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  1. Varol Akman & Mujdat Pakkan (1996). Nonstandard Set Theories and Information Management. Philosophical Explorations.
    The merits of set theory as a foundational tool in mathematics stimulate its use in various areas of artificial intelligence, in particular intelligent information systems. In this paper, a study of various nonstandard treatments of set theory from this perspective is offered. Applications of these alternative set theories to information or knowledge management are surveyed.
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  2. John Altmann, Why We Need To Take A Socialist Approach In Regards To Information.
    This is an essay discussing the ideal of Information Socialism. Information Socialism is an ideology inspired by Aaron Swartz and is the belief that information should be redistributed freely across the globe. I argue that such a practice would not only strengthen our reins on government here in the U.S., but can also have beneficial economic effects both at home and abroad.
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  3. David Bourget (2010). Paperless Philosophy as a Philosophical Method. Social Epistemology 24 (4):363-375.
    I discuss the prospects for novel communication methods in academic research. I describe communication tools which could enhance the practice of conceptual analysis.
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  4. Todd Davies (2008). A Behavioral Perspective on Technology Evolution and Domain Name Regulation. Pacific McGeorge Global Business and Development Law Journal 21 (1):1-25.
    This paper argues that private property and rights assignment, especially as applied to communication infrastructure and information, should be informed by advances in both technology and our understanding of psychology. Current law in this area in the United States and many other jurisdictions is founded on assumptions about human behavior that have been shown not to hold empirically. A joint recognition of this fact, together with an understanding of what new technologies make possible, leads one to question basic assumptions about (...)
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  5. Daniel Estrada & Jon Lawhead (2013). Gaming the Attention Economy. In Pietro Michelucci (ed.), The Handbook of Human Computation. Springer 961-978.
    The future of human computation (HC) benefits from examining tasks that agents already perform and designing environments to give those tasks computational significance. We call this natural human computation (NHC). We consider the possible future of NHC through the lens of Swarm!, an application under development for Google Glass. Swarm! motivates users to compute the solutions to a class of economic optimization problems by engaging the <span class='Hi'>attention</span> dynamics of crowds. We argue that anticipating and managing economies of <span class='Hi'>attention</span> (...)
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  6. Constance Helfat & Jacqueline Meszaros (1999). Reviews: Knowledge Assets: Securing Competitive Advantage in the Information Economy, Max Boisot. [REVIEW] Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (2):119-123.
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  7. Ming-Hui Huang (2005). Unequal Pricing in the Information Economy: Implications for Consumer Welfare. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):305 - 315.
    This article presents an economic analysis of information good pricing and consumer welfare, and discusses the implications of price discrimination in the information economy. It argues that network externalities, coupled with information asymmetry, enable a dominant marketer to price unequally, extracting late adopters surplus to compensate for the loss from early adopters. In the short term, the minority early adopters benefit by paying less, but in the long term, the majority late adopters suffer by paying more. Considering that late adopters (...)
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  8. Christine James (2015). Data Science and Mass Media: Seeking a Hermeneutic Ethics of Information. Proceedings of the Society for Phenomenology and Media, Vol. 15, 2014, Pages 49-58 15 (2014):49-58.
    In recent years, the growing academic field called “Data Science” has made many promises. On closer inspection, relatively few of these promises have come to fruition. A critique of Data Science from the phenomenological tradition can take many forms. This paper addresses the promise of “participation” in Data Science, taking inspiration from Paul Majkut’s 2000 work in Glimpse, “Empathy’s Impostor: Interactivity and Intersubjectivity,” and some insights from Heidegger’s "The Question Concerning Technology." The description of Data Science (...)
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  9. Leslie Marsh & David Hardwick (2012). Clash of the Titans: When the Market and Science Collide. In Roger Koppl & Steve Horwitz (eds.), Experts and Epistemic Monopolies.
    Purpose/problem statement – Two highly successful complex adaptive systems are the Market and Science, each with an inherent tendency toward epistemic imperialism. Of late, science, notably medical science, seems to have become functionally subservient to market imperatives. We offer a twofold Hayekian analysis: a justification of the multiplicity view of spontaneous orders and a critique of the libertarian justification of market prioricity. Methodology/approach – This chapter brings to light Hayekian continuities between diverse literatures – philosophical, epistemological, cognitive, and scientific. Findings (...)
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  10. Gerd Schienstock (2001). Towards a European Information Economy. Poiesis and Praxis 1 (1):47-65.
    The aim of the paper is to analyse whether and to what extent the network concept has become the Leitbild of an emerging new economy. The analysis is based on a company survey conducted in eight European territories. There is empirical evidence that only a minority of companies have applied the network concept as a dominant restructuring model, while various types of Fordism are still influencing companies' view on efficient techno-organisational forms. The regional analysis demonstrates that there is not only (...)
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  11. Richard A. Spinello (1998). Privacy Rights in the Information Economy. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):723-742.
  12. Olivier Sylvain, Contingency and the 'Networked Information Economy': A Critique of Benkler's 'Wealth of Networks'.
    Yochai Benkler is right when he argues, most recently in The Wealth of Networks, that the "networked public sphere" affords a looser, more democratic "platform" for innovation and deliberation than the "one-way, hub-and-spoke structure" of the "mass-media model." His suggestion, however, that the techniques of meaning production in the emergent technologies themselves vindicate the liberal theory of deliberative democracy is unconvincing to the extent they, in Benkler's rendering, remain unavailable or unintelligible to whole swaths of the citizenry. By overstating the (...)
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