and common sense notions regarding belief. a simple model of belief, taking beliefs to be sets of brain states, is used to give a rigorous restatement of quine's thesis. it is then argued that our need to project the actions of other people from their professions of belief would make the situation quine describes unstable, since persons in that situation (...)
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  10. Edited & Introductions by Dagfinn Føllesdal (2000). Indeterminacy of Translation. In Dagfinn Føllesdal (ed.), Philosophy of Quine. Garland Pub..
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  11. Catherine Z. Elgin (1979). Quine's Double Standard: Indeterminacy and Quantifying In. Synthese 42 (3):353 - 377.
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  12. Michael Friedman (1975). Physicalism and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Noûs 9 (4):353-374.
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  13. Joseph S. Fulda (2006). A Plea for Automated Language-to-Logical-Form Converters. RASK 24:87-102.
    This has been made available gratis by the publisher. -/- This piece gives the raison d'etre for the development of the converters mentioned in the title. Three reasons are given, one linguistic, one philosophical, and one practical. It is suggested that at least /two/ independent converters are needed. -/- This piece ties together the extended paper "Abstracts from Logical Form I/II," and the short piece providing the comprehensive theory alluded to in the abstract of that extended paper in "Pragmatics, Montague, (...)
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  14. John D. Greenwood (1990). Analyticity, Indeterminacy and Semantic Theory: Some Comments on “the Domino Theory”. Philosophical Studies 58 (1-2):41 - 49.
    In "The Domino Theory" Professor Katz's general thesis is that the arguments against intensionalism advanced in the last four decades are arranged like so many dominos, since they all rest upon Quine's arguments against the analytic-synthetic distinction in "Two Dogmas of Empiricism". If this is the case, then they are all vitiated if Quine's original arguments are unsatisfactory, and fall like so many dominos. I propose to accept, if only for the sake of argument, that all the other critiques of (...)
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  15. James F. Harris (1976). Indeterminacy of Translation and Analyticity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):239-243.
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  16. Donald Hockney (1975). The Bifurcation of Scientific Theories and Indeterminacy of Translation. Philosophy of Science 42 (4):411-427.
    In this essay I present a statement of Quine's indeterminacy thesis in its general form. It is shown that the thesis is not about difficulties peculiar to so-called "radical translation." It is a general thesis about meaning and reference with important consequences for any theory of our theories and beliefs. It is claimed that the thesis is inconsistent with Quine's realism, his doctrine of the relativity of reference, and that the argument for the thesis has the consequence that the concept (...)
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  17. B. M. Humphries (1970). Indeterminacy of Translation and Theory. Journal of Philosophy 67 (6):167-178.
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  18. Peter Hylton (1991). Translation, Meaning, and Self-Knowledge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 91 (269--90):269 - 290.
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  19. Peter Hylton (1982). Analyticity and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Synthese 52 (2):167 - 184.
  20. Alison Jaggar (1973). On One of the Reasons for the Indeterminacy of Translation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (2):257-265.
    Quine's claim for the unavoidable indeterminacy of translation is partially supported by an argument based on the premise that the analytical hypotheses of the translator are underdetermined by the behavioural evidence on the strength of which they are asserted. I make three points about this argument. First, I show that quine's treatment of analytical hypotheses is inconsistent with his treatment of the hypotheses of physical science. Secondly, I argue that, Since no reason for this difference in treatment is given, Quine's (...)
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  21. Michael E. Levin (1979). Forcing and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Erkenntnis 14 (1):25 - 32.
    Quine's arguments for the indeterminacy of translation rest on behaviorist presuppositions [AL 1/29/2004].
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  22. Christian List, Indeterminacy of Translation Reassessed: Is the Problem of Translation an Empirical Matter?
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  23. Duncan MacIntosh (1989). Modality, Mechanism and Translational Indeterminacy. Dialogue 28 (03):391-.
    Ken Warmbrod thinks Quine agrees that translation is determinate if it is determinate what speakers would say in all possible circumstances; that what things would do in merely possible circumstances is determined by what their subvisible constituent mechanisms would dispose them to do on the evidence of what alike actual mechanisms make alike actual things do actually; and that what speakers say is determined by their neural mechanisms. Warmbrod infers that people's neural mechanisms make translation of what people say determinate. (...)
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  24. Gerald J. Massey (1992). The Indeterminacy of Translation: A Study in Philosophical Exegesis. Philosophical Topics 20 (1):317-345.
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  25. Peter Pagin (2008). Indeterminacy and the Analytic/Synthetic Distinctions: A Survey. Synthese 164 (1):1 - 18.
    It is often assumed that there is a close connection between Quine's criticism of the analytic/synthetic distinction, in 'Two dogmas of empiricism' and onwards, and his thesis of the indeterminacy of translation, in Word and Object and onwards. Often, the claim that the distinction is unsound (in some way or other) is taken to follow from the indeterminacy thesis, and sometimes the indeterminacy thesis is supported by such a claim. However, a careful scrutiny of the indeterminacy thesis as stated by (...)
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  26. W. V. Quine (1987). Indeterminacy of Translation Again. Journal of Philosophy 84 (1):5-10.
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  27. W. V. Quine (1970). On the Reasons for Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophy 67 (6):178-183.
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  28. Panu Raatikainen (2005). On How to Avoid the Indeterminacy of Translation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):395-413.
    Quine’s thesis of the indeterminacy of translation has puzzled the philosophical community for several decades. It is unquestionably among the best known and most disputed theses in contemporary philosophy. Quine’s classical argument for the indeterminacy thesis, in his seminal work Word and Object, has even been described by Putnam as “what may well be the most fascinating and the most discussed philosophical argument since Kant’s Transcendental Deduction of the Categories” (Putnam, 1975a: p. 159).
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  29. Shyam Ranganathan (2011). An Archimedean Point for Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):479-519.
    According to the orthodox account of meaning and translation in the literature, meaning is a property of expressions of a language, and translation is a matching of synonymous expressions across languages. This linguistic account of translation gives rise to well-known skeptical conclusions about translation, objectivity, meaning and truth, but it does not conform to our best translational practices. In contrast, I argue for a textual account of meaning based on the concept of a TEXT-TYPE that does conform to our best (...)
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  30. Richard Rorty (1972). Indeterminacy of Translation and of Truth. Synthese 23 (4):443 - 462.
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  31. Howard Sankey (1991). Incommensurability and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (2):219 – 223.
    In this paper it is argued that the concept of translation failure involved in Kuhn's thesis of incommensurability is distinct from that of translational indeterminacy in Quine's sense. At most, Kuhnian incommensurability constitutes a weak form of indeterminacy, quite distinct from Quine's. There remains, however, a convergence between the two views of translation, namely, that there is no single adequate translation between languages.
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  32. Karl Schick (1972). Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophy 64 (22):818-832.
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  33. Brendan Shea (2010). Three Ways of Getting It Wrong: Induction in Wonderland. In Richard Brian Davis (ed.), Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy: Curiouser and Curiouser. Wiley Blackwell. 93-107.
    Alice encounters at least three distinct problems in her struggles to understand and navigate Wonderland. The first arises when she attempts to predict what will happen in Wonderland based on what she has experienced outside of Wonderland. In many cases, this proves difficult -- she fails to predict that babies might turn into pigs, that a grin could survive without a cat or that playing cards could hold criminal trials. Alice's second problem involves her efforts to figure out the basic (...)
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  34. Edward S. Shirley (1971). Stimulus Meaning and Indeterminacy of Translation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):417-422.
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  35. Robert Sinclair (2009). Why Quine is Not an Externalist. Journal of Philosophical Research 34:279-304.
    This essay reconsiders the place of meaning within Quine’s naturalism. It takes as its point of departure Davidson’s claim that Quine’s linguistic behaviorism entails a form of semantic externalism. It then further locates this claim within the Davidson-Quine debate concerning whether the proximal or distal stimulus is the relevant determinant of semantic content. An interpretation of Quine’s developing views on translation and epistemology is defended that rejects Davidson’s view that Quine be read as a proto-externalist. Quine’s empirical evaluation of translation (...)
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  36. Peter Smith (1975). Kirk on Quine's Reasons for Indeterminacy of Translation. Philosophical Studies 27 (6):427 - 431.
    An argument given by kirk ("analysis" 33.6) against quine's 1970 defense of his indeterminacy thesis is discussed. It is shown that kirk's claim that quine's argument is self-Defeating is unacceptable.
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  37. Scott Soames (1999). The Indeterminacy of Translation and the Inscrutability of Reference. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):321-370.
    Quine's argument for indeterminacy and inscrutability equivocates about what it is for one set of truths to determine another. In addition to being unsupported, these doctrines lead Quine to reject our ordinary notions of meaning, truth, and reference in favor of certain replacement notions, including stimulus meaning, and disquotational, or Tarski, truth and reference for one's own present language. This is self-defeating. To formulate the doctrines of physicalism, underdetermination, indeterminacy, and inscrutability, one must refer to the totality of true propositions (...)
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  38. Barry Stroud (1968). Conventionalism and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Synthese 19 (1-2):82 - 96.
    Quine's arguments for the indeterminacy of translation demonstrate the existence and help to explain the rationale of restraints upon what we can say and understand. In particular they show that there are logical truths to which there are no intelligible alternatives. Thus the standard view that the truths of logic and mathematics differ from "synthetic" statements in being true solely by virtue of linguistic convention--Which requires for its plausibility the existence of intelligible alternatives to our present logical truth--Is opposed directly, (...)
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  39. Nancy Tuana (1981). Taking the Indeterminacy of Translation One Step Further. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):283 - 291.
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  40. Alan Weir (2006). Indeterminacy of Translation. In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oup Oxford.
  41. Markus Werning (2004). Compositionality, Context, Categories and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Erkenntnis 60 (2):145-178.
    The doctrine that meanings are entitieswith a determinate and independent reality is often believed tohave been undermined by Quine's thought experiment of radicaltranslation, which results in an argument for the indeterminacy oftranslation. This paper argues to the contrary. Starting fromQuine's assumption that the meanings of observation sentences arestimulus meanings, i.e., set-theoretical constructions of neuronalstates uniquely determined by inter-subjectively observable facts,the paper shows that this meaning assignment, up to isomorphism,is uniquely extendable to all expressions that occur inobservation sentences. To do so, (...)
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