Bookmark and Share

The Nature of Perceptual Experience

Edited by Benj Hellie (University of Toronto, University of Toronto at Scarborough)
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:
983 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 983
Material to categorize
  1. Richard I. Aaron (1957). The Common Sense View of Sense-Perception: The Presidential Address. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 58:1 - 14.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. W. P. Alston (forthcoming). The Theory of Appearing. Philosophical Perspectives.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. William P. Alston (1999). Back to the Theory of Appearing. Philosophical Perspectives 13 (s13):181--203.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. David M. Armstrong (1976). Immediate Perception. In R. S. Cohen, P. K. Feyerabend & M. Wartofsky (eds.), Essays in Memory of Imre Lakatos. Reidel. 23--35.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David M. Armstrong (1955). Illusions of Sense. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 33 (August):88-106.
  6. Ignacio Ávila (2015). Perceiving the Intrinsic Properties of Objects. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):55-71.
    In this paper, I discuss Noë’s enactive account of our perceptual encounter with the intrinsic properties of the surrounding objects. First, I argue that this view falls into a dilemma in which either we are left without a satisfactory explanation of this encounter or, in order to keep Noë’s view, we must abandon our ordinary intuitions about the ontological status of the intrinsic properties of objects. Then, I show that, strikingly, there is a suggestive unofficial strand running in Noë that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alexander Bagattini & Marcus Willaschek (2006). John McDowell by Maximilian de Gaynesford and John McDowell by Tim Thornton. Philosophical Books 47 (3):281-284.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Nikunja Vihari Banerjee (1930). Some Suggestions Towards the Construction of a Theory of Sense-Perception. Philosophical Review 39 (6):587-596.
  9. M. Beaton (2013). Phenomenology and Embodied Action. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):298-313.
    Context: The enactivist tradition, out of which neurophenomenology arose, rejects various internalisms – including the representationalist and information-processing metaphors – but remains wedded to one further internalism: the claim that the structure of perceptual experience is directly, constitutively linked only to internal, brain-based dynamics. Problem: I aim to reject this internalism and defend an alternative analysis. Method: The paper presents a direct-realist, externalist, sensorimotor account of perceptual experience. It uses the concept of counterfactual meaningful action to defend this view against (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Steven E. Boër (1974). Cornman on Designation Rules. Philosophical Studies 26 (3-4):271 - 278.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Brandom (2010). Reply to McDowell. In Bernhard Weiss & Jeremy Wanderer (eds.), Reading Brandom: On Making It Explicit. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Wylie Breckenridge, A New Defence of the Adverbial Theory.
    I present a new version of the adverbial theory of visual experience, and give a semantic argument for it.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Richard Brown, Kant, Polysolipsism, and the Real Unity of Experience.
    The question I am interested in revolves around Kant’s notion of the unity of experience. My central claim will be that, apart from the unity of experiencings and the unity of individual substances, there is a third unity: the unity of Experience. I will argue that this third unity can be conceived of as a sort of ‘experiential space’ with the Aesthetic and Categories as dimensions. I call this ‘Euclidean Experience’ to emphasize the idea that individual experiencings have a ‘location’ (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Panayot Butchvarov (1994). Direct Realism Without Materialism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):1-21.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John Campbell (2008). Sensorimotor Knowledge and Naïve Realism. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):666-673.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jack C. Carloye (1977). Cornman's Definition of Observation Terms. Philosophical Studies 32 (3):283 - 292.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Victoria Choy (1982). The Philosophy of James W. Cornman. Philosophical Studies 41 (1):7 - 29.
  18. P. Rowntree Clifford (1964). Direct, Referential Realism : A Comment. Dialogue 2 (04):452-453.
  19. Daniel Cory (1942). The Transition From Naïve to Critical Realism. Journal of Philosophy 39 (10):261-268.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Tim Crane (2006). U čemu je problem opažanja? Filozofska Istrazivanja 26 (2):257-282.
    Što je distinktivno filozofski problem opažanja? Ovdje se tvrdi da je to konflikt između prirode opažajnog iskustva kakva nam se intuitivno čini, te stanovitih mogućnosti koje su implicitne upravo u ideji iskustva: mogućnosti iluzije i halucinacije. Opažajno iskustvo čini nam se kao odnos prema svojim objektima, vrsta »otvorenosti prema svijetu« koja uključuje izravnu svijest postojećih objekata i njihovih svojstava. Ali ako netko može imati iskustvo iste vrste a da objekt nije tamo – halucinaciju objekta – onda izgleda da opažajno iskustvo (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Barry Dainton (2008). Sensing Change. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):362-384.
    We can anticipate what is yet to happen, remember what has already happened, but our immediate experience is confined to the present, the here and now. So much seems common sense. So much so that it is no surprise to see Thomas Reid, that pre-eminent champion of common sense in philosophy, advocating precisely this position.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Raffaella De Rosa (2010). Descartes and the Puzzle of Sensory Representation. Oup Oxford.
    Raffaella De Rosa discusses the theory of sensory perception, especially color perception, offered by Ren Descartes. She offers a detailed overview of the recent literature on the topic and provides a new reading of Descartes' theory; she also raises questions of great interest in the contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive science.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Sandra M. Dingli (forthcoming). On Thinking and the World: John McDowell's. Mind And.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Zoltan Domotor & Michael Friedman (1982). Cornman and Philosophy of Science. Philosophical Studies 41 (1):115 - 127.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. H. Havelock Ellis (1884). Hinton's Later Thought. Mind 9 (35):384-405.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alberto Gatti (2007). Chapter Eleven Sensing and Thinking Through Technological Tools. In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Pub.. 164.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Andrea Gaugusch & Bill Seaman (2004). (Re)Sensing the Observer: Offering an Open Order Cybernetics. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 2 (1):17-31.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Ravi Gomatam, Physics and Commonsense.
    Broadly stated, naïve realism is the attitude that the form of our outer experiences directly and literally correspond to the structure of the real world underlying these experiences. Naïve realism permeates our everyday thinking about, and ordinary language description of, the macroscopic world. It has undeniable pragmatic justification. However, as Descartes recognized centuries ago, philosophically speaking, naïve realism requires a justification. Physicists, nevertheless, simply assume naïve realism in interpreting the laboratory observations realistically. Thus, physicists do not find the philosophical issues (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. M. S. Gram (1972). Causation and Direct Realism. Philosophy of Science 39 (3):388-396.
  30. Lewis E. Hahn (1942). Psychological Data and Philosophical Theory of Perception. Journal of Philosophy 39 (11):296-301.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. H. Havelock Ellis (1884). III. —Hinton's Later Thought. Mind 35 (35):384-405.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. H. Havelock Ellis (1884). III. —Hinton's Later Thought. Mind (35):384-405.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Geoffrey M. Henebry (2011). Making Sense of Remotely Sensing Vegetation. BioScience 61 (7):568-569.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Geoffrey M. Henebry (2011). Making Sense of Remotely Sensing VegetationRemote Sensing of Vegetation: Principles, Techniques, and Applications. Hamlyn G. Jones and Robin A. Vaughan . Oxford University Press, 2010. 400 Pp., Illus. $55.00 (ISBN 9780199207794 Paper). [REVIEW] BioScience 61 (7):568-569.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Christoph Hoerl (2013). 'A Succession of Feelings, in and of Itself, is Not a Feeling of Succession'. Mind 122 (486):373-417.
    Variants of the slogan that a succession of experiences (in and of itself) does not amount to an experience of succession are commonplace in the philosophical literature on temporal experience. I distinguish three quite different arguments that might be captured using this slogan: the individuation argument, the unity argument, and the causal argument. Versions of the unity and the causal argument are often invoked in support of a particular view of the nature of temporal experience sometimes called intentionalism, and against (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Frank Jackson (1975). Symposium: The Adverbial Theory of Perception. On the Adverbial Analysis of Visual Experience. Metaphilosophy 6 (2):127–135.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Roy A. Jackson (1999). Sensing the Divine. The Philosophers' Magazine 5 (5):32-33.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Carolyn Dicey Jennings (forthcoming). Attention and Perceptual Organization. Philosophical Studies:1-14.
    How does attention contribute to perceptual experience? Within cognitive science, attention is known to contribute to the organization of sensory features into perceptual objects, or “object-based organization.” The current paper tackles a different type of organization and thus suggests a different role for attention in conscious perception. Within every perceptual experience we find that more subjectively interesting percepts stand out in the foreground, whereas less subjectively interesting percepts are relegated to the background. The sight of a sycamore often gains the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. A. H. Johnson (1973). Experiential Realism. New York,Humanities Press.
  40. L. K. (1978). James W. Cornman. Philosophical Studies 34 (4):333-334.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Pekka Kärkkäinen (2011). Sense Perception, Theories Of. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 1182--1185.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John B. Kent (1931). Dr. Hasan's Direct Realism. The Monist 41 (1):140-153.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. S. Albert Kivinen (2008). On Armstrong's Philosophy of Perception. Acta Philosophica Fennica 84:201.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. George P. Klubertanz (1966). "Perceiving, Sensing, and Knowing," Ed. With Introd. By Robert J. Swartz. Modern Schoolman 43 (3):320-320.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. K. L. (1978). In Memoriam: James W. Cornman. Philosophical Studies 34 (4):333 - 334.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Harold Langsam (2009). 11 The Theory of Appearing Defended. In Heather Logue & Alex Byrne (eds.), Disjunctivism: Contemporary Readings. Mit Press. 181.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Michael A. Lefsky, Warren B. Cohen, Geoffrey G. Parker & David J. Harding (2002). Lidar Remote Sensing for Ecosystem Studies Lidar, an Emerging Remote Sensing Technology That Directly Measures the Three-Dimensional Distribution of Plant Canopies, Can Accurately Estimate Vegetation Structural Attributes and Should Be of Particular Interest to Forest, Landscape, and Global Ecologists. BioScience 52 (1):19-30.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Keith Lehrer (1982). In Memoriam: James W. Cornman. Philosophical Studies 41 (1):3 - 4.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Keith Lehrer (1982). James W. Cornman. Philosophical Studies 41 (1):3-4.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. H. D. Lewis (1938). Naïve Realism and a Passage in the Theaetetus. Mind 47 (187):351-356.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 983