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  1. E. M. Adams (2002). The Meaning of Life. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 51 (2):71-81.
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  2. R. T. Allen (1991). The Meaning of Life and Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (1):47–58.
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  3. Francis J. Ambrosio (2009). Philosophy, Religion, and the Meaning of Life. Teaching Co..
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  4. Ron Amundson (2010). Quality of Life, Disability, and Hedonic Psychology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (4):374-392.
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  5. Jami L. Anderson (2014). A Life Not Worth Living. In David P. Pierson (ed.), Breaking Bad: Critical Essays on the Contexts, Politics, Style, and Reception of the Television Series. Lexington Press. 103-118.
    What is so striking about Breaking Bad is how centrally impairment and disability feature in the lives of the characters of this series. It is unusual for a television series to cast characters with visible or invisible impairments. On the rare occasions that television shows do have characters with impairments, these characters serve no purpose other than to contribute to their ‘Otherness.’ Breaking Bad not only centralizes impairment, but impairment drives and sustains the story lines. I use three interrelated themes (...)
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  6. N. Athanassoulis (2005). Jeff McMahan, the Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life, New York, Oxford University Press, 2002, Pp. VII+540. Utilitas 17 (1):117-119.
  7. Julian Baggini (2005). What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    What is the meaning of life? It is a question that has intrigued the great philosophers--and has been hilariously lampooned by Monty Python. Indeed, the whole idea strikes many of us as vaguely pompous, a little absurd. Is there one profound and mysterious meaning to life, a single ultimate purpose behind human existence? In What's It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning. Instead, Baggini argues meaning can be found in a variety of ways, in this (...)
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  8. Philip Ball (2010). Making Life: A Comment on 'Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life' by Henk van den Belt (2009). NanoEthics 4 (2):129-132.
    Van den Belt recently examined the notion that synthetic biology and the creation of ‘artificial’ organisms are examples of scientists ‘playing God’. Here I respond to some of the issues he raises, including some of his comments on my previous discussions of the value of the term ‘life’ as a scientific concept.
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  9. David Benatar (ed.) (2009). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc..
    Introduction -- Part I: The meaning of life -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Thomas Nagel, The absurd -- Richard Hare, Nothing matters -- W.D. Joske, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- Robert Nozick, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- David Schmidtz, The meanings of life -- Part II: Creating people -- Derek Parfit, Whether causing someone to exist can benefit this person -- John Leslie, Why not let life ecome extinct? -- James Lenman, On becoming (...)
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  10. Lisa Bortolotti (2010). Agency, Life Extension, and the Meaning of Life. The Monist 93 (1):38-56.
    Contemporary philosophers and bioethicists argue that life extension is bad for the individual. According to the agency objection to life extension, being constrained as an agent adds to the meaningfulness of human life. Life extension removes constraints, and thus it deprives life of meaning. In the paper, I concede that constrained agency contributes to the meaningfulness of human life, but reject the agency objection to life extension in its current form. Even in an extended life, decision-making remains constrained, and many (...)
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  11. Lisa Bortolotti (2010). Agency, Life Extension, and the Meaning of Life. The Monist 93 (1):38-56.
    Contemporary philosophers and bioethicists argue that life extension is bad for the individual. According to the agency objection to life extension, being constrained as an agent adds to the meaningfulness of human life. Life extension removes constraints, and thus it deprives life of meaning. In the paper, I concede that constrained agency contributes to the meaningfulness of human life, but reject the agency objection to life extension in its current form. Even in an extended life, decision-making remains constrained, and many (...)
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  12. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2009). Philosophy and Happiness. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  13. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  14. Costica Bradatan (2011). On the Meaning of Life in the Age of the Most Meaningless Death. Angelaki 15 (3):67-85.
    (2010). On the Meaning of Life in the age of the Most Meaningless Death. Angelaki: Vol. 15, The Unbearable Charm of Fragility Philosophizing in/on Eastern Europe, pp. 67-85.
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  15. Raymond Bradley, The Meaning of Life Reflections on God, Immortality, and Free Will.
    Philosophers, and other thinking people, have long pondered three grand questions about the nature of reality and our status and significance within it.
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  16. Karl Britton (1969). Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. London, Cambridge U.P..
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  17. Berit Brogaard & Barry Smith (2005). On Luck, Responsibility and the Meaning of Life. Philosophical Papers 34 (3):443-458.
    A meaningful life, we shall argue, is a life upon which a certain sort of valuable pattern has been imposed by the person in question?a pattern which involves in serious ways the person having an effect upon the world. Meaningfulness is thus a special kind of value which a human life can bear. Two interrelated difficulties face ths proposal. One concerns responsiblity: how are we to account for the fact that a life that satisfies the above criteria can have more (...)
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  18. Wayne D. Christensen (2004). Representation and the Meaning of Life. In Hugh Clapin (ed.), Representation in Mind. Elsevier.
    Also published in Representation in mind : new approaches to mental representation / Hugh Clapin, Phillil Staines, Peter Slezak (eds.) : ISBN 008044394X.
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  19. Christopher Ciocchetti (2012). Veganism and Living Well. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):405-417.
    I argue that many philosophical arguments for veganism underestimate what is at stake for humans who give up eating animal products. By saying all that’s at stake for humans is taste and characterizing taste in simplistic terms, they underestimate the reasonable resistance that arguments for veganism will meet. Taste, they believe, is trivial. Omnivores, particular those that I label meaningful omnivores, disagree. They believe that eating meat provides a more meaningful meal, though just how this works proves elusive. Meaningful omnivores (...)
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  20. Claire Colebrook (2010). Deleuze and the Meaning of Life. Continuum.
    Introduction: The problem of vitalism : active/passive -- Brain, system, model : the affective turn -- Vitalism and theoria -- Inorganic art -- Inorganic vitalism -- The vital order after theory -- On becoming -- Living systems, extended minds, gaia -- Conclusion.
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  21. John Cottingham (2003). On the Meaning of Life. Routledge.
    The question "What is the meaning of life?" is one of the most fascinating, oldest and most difficult questions human beings have ever posed themselves. Often linked to the religious issue of whether we are part of a larger, divine scheme, even in an increasingly secularized culture it remains a question to which we are ineluctably and powerfully drawn. In this acute and thoughtful book, John Cottingham asks why the question vexes us so much and assesses some of the most (...)
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  22. Harry Lewis Custard (1967). Seeing Life Whole. Arlington, Va.,Unity of Knowledge Publications.
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  23. William H. Davis (1987). The Meaning of Life. Metaphilosophy 18 (3-4):288-305.
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  24. J. J. Degenaar (1986). Art and the Meaning of Life: These Lectures Were Presented at the 1986 Uct Summer School. Dept. Of Adult Education and Extra-Mural Studies, University of Cape Town.
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  25. Jacques Derrida (1993). Aporias: Dying--Awaiting (One Another at) the "Limits of Truth" (Mourir--S'attendre aux "Limites De La Vérité"). Stanford University Press.
    'My death - is it possible?' - That is the question asked, explored, and analysed in Jacques Derrida's new book. How is this question to be understood? How and by whom can it be asked, can it be quoted, can it be an appropriate question, and can it be asked in the appropriate moment, the moment of 'my death'? This book bears a special significance because in it Derrida focuses on an issue that has informed the whole of his work. (...)
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  26. Ulrich Diehl (2010). Che cos' e la disperazione? Un esperimento filosofico. In Gian Franco Frigo (ed.), Disperazione. Saggi sulla condizione umana tra filosofia, scienza e arte. Mimesis.
  27. Will Durant (1932). On the Meaning of Life. New York, R. Long & R.R. Smith, Inc..
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  28. Terry Eagleton (2008). The Meaning of Life: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    The phrase "the meaning of life" for many seems a quaint notion fit for satirical mauling by Monty Python or Douglas Adams. But in this spirited Very Short Introduction, famed critic Terry Eagleton takes a serious if often amusing look at the question and offers his own surprising answer. Eagleton first examines how centuries of thinkers and writers--from Marx and Schopenhauer to Shakespeare, Sartre, and Beckett--have responded to the ultimate question of meaning. He suggests, however, that it is only in (...)
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  29. Terry Eagleton (2007). The Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    The phrase "the meaning of life" for many seems a quaint notion fit for satirical mauling by Monty Python or Douglas Adams. But in this spirited, stimulating, and quirky enquiry, famed critic Terry Eagleton takes a serious if often amusing look at the question and offers his own surprising answer. Eagleton first examines how centuries of thinkers and writers--from Marx and Schopenhauer to Shakespeare, Sartre, and Beckett--have responded to the ultimate question of meaning. He suggests, however, that it is only (...)
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  30. J. Edward Barrett (1968). A Theology of the Meaning of Life. Zygon 3 (2):169-182.
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  31. Randolph M. Feezell (1981). The Meaning of Life. Teaching Philosophy 4 (1):83-85.
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  32. Herman Feifel (1959). The Meaning of Death. New York, Blakiston Division, Mcgraw-Hill.
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  33. Fred Feldman (1992). Confrontations with the Reaper: A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Death. Oxford University Press.
    What is death? Do people survive death? What do we mean when we say that someone is "dying"? Presenting a clear and engaging discussion of the classic philosophical questions surrounding death, this book studies the great metaphysical and moral problems of death. In the first part, Feldman shows that a definition of life is necessary before death can be defined. After exploring several of the most plausible accounts of the nature of life and demonstrating their failure, he goes on to (...)
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  34. Simon D. Feldman & Allan Hazlett, In Defense of Ambivalence.
    Harry Frankfurt (1988, 1998, 2004) defends an ethical ideal of wholeheartedness. We follow Frankfurt in distinguishing between ambivalence (a species of incoherence in desire) and wholeheartedness (the absence of ambivalence), but part ways with him by arguing against the idea that wholeheartedness is an ethical ideal. Our argument is based on cases of ethically valuable ambivalence – cases in which ambivalence contributes to the wellbeing of the ambivalent person.
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  35. Luc Ferry (2002). Man Made God: The Meaning of Life. University of Chicago Press.
    What happens when the meaning of life based on a divine revelation no longer makes sense? Does the quest for transcendence end in the pursuit of material success and self-absorption? Luc Ferry argues that modernity and the emergence of secular humanism in Europe since the eighteenth century have not killed the search for meaning and the sacred, or even the idea of God, but rather have transformed both through a dual process: the humanization of the divine and the divinization of (...)
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  36. John Martin Fischer (2005). Free Will, Death, and Immortality: The Role of Narrative. Philosophical Papers 34 (3):379-403.
    In this paper I explore in a preliminary way the interconnections among narrative explanation, narrative value, free will, an immortality. I build on the fascinating an suggestive work of David Velleman. I offer the hypothesis that our acting freely is what gives our lives a distinctive kind of value - narrative value. Free Will, then, is connected to the capacity to lead a meaningful life in a quite specific way: it is the ingredient which, when aded to others, enows us (...)
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  37. Owen J. Flanagan (1996). Self Expressions: Mind, Morals, and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.
    Human beings have the unique ability to consciously reflect on the nature of the self. But reflection has its costs. We can ask what the self is, but as David Hume pointed out, the self, once reflected upon, may be nowhere to be found. The favored view is that we are material beings living in the material world. But if so, a host of destabilizing questions surface. If persons are just a sophisticated sort of animal, then what sense is there (...)
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  38. Antony Flew (1963). Tolstoi and the Meaning of Life. Ethics 73 (2):110-118.
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  39. Philippe Gagnon (2010). Nietzsche Between the Eternal Return to Humanity and the Voice of the Many. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):383-411.
    Thus Spoke Zarathustra expresses a revolt against the quest for “afterworlds.” Nietzsche is seen transferring rationality to the body, welcoming the many in a kingdom of the un-unified multiple, with a burst of enthusiasm at the figure of recurrence. At first, he values an acceptation of suffering through reconciliation with time, and puts the onus on the divine to refute the dismembering of the oneness of meaning and unity of the soul’s quest for joy in eternity. Then confronting Christianity, he (...)
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  40. Tuvia Gelblum (1992). On 'the Meaning of Life' and the Bhagavad Git. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):121 – 130.
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  41. Neville Glasgow (ed.) (1995). Directions: New Zealanders Explore the Meaning of Life. Distributed by Macmillan New Zealand.
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  42. Sara Goering (2007). What Makes Suffering "Unbearable and Hopeless"? Advance Directives, Dementia and Disability. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):62-63.
  43. Jeffrey Gordon (1997). Kurosawa's Existential Masterpiece: A Mediation on the Meaning of Life. [REVIEW] Human Studies 20 (2):137-151.
    In the first part of the paper, I try to clarify the cluster of moods and questions we refer to generically as the problem of the meaning of life. I propose that the question of meaning emerges when we perform a spontaneous transcendental reduction on the phenomenon my life, a reduction that leaves us confronting an unjustified and unjustifiable curiosity. In Part 2, I turn to the film ikiru, Kurosawa''s masterpiece of 1952, for an existentialist resolution of the problem.
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  44. William Grey (1987). Evolution and the Meaning of Life. Zygon 22 (4):479-496.
  45. Dorothy Grover (1989). Posthumous Harm. Philosophical Quarterly 39 (156):334-353.
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  46. James G. Hanink (1987). Evolution, Morality, and the Meaning of Life. New Scholasticism 61 (4):485-490.
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  47. Larry D. Harwood (1997). The View From Nowhere and the Meaning of Life in Thomas Nagel. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 4 (3):19-23.
    Thomas Nagel contends that the actual philosophical problem in the meaning of life is the independent world we live in, and only requires a self-transcendent being who glimpses an independent world. I argue that Nagel is mistaken to think that self-transcendence evokes the same anxiety for humans living in the world of Dante as Darwin. Nagel’s view from nowhere is rather a modem version of the world. Secondly, while I concede that there is a common anxiety felt by self-transcendence in (...)
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  48. Peter Heinegg (ed.) (2003). Mortalism: Readings on the Meaning of Life. Prometheus Books.
  49. Bennett W. Helm (2000). Emotional Reason How to Deliberate About Value. American Philosophical Quarterly 37 (1):1-22.
    Deliberation about personal, non-moral values involves elements of both invention and discovery. Thus, we invent our values by freely choosing them, where such distinctively human freedom is essential to our defining and taking responsibility for the kinds of persons we are; nonetheless, we also discover our values insofar as we can deliberate about them rationally and arrive at non-arbitrary decisions about what has value in our lives. Yet these notions of invention and discovery seem inconsistent with each other, and the (...)
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  50. R. W. Hepburn (1982). Optimism, Finitude, and the Meaning of Life. In Donald MacKenzie MacKinnon, Brian Hebblethwaite & Stewart R. Sutherland (eds.), The Philosophical Frontiers of Christian Theology: Essays Presented to D.M. Mackinnon. Cambridge University Press.
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