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  1. Jacob M. Appel (2005). Organ Solicitation on the Internet: Every Man for Himself: Commentary. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):14-15.
  2. David Archard (2000). Gordon Graham, The Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW] Ends and Means 4 (3).
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  3. S. G. Arnal (2001). Gordon Graham The Internet://A Philosophical Inquiry. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):311-311.
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  4. Joseph L. Badaracco (1997). The Internet, Intel and the Vigilante Stakeholder. Business Ethics 6 (1):18-29.
    The Internet furore over Intel’s flawed Pentium chip provides an important case study of the ethical ambiguity of internet communications and the legitimacy of certain forms of “electronic activism”. Joseph Badaracco, Jr., is John Shad Professor of Business Ethics at the Harvard Business School and his co‐author is a former Research Associate at Harvard and currently on the editorial staff of Inc. magazine.
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  5. Joseph L. BadaraccoJr (1997). The Internet, Intel and the Vigilante Stakeholder. Business Ethics 6 (1):18–29.
  6. Simon Barker (2000). The End of Argument: Knowledge and the Internet. Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (2):154-181.
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  7. Anne Beaulieu (2004). Mediating Ethnography: Objectivity and the Making of Ethnographies of the Internet. Social Epistemology 18 (2 & 3):139 – 163.
    This paper aims to contribute to current discussions about methods in anthropological (especially ethnographic) research on the cultures of the internet. It does so by considering how technology has been presented in turn as an epistemological boon and bane in methodological discourse around virtual or online ethnography, and cyberanthropology. It maps these discussions with regards to intellectual traditions and ambitions of ethnographic research and social science, and considers how these views of technology relate to modernist discourse about the value of (...)
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  8. Richard F. Beltramini (2003). Application of the Unfairness Doctrine to Marketing Communications on the Internet. Journal of Business Ethics 42 (4):393 - 400.
    The increased usage of marketing communications on the internet has presented a number of significant business ethics issues. And, while regulatory agencies have increased their vigilance in protecting consumers from injury, the uniqueness of business via the internet has challenged these agencies to respond in evolving ways. This paper provides a brief overview of the application of the FTC''s lesser known unfairness doctrine as a potential framework for better understanding emerging privacy and e-commerce issues, and specific examples are provided for (...)
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  9. N. Ben Fairweather, S. Dixon & E. K. Trezise (1998). Business Ethics on the Internet: 3. Business Ethics-Oxford- 7:212-219.
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  10. Jacob A. Benfield & William J. Szlemko (2006). Internet-Based Data Collection: Promises and Realities. Journal of Research Practice 2 (2):Article D1.
    The use of Internet to aid research practice has become more popular in the recent years. In fact, some believe that Internet surveying and electronic data collection may revolutionize many disciplines by allowing for easier data collection, larger samples, and therefore more representative data. However, others are skeptical of its usability as well as its practical value. The paper highlights both positive and negative outcomes experienced in a number of e-research projects, focusing on several common mistakes and difficulties experienced by (...)
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  11. J. -G. Bidima (2006). The Internet and the African Academic World. Diogenes 53 (3):93 - 100.
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  12. D. Birsch (2002). Gordon Graham, the Internet: A Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):325-328.
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  13. Mary I. Bockover (2003). Confucian Values and the Internet: A Potential Conflict. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (2):159–175.
  14. Frank Börncke (1996). Wittgenstein Im Internet. Wittgenstein Studien 3 (2).
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  15. Nick Bostrom, Most Still to Come.
    Perhaps the two most important world events during my thirty‐six years are the ending of the Cold War and the beginning of the Internet. Of those two, I think the latter is the more significant. The Internet has impacted my thinking in several ways. It has put me in touch with people I would not otherwise have met and whose ideas I would never have encountered. It has served as a platform for disseminating my work, helping me get faster and (...)
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  16. David Bourget (2010). Paperless Philosophy as a Philosophical Method. Social Epistemology 24 (4):363-375.
    I discuss the prospects for novel communication methods in academic research. I describe communication tools which could enhance the practice of conceptual analysis.
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  17. Norman E. Bowie & Karim Jamal (2006). Privacy Rights on the Internet: Self-Regulation or Government Regulation? Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):323-342.
    Abstract: Consumer surveys indicate that concerns about privacy are a principal factor discouraging consumers from shopping online. The key public policy issue regarding privacy is whether the US should follow its current self-regulation course (where the FTC encourages websites to obtain private “privacy web-seals”), or whether a European style formal legal regulation approach should be adopted in the US. We conclude that the use of assurance seals has worked reasonably well and websites should be free to decide whether they have (...)
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  18. Frances Brazier, Anja Oskamp, Corien Prins, Maurice Schellekens & Niek Wijngaards (2004). Law-Abiding and Integrity on the Internet: A Case for Agents. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):5-37.
    Software agents extend the current, information-based Internet to include autonomous mobile processing. In most countries such processes, i.e., software agents are, however, without an explicit legal status. Many of the legal implications of their actions (e.g., gathering information, negotiating terms, performing transactions) are not well understood. One important characteristic of mobile software agents is that they roam the Internet: they often run on agent platforms of others. There often is no pre-existing relation between the owner of a running agents process (...)
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  19. Adam Briggle (2008). Real Friends: How the Internet Can Foster Friendship. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):71-79.
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  20. Amy Bruckman (2002). Studying the Amateur Artist: A Perspective on Disguising Data Collected in Human Subjects Research on the Internet. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (3):217-231.
    In the mid-1990s, the Internet rapidly changedfrom a venue used by a small number ofscientists to a popular phenomena affecting allaspects of life in industrialized nations. Scholars from diverse disciplines have taken aninterest in trying to understand the Internetand Internet users. However, as a variety ofresearchers have noted, guidelines for ethicalresearch on human subjects written before theInternet's growth can be difficult to extend toresearch on Internet users.In this paper, I focus on one ethicalissue: whether and to what extent to disguisematerial (...)
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  21. Hubertus Buchstein (1997). Bytes That Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy. Constellations 4 (2):248-263.
  22. Katrina Burt (2009). The Internet – Proposing an Infrastructure for the Philosophy of Virtualness. Techne 13 (1):50-68.
    This paper proposes a preliminary infrastructure for future philosophical discourse on the virtual, interactive, visual, top layer of the Internet. The paper begins by introducing thoughts on such words as real, virtual, reality, knowledge, and truth. Next, news summaries are provided illustrating some effects from the “real world” on the virtual part of the Internet, and vice versa. Subsequently, nine major categories of Internet variables are identified. Finally, over one hundred questions about the philosophical nature of the virtual part of (...)
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  23. Dominique Cardon & Christophe Prieur (2009). Networks of Relations on the Internet: A Research Object for Information Technology and Social Sciences. In Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.), Digital Cognitive Technologies: Epistemology and Knowledge Society. Iste Ltd.
  24. Jacques N. Catudal (1999). Censorship, the Internet, and the Child Pornography Law of 1996: A Critique. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):105-115.
    After describing the Child Pornography Prevention Act (CPPA) of 1996, I argue that the Act ought to be significantly amended. The central objections to CPPA are (1) that it is so broad in its main proscriptions as to violate the First Amendment rights of adults; (2) that it altogether fails to provide minors and their legal guardians with the privacy rights needed to combat the harms associated with certain classes of prurient material on the Internet; and, (3) that the actual (...)
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  25. Robert J. Cavalier (ed.) (2005). The Impact of the Internet on Our Moral Lives. State University of New York Press.
    Leading theorists explore how the Internet impacts privacy issues, sensitivity to wrongdoing, and cultural and personal identity.
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  26. Louis C. Charland (2004). A Madness for Identity: Psychiatric Labels, Consumer Autonomy, and the Perils of the Internet. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):335-349.
  27. Craig A. Childress & Joy K. Asamen (1998). The Emerging Relationship of Psychology and the Internet: Proposed Guidelines for Conducting Internet Intervention Research. Ethics and Behavior 8 (1):19 – 35.
    The Internet is rapidly developing into an important medium of communication in modem society, and both psychological research and therapeutic interventions are being increasingly conducted using this new communication medium. As therapeutic interventions using the Internet are becoming more prevalent, it is becoming increasingly important to conduct research on psychotherapeutic Internet interventions to assist in the development of an appropriate standard of practice regarding interventions using this new medium. In this article, we examine the Internet and the current psychological uses (...)
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  28. Harvey Chinn & Caroline Bledsoe (1997). Internet Access to Ecological Information—the US LTER All-Site Bibliography Project. BioScience 47 (1):50-57.
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  29. Roger Clarke (1999). Ethics and the Internet. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (3/4):153-167.
    This paper commences with an introductory segment that considers infonnation technology generally. This leads into a discussion of the Internet, which is important both in its own right and also because it is the primary instance of the notion of "information infrastructure." The concept cyberspace is introduced as a means of appreciating what it is that people who use the Internet experience. Building on this foundation, the presentation then briefly reviews ethical aspects of individual behaviour, communities, corporate behaviour, and governmental (...)
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  30. Steve Clarke (2007). Conspiracy Theories and the Internet: Controlled Demolition and Arrested Development. Episteme 4 (2):167-180.
    Abstract Following Clarke (2002), a Lakatosian approach is used to account for the epistemic development of conspiracy theories. It is then argued that the hypercritical atmosphere of the internet has slowed down the development of conspiracy theories, discouraging conspiracy theorists from articulating explicit versions of their favoured theories, which could form the hard core of Lakatosian research pro grammes. The argument is illustrated with a study of the “controlled demolition” theory of the collapse of three towers at the World Trade (...)
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  31. D. Clough (2000). The Message of the Medium: The Challenge of the Internet To the Church and Other Communities. Studies in Christian Ethics 13 (2):91-100.
    Imagine, if you can, a small room, hexagonal in shape, like the cell of a bee. It is lighted neither by window nor by lamp, yet it is filled with a soft radiance. There are no apertures for ventilation, yet the air is fresh. There are no musical instruments, and yet, at the moment that my meditation opens, this room is throbbing with melodious sounds. An armchair is in the centre, by its side a reading-desk — that is all the (...)
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  32. David Coady (2011). An Epistemic Defence of the Blogosphere. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):277-294.
    Alvin Goldman claims that the conventional media is in decline as a result of competition from the blogosphere, and that this is a threat to our epistemic wellbeing and, as a result, a threat to good democratic decision-making. He supports this claim with three common complaints about the blogosphere: first, that it is undermining professional journalism, second, that, unlike the conventional media, it lacks ‘balance’, and finally that it is a parasite on the conventional media. I defend the blogosphere against (...)
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  33. Göran Collste (2002). The Internet Doctor and Medical Ethics Ethical Implications of the Introduction of the Internet Into Medical Encounters. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):121-125.
    In this article, consultation via the Internet and the use of the Internet as a source of medical information is examined from an ethical point of view. It is argued that important ethical aspects of the clinical interaction, such as dialogue and trust will be difficult to realise in an Internet-consultation. Further, it is doubtful whether an Internet doctor will accept responsibility. However, medical information via the Internet can be a valuable resource for patients wanting to know more about their (...)
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  34. Jodi Dean (2003). Why the Net is Not a Public Sphere. Constellations 10 (1):95-112.
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  35. Denise E. DeLorme, George M. Sinkhan & Warren French (2001). Ethics and the Internet Issues Associated with Qualitative Research. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (4):271 - 286.
    This paper examines the need for standards to resolve ethical conflicts related to qualitative, on-line research. Practitioners working in the area of qualitative research gauged the breadth and depth of this need. Those practitioners identified several key ethical issues associated with qualitative on-line research, and felt that there should be a common ethics code to cover issues related to Internet research. They also identified challenges associated with the profession's acceptance of a unified code. The paper concludes by offering guidance in (...)
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  36. Jim Demmers & Dara O'Neil (2001). Leavers and Takers. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 5 (3):131-143.
    As pervasive as the use of the Internet has become in the United States, a huge percentage of the world’s population has yet to ever use a telephone. It seems ironic, then, that there is a concerted effort on the part of industrialized nations to first hook up their traditionally disadvantaged citizens to the Internet and second, to hook up citizens of developing nations. This paper addresses the universal access phenomenon by considering the growth of the Internet in terms of (...)
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  37. Ana Cristina Garcia Dias & Marco Antônio Pereira Teixeira (2008). Auto-revelação na Internet: um estudo com estudantes universitários. Aletheia 27:23-35.
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  38. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2002). Anonymity Versus Commitment: The Dangers of Education on the Internet. [REVIEW] Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (4):369–378.
    I shall translate Kierkegaard's account of the dangers and opportunities of what he called the Press into a critique of the Internet so as to raise the question: what contribution -- for good or ill -- can the World Wide Web, with its ability to deliver vast amounts of information to users all over the world, make to educators trying to pass on knowledge and to develop skills and wisdom in their students? I will then use Kierkegaard's three-stage answer to (...)
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  39. Hubert L. Dreyfus (1999). Anonymity Versus Commitment: The Dangers of Education on the Internet. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):369-378.
    I shall translate Kierkegaard's account of the dangers and opportunities of what he called the Press into a critique of the Internet so as to raise the question: what contribution -- for good or ill -- can the World Wide Web, with its ability to deliver vast amounts of information to users all over the world, make to educators trying to pass on knowledge and to develop skills and wisdom in their students? I will then use Kierkegaard's three-stage answer to (...)
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  40. Hubert L. Dreyfus (1999). Kierkegaard on the Internet: Anonymity Vs. Commitment in the Present Age. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 1999 (1):96-109.
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  41. Ben Fairweather, Steve Dixon & Edward Kingsley Trezise (1998). Business Ethics on the Internet: 3. Business Ethics: A European Review 7 (4):212-219.
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  42. N. Ben Fairweather & Steve Dixon (1998). Business Ethics on the Internet:. Business Ethics 7 (2):73–80.
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  43. N. Ben Fairweather & Derrol Hopewell (1997). Business Ethics on the Internet. Business Ethics 6 (3):125–133.
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  44. Luciano Floridi (1999). Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. Routledge.
    This accessible book explores the development, history and future of Information and Communication Technology using examples from philosophy. Luciano Floridi offers both an introduction to these technologies and a philosophical analysis of the problems they pose. The book examines a wide range of areas of technology, including the digital revolution, the Web and Internet, Artificial Intelligence and CD-ROMS. We see how the relationship between philosophy and computing provokes many crucial philosophical questions. Ultimately, Philosophy and Computing outlines what the future philosophy (...)
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  45. Eric Fouassier & Hélène van Den Brink (2009). Vente de Médicaments Sur Internet : Propositions de Modification du Code de la Santé Publique. Médecine Et Droit 2009 (95):68-73.
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  46. William A. Galston, Thomas C. Hilde, Lucas D. Introna, Peter Levine, Eric M. Uslaner, Helen Nissenbaum & Robert Wachbroit (2004). The Internet in Public Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The spread of new information and communications technologies during the past two decades has helped reshape civic associations, political communities, and global relations. In the midst of the information revolution, we find that the speed of this technology-driven change has outpaced our understanding of its social and ethical effects. The moral dimensions of this new technology and its effects on social bonds need to be questioned and scrutinized: Should the Internet be understood as a new form of public space and (...)
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  47. A. Gimmler (2001). Deliberative Democracy, the Public Sphere and the Internet. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (4):21-39.
    The internet could be an efficient political instrument if it were seen as part of a democracy where free and open discourse within a vital public sphere plays a decisive role. The model of deliberative democracy, as developed by Jürgen Habermas and Seyla Benhabib, serves this concept of democracy best. The paper explores first the model of deliberative democracy as a ‘two-track model’ in which representative democracy is backed by the public sphere and a developing civil society. Secondly, it outlines (...)
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  48. J. Glasgow (2010). Status of This Memo This Internet-Draft is Submitted to IETF in Full Conformance with the Provisions of BCP 78 and BCP 79. Internet-Drafts Are Working Documents of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), its Areas, and its Working Groups. Note That. [REVIEW] ARGUMENT 18 (1):5.
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  49. Barbara Gorayska & Jacob L. Mey (1996). Murphy's Surfers Or: Where is the Green? Lure and Lore on the Internet. [REVIEW] AI and Society 10 (3-4):233-258.
    In this paper, we explore some characteristics of the Information Superhighway and the World Wide Web metaphors in the light of the current developments in information technology. We propose that these characteristics constitute a form of conceptual slippage (often in the form of ‘lexical leakage’), which helps us detect and predict the tacit impact that the currently available information delivery systems are having on human cognition. We argue that the particular language associated with these systems evolves as a direct result (...)
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  50. John Gorman (1998). Monitoring Employee Internet Usage. Business Ethics 7 (1):21–24.
    Do employers know where their employees are going when they are provided with Internet and World Wide Web access? Should they know? Or is that a breach of privacy issue? Exploring this sensitive area is a former consultant for a software company, who is completing his MBA at London Business School.
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