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  1. Valentin Ageyev (2008). Creative Education as a Method of “Production” a Man as Subject of Own History. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:7-11.
    The cause of contemporary education is a subject-object relation of the society to man. There are two possible types of education constructed on the basis of this relation: cultural-oriented and social-oriented. None of this two types can solve the problem of a man as a subject of own history. Creative type of education based оn a subject-subject relation can solve this problem.
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  2. Scott F. Aikin, Michael Harbour & Robert B. Talisse (2010). Nagel on Public Education and Intelligent Design. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:209-219.
    In a recent article, Thomas Nagel argues against the court’s decision to strike down the Dover school district’s requirement that biology teachers in Dover public schools inform their students about Intelligent Design. Nagel contends that this ruling relies on questionable demarcation between science and nonscience and consequently misapplies the Establishment Clause of the constitution. Instead, he argues in favor of making room for an open discussion of these issues rather than an outright prohibition against Intelligent Design. We contend that Nagel’s (...)
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  3. Richard Andrews (2009). The Importance of Argument in Education. Institute of Education, University of London.
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  4. Shujun Bao & Ke Zhang (2012). Xianglan Zhang. Transformation of Thinking on Modern Education: From Entity to Process. Process Studies 41 (1):181-182.
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  5. Isaac Baer Berkson (1940). Preface to an Educational Philosophy. New York, Columbia University Press.
    The nature of educational philosophy.--Democracy as a social philosophy.--Aspects of a reconstructed educational policy.--References (p. [231]-238).
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  6. Arthur Eugene Bestor (1953). Educational Wastelands. Urbana, University of Iilinois Press.
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  7. Nicholas C. Burbules & Richard Smith (2005). 'What It Makes Sense to Say': Wittgenstein, Rule-Following and the Nature of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):425–430.
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  8. Galit Caduri (2013). On the Epistemology of Narrative Research in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (1):37-52.
    The purpose of this article is to explore the epistemological foundations of narrative research in education. In particular, I seek to explain how one can obtain knowledge, given its origin in teachers' subjective experiences. The problem with rhetorical and aesthetic criteria that narrative researchers use to warrant their knowledge claims is not that they don't meet a correspondence criterion of truth as post-positivists contend, but rather that they fail to connect teachers' ethical views with their practice. Since narrative research is (...)
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  9. H. G. Callaway (1996). Education and the Unity of the Person. Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (June):43-50.
    The deeper meaning of education, says Dewey in his Human Nature and Conduct (1922), which distinguishes the justly honored profession from that of mere trainer, is that a future new society of changed purposes and desires may be created by a deliberately humane treatment of the impulses of youth (p. 69). For Dewey, a truly humane education consists in an intelligent direction of native activities in the light of the possibilities and necessities of the social situation (p. 70). Student impulse (...)
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  10. Yong-Sock Chang & Ji–Young Kim (2008). Visual Culture Education Through the Philosophy for Children Program. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:27-34.
    The appearance of mass media and a versatile medium of videos can serve the convenience and instructive information for children; on the other hand, it could abet them in implicit image consumption. Now is the time for kids' to be in need of thinking power which enables them to make a choice, applications andcriticism of information within such visual cultures. In spite of these social changes, the realities are that our curriculum still doesn't meet a learner's demand properly. This research, (...)
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  11. John L. Childs (1956). American Pragmatism and Education. New York, Holt.
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  12. Ben Colburn (2012). Responsibility and School Choice in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):207-222.
    Consider the following argument for school choice, based on an appeal to the virtues of the market: allowing parents some measure of choice over their particular children's education ultimately serves the interests of all children, because creating a market mechanism in state education will produce improvements through the same pressures that lead to greater efficiency and quality when markets are deployed in more familiar contexts. The argument fails, because it is committed to a principle of equal concern, which (after analysis) (...)
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  13. John Frank Dame (1938). Naturalism in Education--Its Meaning and Influence. [Philadelphia.
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  14. Tara Fenwick & Richard Edwards (2011). Considering Materiality in Educational Policy: Messy Objects and Multiple Reals. Educational Theory 61 (6):709-726.
    Educational analysts need new ways to engage with policy processes in a networked world of complex transnational connections. In this discussion, Tara Fenwick and Richard Edwards argue for a greater focus on materiality in educational policy as a way to trace the heterogeneous interactions and precarious linkages that enact policy as complex manifestations. In particular, Fenwick and Edwards point to the methodologies of actor-network theory (ANT), at least in its most recent permutations, as a useful approach to materiality in policy (...)
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  15. Chris Fraser (2006). Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and the Paradoxical Nature of Education. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (4):529–542.
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  16. Peter Garik & Yann Benétreau-Dupin (2014). Report on a Boston University Conference December 7–8, 2012 on 'How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?'. Science and Education 23 (9):1853–1873.
    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 (...)
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  17. Dakmara Georgescu (2008). Philosophical “Paradigms” of Education. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:43-55.
    The paper explores the links between philosophy and learning with a view to highlight some of the today’s most influential philosophical “paradigms” of education. The concepts of “paradigm” and “philosophical paradigm of education” are discussed – and nuanced - based on some explicit references to them in the current philosophical and pedagogical literature. While taking into account all the different ways in which philosophy may be inquired with regard to its influence on education, the paper focuses merely on philosophical contributions (...)
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  18. Tal Gilead (2012). Rousseau, Happiness, and the Economic Approach to Education. Educational Theory 62 (3):267-285.
    Since the 1960s, the influence of economic thought on education has been steadily increasing. Taking Jean-Jacques Rousseau's educational thought as a point of departure, Tal Gilead critically inquires into the philosophical foundations of what can be termed the economic approach to education. Gilead's focus in this essay is on happiness and the role that education should play in promoting it. The first two parts of the essay provide an introduction to Rousseau's conception of happiness, followed by an examination of the (...)
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  19. Ken Gnanakan (2011). Integrated Learning. OUP India.
    This book upholds the idea of learning and education as a means to individual development and social empowerment. It presents a holistic picture, looking at learning as an integral part of one's social and physical life. Strongly differing from existing classroom perspectives, the book analyses integrated learning at its broadest possible imperative-arguing for a spontaneous learning environment within real-life contexts. -/- The book broadly covers: " Creativity in classroom education with a focus on interdisciplinary approach and positive teacher-student interaction " (...)
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  20. Vadim Grekhnev (2006). Philosophy Solving the Problems of Education in the Modern World. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:45-50.
    This paper deals with an analysis of philosophy as intellectual therapeutics for educational (pedagogical) activity. Two interrelated issues are examined: (1) philosophy's role in the construction of cognitive attitudes to all systems of education; (2) philosophy's role in the formation of a definite value attitude to education. A great deal of attention is devoted to the problem of educational goals. It is argued that the assumed dichotomy of the social and the individual (which still occurs in our teaching practice and (...)
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  21. Morwenna Griffiths (2013). Re-Thinking the Relevance of Philosophy of Education for Educational Policy Making. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-14.
  22. Morwenna Griffiths (2012). Is It Possible to Live a Philosophical, Educational Life in Education, Nowadays? Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):397-413.
    I consider if and how far it is possible to live an educational philosophical life, in the fast-changing, globalised world of Higher Education. I begin with Socrates’ account of a philosophical life in the Apology. I examine some tensions within different conceptions of what it is to do philosophy. I then go on to focus more closely on what it might be to live a philosophical, educational life in which educational processes and outcomes are influenced by philosophy, using examples taken (...)
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  23. Frederick C. Gruber (1957). Foundations of Education. University of Pennsylvania Press.
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  24. Charles W. Harvey (2010). The Conservative Limits of Liberal Education. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (2):30-36.
    I argue that hopes and claims about the liberating power of liberal education are typically exaggerated, naive and wrong. Reflecting upon and borrowing terms from Jim Shelton's essay on "The Subversive Nature of Liberal Education," I use the work of Ivan Illich, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron to argue that social education—training in efficient and productive consumeristic life—absorbs, muffles and domesticates any radical content liberal arts education may manage to provide. As with virtually all education, liberal education conserves (...)
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  25. R. W. Hildreth (2011). What Good is Growth?: Reconsidering Dewey on the Ends of Education. Education and Culture 27 (2):28-47.
    Dewey famously argues that the end of education is growth. This basic idea, widely criticized and often misunderstood, rests on a series of more complex arguments about the nature of education, human experience, and social life. First, Dewey understands education as the reconstruction of experience. As such, there is an intimate and inextricable relation between a person’s life experiences on one side and educational methods, content, and ends on the other. We learn by gaining a better sense of the meaning (...)
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  26. M. Andrew Holowchak (2013). The Paradox of Public Service Jefferson, Education, and the Problem of Plato's Cave. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):73-86.
    Plato noticed a sizeable problem apropos of establishing his republic—that there was always a ready pool of zealous potential rulers, lying in wait for a suitable opportunity to rule on their own tyrannical terms. He also recognized that those persons best suited to rule, those persons with foursquare and unimpeachable virtue, would be least motivated to govern. Ruling a polis meant that those persons, fully educated and in complete realization that the most complete happiness comprises solitary study of things unchanging, (...)
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  27. Eun-Sook Hong (2008). Reconstructing the Concept of 'Education as Initiation Into Practices'. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:107-114.
    In the 1990s P.H. Hirst criticizes his influential forms of knowledge theory, suggesting a new concept of education. In this paper I explain why Hirst suggests the new concept of ‘education as initiation into practices’. Although the latter Hirst’s position had positive implications on education, it is frequently confused with theutilitarian position. In order to provide a more coherent concept of education, I compare basic features of the rationalist (R), the utilitarian (U), and the practices-based (P) approach. Then I discuss (...)
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  28. Kai Horsthemke (2010). Rethinking Humane Education. Ethics and Education 4 (2):201-214.
    The increase in violence in South African schools, as elsewhere, has been associated with a general 'decline in moral values'. There have been three different responses that emphasise the decline in religious teaching at schools, the loss of traditional values like ubuntu , communalism and the like; and humankind's increasing alienation from nature. In other words, in terms of teaching and learning initiatives, we should turn to religion, community and the common good and nature (the natural environment and nonhuman animals) (...)
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  29. Arthur Valentine Judges (1957). Education and the Philosophic Mind. London, Harrap.
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  30. Tasos Kazepides (2012). Education as Dialogue. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):913-925.
    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common virtues; defends dialogue as a normative concept and interprets the principles of dialogue as extensions of its prerequisite virtues. Finally, it examines (...)
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  31. Salahaddin Khalilov (2006). Peculiarities of Education in the East and the West. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:73-77.
    There are essential differences between the Eastern and Western models of education. The Eastern model of education aims at the perfecting of an individual to reach his moral purity. Therefore it applies teaching and teacher-student relations on the individual scale, and primarily prefers didactics. The Western model of education considers an individual as a product of the social environment. Therefore it aims at the perfection of the environment itself, of the society, and so it concentrates its attention on socio-economic reforms (...)
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  32. Tina Kindeberg (2012). The Significance of Emulation in the Oral Interaction Between Teacher and Students. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (4):99-111.
    The lack of attention to the role of emotions generally has led modern learning theories to neglect the importance of emulation as a pedagogical support to students’ learning. One reason could be that the influence of teacher personality is not considered in relation to learning outcome. Another reason may be that the concept of emulation has been used as a psychological conception for one-way transmission. From a pedagogical rhetorical perspective, it is here argued that emulation and its pedagogical function is (...)
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  33. George F. Kneller (1958). Existentialism and Education. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  34. Lawrence Lengbeyer (1990). The Problem with Highlighters. Academic Questions 3 (3):65-70.
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  35. Grahame Lock & Chris Lorenz (2007). Revisiting the University Front. Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (5):405-418.
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  36. Nicholas Maxwell (2005). Philosophy Seminars for Five-Year-Olds,. Learning for Democracy 1 (2):71-77.
    We need a revolution in education, from five year olds onwards, so that exploration of problems is at the heart of the enterprise.
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  37. Gregory M. Nixon (2012). You Are Not Your Brain: Against 'Teaching to the Brain'. Review of Higher Education and Self-Learning 5 (15):69-83.
    Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation for student learning in general. I argue that identifying the person with the brain is scientism (not science), that the brain is not the person, and that it is the (...)
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  38. Stefano Oliverio (2014). The New Alliance Between Science and Education: Otto Neurath's Modernity Beyond Descartes' 'Adamitic' Science. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):41-59.
    Starting from a suggestion of Stephen Toulmin and through an interpretation of the criticism to which Neurath, one of the founders of the Vienna Circle, submits Descartes’ views on science, the paper attempts to outline a pattern of modernity opposed to the Cartesian one, that has been obtaining over the last four centuries. In particular, it is argued that a new alliance has to be established between science and education, overcoming Descartes’ banishment against education. In a Neurathian perspective education is (...)
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  39. Nick Peim (2013). Education, Schooling, Derrida's Marx and Democracy: Some Fundamental Questions. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (2):171-187.
    Beginning with a reconsideration of what the school is and has been, this paper explores the idea of the school to come. Emphasizing the governmental role of education in modernity, I offer a line of thinking that calls into question the assumption of both the school and education as possible conduits for either democracy or social justice. Drawing on Derrida’s spectral ontology I argue that any automatic correlation of education with democracy is misguided: especially within redemptive discourses that seek to (...)
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  40. Michael Peters, Paulo Ghiraldelli, Berislav Žarnić, Andrew Gibbons & Tina Besley (eds.) (1999). Encyclopaedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory. University of Split and PESA.
    The Encyclopaedia of Philosophy of Education contains surveys of philosophical theories of education and philosophical analyses of educational issues. The Encyclopaedia of Philosophy of Education is a dynamic study space for students, teachers, researchers and professionals in the field of education, philosophy and social sciences offering theoretically concurrent expositions of the topics of theoretical and practical interest in philosophy and education.
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  41. Ann Margaret Sharp (1986). Is There an Essence of Education? Journal of Moral Education 15 (3):189-196.
  42. Ralph Alexander Smith (ed.) (1970). Aesthetic Concepts and Education. Urbana,University of Illinois Press.
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  43. Max Stirner (1967). The False Principle of Our Education: Or, Humanism and Realism. Colorado Springs, R. Myles.
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  44. John A. Stoops (1971). Philosophy and Education in Western Civilization. Danville, Ill.,Interstate Printers & Publishers.
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  45. John A. Stoops (1969). The Education of Inner Man. Danville, Ill.,Interstate Printers & Publishers.
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  46. Peter Pericles Trifonas & Michael Peters (eds.) (2003/2004). Derrida, Deconstruction, and Education: Ethics of Pedagogy and Research. Blackwell.
    This book takes as a premise that Derrida is a profound educational thinker, who from the very beginning concerned himself with questions of pedagogy.
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  47. Gretchen Osgood Warren (1943). Art, Nature, Education. [Cambridge]Fogg Museum of Art, Harvard University.
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  48. Kenneth R. Westphal (2012). ‘Norm Acquisition, Rational Judgment and Moral Particularism’. Theory and Research in Education 10 (1):3--25.
    This paper argues that moral particularism, defined as the view that moral judgment does not require moral principles, depends upon a constricted and untenable view of rational judgment as simple syllogistic ratiocination. This I demonstrate by re-examining Nussbaum’s (1986/2002) case for particularism based on Sophocles’ Antigone. The central role of principles in moral judgment and in educational theory is supported by explicating ‘mature judgment’, which highlights key features of Thomas Green’s account of norm acquisition and of Kant’s account of the (...)
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  49. John White (2008). Education. In D. Crook & G. McCulloch (eds.), The Routledge International Encyclopedia of Education. Routledge.
    A short encyclopaedia entry on the nature of education.
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