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  1. B. D. A. (1965). Infinity: An Essay in Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 18 (4):772-772.
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  2. Wolfgang Achtner (2011). Part I. Perspectives on Infinity From History : 1. Infinity as a Transformative Concept in Science and Theology. In Michał Heller & W. H. Woodin (eds.), Infinity: New Research Frontiers. Cambridge University Press.
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  3. B. Allen (2004). Infinity and Perspective. Common Knowledge 10 (2):366-366.
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  4. R. E. Allen (1974). Unity and Infinity: Parmenides 142b-145a. Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):697 - 725.
  5. Victor Allis & Teun Koetsier (1995). On Some Paradoxes of the Infinite II. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (2):235-247.
    In an earlier paper the authors discussed some super-tasks by means of a kinematical interpretation. In the present paper we show a semi-formal way that a more abstract treatment is possible. The core idea of our approach is simple: if a super-task can be considered as a union of (finite) tasks, it is natural to define the effect of the super-task as the union of the effects of the finite tasks it consists of. We show that this approach enables us (...)
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  6. Joseph Almog (1999). Nothing, Something, Infinity. Journal of Philosophy 96 (9):462-478.
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  7. Logique A. Analyse (2008). Some Attempts at a Direct Reduction of the Infinite to the (Large) Finite Luca Bellotti. Logique Et Analyse 51:3.
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  8. L. Anckaert (2006). A Critique of Infinity: Rosenzweig and Levinas. Peeters.
    As such, this book is both a critique and a tribute to Rosenzweig and Levinas. The book contains an exhaustive bibliography of the comparative studies.
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  9. Svante Arrhenius (1911). Infinity of the Universe. The Monist 21 (2):161-173.
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  10. Steven Barbone (1995). Infinity in Descartes. Philosophical Inquiry 17 (3-4):23-38.
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  11. J. Benardete (1979). The Infinite in Mathematics. Review of Metaphysics 32 (4):761-762.
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  12. José A. Benardete (1964). Infinity: An Essay in Metaphysics. Clarendon Press.
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  13. Vieri Benci, Leon Horsten & Sylvia Wenmackers (2012). Axioms for Non-Archimedean Probability (NAP). In De Vuyst J. & Demey L. (eds.), Future Directions for Logic; Proceedings of PhDs in Logic III - Vol. 2 of IfColog Proceedings. College Publications.
    In this contribution, we focus on probabilistic problems with a denumerably or non-denumerably infinite number of possible outcomes. Kolmogorov (1933) provided an axiomatic basis for probability theory, presented as a part of measure theory, which is a branch of standard analysis or calculus. Since standard analysis does not allow for non-Archimedean quantities (i.e. infinitesimals), we may call Kolmogorov's approach "Archimedean probability theory". We show that allowing non-Archimedean probability values may have considerable epistemological advantages in the infinite case. The current paper (...)
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  14. Joël Biard & J. Celeyrette (eds.) (2005). De la Théologie aux Mathématiques: L'Infini au XIVe Siècle. Belles Lettres.
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  15. Janet Borgerson (forthcoming). A Secret Ethics of Infinity. Levinas, Business Ethics.
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  16. Johannes Brachtendorf (ed.) (2008). Unendlichkeit: Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven. Mohr Siebeck.
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  17. J. A. Bracken (1996). While Being as Infinite is Formless, Being as Infinite is Not Concrete: A Reply to Georges Hélal's' Pure Existence, Formless Infinite Being as Ultimate Reality and Meaning'(URAM 17: 70-83). [REVIEW] Ultimate Reality and Meaning 19 (2):156-157.
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  18. Manuel Bremer, Frege's Basic Law V and Cantor's Theorem.
    The following essay reconsiders the ontological and logical issues around Frege’s Basic Law (V). If focuses less on Russell’s Paradox, as most treatments of Frege’s Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (GGA)1 do, but rather on the relation between Frege’s Basic Law (V) and Cantor’s Theorem (CT). So for the most part the inconsistency of Naïve Comprehension (in the context of standard Second Order Logic) will not concern us, but rather the ontological issues central to the conflict between (BLV) and (CT). These ontological (...)
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  19. Manuel Bremer (2007). Varieties of Finitism. Metaphysica 8 (2):131-148.
    I consider here several versions of finitism or conceptions that try to work around postulating sets of infinite size. Restricting oneself to the so-called potential infinite seems to rest either on temporal readings of infinity (or infinite series) or on anti-realistic background assumptions. Both these motivations may be considered problematic. Quine’s virtual set theory points out where strong assumptions of infinity enter into number theory, but is implicitly committed to infinity anyway. The approaches centring on the indefinitely large and the (...)
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  20. Douglas S. Bridges (1995). Constructive Mathematics and Unbounded Operators — a Reply to Hellman. Journal of Philosophical Logic 24 (5):549 - 561.
    It is argued that Hellman's arguments purporting to demonstrate that constructive mathematics cannot cope with unbounded operators on a Hilbert space are seriously flawed, and that there is no evidence that his thesis is correct.
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  21. Manuel Cabada Castro (2009). Philosophical Foundation of the" Transfinite" in G. Cantor and the Question of Infinity. Pensamiento 65 (246):669-711.
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  22. Manuel Cabada Castro (2008). Recuperar la Infinitud: En Torno Al Debate Histórico-Filosófico Sobre la Limitación o Ilimitación de la Realidad. Universidad Pontificia Comillas.
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  23. Adelino Cardoso (ed.) (2006). O Envolvimento Do Infinito No Finito. Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa.
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  24. P. Cariani (2012). Infinity and the Observer: Radical Constructivism and the Foundations of Mathematics. Constructivist Foundations 7 (2):116-125.
    Problem: There is currently a great deal of mysticism, uncritical hype, and blind adulation of imaginary mathematical and physical entities in popular culture. We seek to explore what a radical constructivist perspective on mathematical entities might entail, and to draw out the implications of this perspective for how we think about the nature of mathematical entities. Method: Conceptual analysis. Results: If we want to avoid the introduction of entities that are ill-defined and inaccessible to verification, then formal systems need to (...)
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  25. Rovelli Carlo (2011). Some Considerations on Infinity in Physics. In Michał Heller & W. H. Woodin (eds.), Infinity: New Research Frontiers. Cambridge University Press. 167--175.
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  26. Massimiliano Carrara & Enrico Martino (2011). On the Infinite in Mereology with Plural Quantification. Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (1):54-62.
    In Lewis reconstructs set theory using mereology and plural quantification (MPQ). In his recontruction he assumes from the beginning that there is an infinite plurality of atoms, whose size is equivalent to that of the set theoretical universe. Since this assumption is far beyond the basic axioms of mereology, it might seem that MPQ do not play any role in order to guarantee the existence of a large infinity of objects. However, we intend to demonstrate that mereology and plural quantification (...)
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  27. Joseph S. Catalano (1969). Aristotle and Cantor: On the Mathematical Infinite. Modern Schoolman 46 (3):264-267.
  28. Mark Cauchi (2003). Infinite Spaces Walter Benjamin and the Spurious Creations of Capitalism. Angelaki 8 (3):23 – 39.
  29. Ram Chandra (1963). Towards Infinity. [Shahjahanpur, Shri Ram Chandra Mission.
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  30. Michael Clark (1992). An Introduction to Infinity. Cogito 6 (1):18-23.
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  31. Brian Clegg (2003). Infinity: The Quest to Think the Unthinkable. Distributed by Publishers Group West.
    It amazes children, as they try to count themselves out of numbers, only to discover one day that the hundreds, thousands, and zillions go on forever—to something like infinity. And anyone who has advanced beyond the bounds of basic mathematics has soon marveled at that drunken number eight lying on its side in the pages of their work. Infinity fascinates; it takes the mind beyond its everyday concerns—indeed, beyond everything—to something always more. Infinity makes even the infinite universe seem (...)
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  32. Daniel O. Dahlstrom, David T. Ozar & Leo Sweeney (eds.) (1981). Infinity. National Office of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Catholic University of America.
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  33. Joseph W. Dauben (1977). Georg Cantor and Pope Leo XIII: Mathematics, Theology, and the Infinite. Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (1):85-108.
  34. Anne Ashley Davenport (1999). Measure of a Different Greatness: The Intensive Infinite, 1250-1650. Brill.
    This volume examines a selection of late medieval works devoted to the intensive infinite in order to draw a comprehensive picture of the context, character and ...
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  35. Donatella Di Cesare (2004). Ermeneutica Della Finitezza. Guerini Studio.
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  36. Ray H. Dotterer (1918). The Definition of Infinity. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (11):294-301.
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  37. F. I. Dretske (1965). Counting to Infinity. Analysis 25 (Suppl-3):99--101.
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  38. A. Drozdek (2000). Gutberlet's Principle (Priority of Actual Infinity Over Potential Infinity). Philosophisches Jahrbuch 107 (2):471-481.
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  39. Adam Drozdek (2008). In the Beginning Was the Apeiron: Infinity in Greek Philosophy. Steiner.
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  40. Adam Drozdek (2002). Infinity in Chrysippus. Hermes 130 (4):404-415.
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  41. Adam Drozdek (1999). Number and Infinity. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1):35-46.
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  42. Adam Drozdek (1997). In the Beginning Was the Apeiron: Infinity in the Presocratics. Epistemologia 20 (1):3-32.
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  43. Philip Ehrlich (1982). Negative, Infinite, and Hotter Than Infinite Temperatures. Synthese 50 (2):233 - 277.
    We examine the notions of negative, infinite and hotter than infinite temperatures and show how these unusual concepts gain legitimacy in quantum statistical mechanics. We ask if the existence of an infinite temperature implies the existence of an actual infinity and argue that it does not. Since one can sensibly talk about hotter than infinite temperatures, we ask if one could legitimately speak of other physical quantities, such as length and duration, in analogous terms. That is, could there be longer (...)
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  44. E. R. Emmet (1957). Infinity. Mind 66 (262):242-249.
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  45. Austin Marsden Farrer (1979). Finite and Infinite: A Philosophical Essay. Seabury Press.
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  46. Philip Harwood Francis (1968). Mathematics of Infinity. Chichester (Sussex),P. H. Francis, Stoughton Vicarage.
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  47. Joseph S. Fulda (1992). Reply to an Objection to Animal Rights. Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (1):87-88.
    Notwithstanding the numerous errors in this piece, the core teaching remains unscathed: Arithmetic (or any other branch of mathematics) cannot do moral work. If it appears otherwise, that simply means some nonstandard version of the relevant area of mathematics will work. -/- Negative results can indeed sometimes be shown using mathematics, but not on such fundamental normative questions as whether something/someone has rights. Also, mathematics can put into relief, sometimes, a fundamental normative question, even though it cannot resolve it.
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  48. Jerome I. Gellman (1994). Experiencing God's Infinity. American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (1):53 - 61.
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  49. D. A. Gillies (1980). Phenomenology and the Infinite in Mathematics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 31 (3):289-298.
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  50. Santos Gon?alo (forthcoming). Numbers and Everything. Philosophia Mathematica.
    I begin by drawing a parallel between the intuitionistic understanding of quantification over all natural numbers and the generality relativist understanding of quantification over absolutely everything. I then argue that adoption of an intuitionistic reading of relativism not only provides an immediate reply to the absolutist's charge of incoherence but it also throws a new light on the debates surrounding absolute generality.
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