Bookmark and Share

The Nature of Sets

Edited by Rafal Urbaniak (University of Ghent, University of Gdansk)
Related categories
Subcategories:
152 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 152
Material to categorize
  1. S. I. Adi͡an (ed.) (1977). Mathematical Logic, the Theory of Algorithms, and the Theory of Sets. American Mathematical Society.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Tatiana Arrigoni (2011). V = L and Intuitive Plausibility in Set Theory. A Case Study. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 17 (3):337-360.
    What counts as an intuitively plausible set theoretic content (notion, axiom or theorem) has been a matter of much debate in contemporary philosophy of mathematics. In this paper I develop a critical appraisal of the issue. I analyze first R. B. Jensen's positions on the epistemic status of the axiom of constructibility. I then formulate and discuss a view of intuitiveness in set theory that assumes it to hinge basically on mathematical success. At the same time, I present accounts of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Tatiana Arrigoni & Sy-David Friedman (2013). The Hyperuniverse Program. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 19 (1):77-96.
    The Hyperuniverse Program is a new approach to set-theoretic truth which is based on justifiable principles and leads to the resolution of many questions independent from ZFC. The purpose of this paper is to present this program, to illustrate its mathematical content and implications, and to discuss its philosophical assumptions.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jeremy Avigad, Philosophy of Mathematics.
    The philosophy of mathematics plays an important role in analytic philosophy, both as a subject of inquiry in its own right, and as an important landmark in the broader philosophical landscape. Mathematical knowledge has long been regarded as a paradigm of human knowledge with truths that are both necessary and certain, so giving an account of mathematical knowledge is an important part of epistemology. Mathematical objects like numbers and sets are archetypical examples of abstracta, since we treat such objects in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jody Azzouni (1994). Metaphysical Myths, Mathematical Practice: The Ontology and Epistemology of the Exact Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    This original and exciting study offers a completely new perspective on the philosophy of mathematics. Most philosophers of mathematics try to show either that the sort of knowledge mathematicians have is similiar to the sort of knowledge specialists in the empirical sciences have or that the kind of knowledge mathematicians have, although apparently about objects such as numbers, sets, and so on, isn't really about those sorts of things as well. Jody Azzouni argues that mathematical knowledge really is a special (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. T. Baldwin, Sets Whose Members Might Not Exist + Essentialism Possible Worlds.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Yehoshua Bar-Hillel (ed.) (1970). Mathematical Logic and Foundations of Set Theory. Amsterdam,North-Holland Pub. Co..
    LN , so f lies in the elementary submodel M'. Clearly co 9 M' . It follows that 6 = {f(n): n em} is included in M'. Hence the ordinals of M' form an initial ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. J. Barwise & L. Moss (1991). Hypersets. The Mathematical Intelligencer 13:31-41.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Max Black (1971). The Elusiveness of Sets. Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):614 - 636.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ross T. Brady (2014). The Simple Consistency of Naive Set Theory Using Metavaluations. Journal of Philosophical Logic 43 (2-3):261-281.
    The main aim is to extend the range of logics which solve the set-theoretic paradoxes, over and above what was achieved by earlier work in the area. In doing this, the paper also provides a link between metacomplete logics and those that solve the paradoxes, by finally establishing that all M1-metacomplete logics can be used as a basis for naive set theory. In doing so, we manage to reach logics that are very close in their axiomatization to that of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John P. Burgess (2004). E Pluribus Unum: Plural Logic and Set Theory. Philosophia Mathematica 12 (3):193-221.
    A new axiomatization of set theory, to be called Bernays-Boolos set theory, is introduced. Its background logic is the plural logic of Boolos, and its only positive set-theoretic existence axiom is a reflection principle of Bernays. It is a very simple system of axioms sufficient to obtain the usual axioms of ZFC, plus some large cardinals, and to reduce every question of plural logic to a question of set theory.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David J. Chalmers, Is the Continuum Hypothesis True, False, or Neither?
    Thanks to all the people who responded to my enquiry about the status of the Continuum Hypothesis. This is a really fascinating subject, which I could waste far too much time on. The following is a summary of some aspects of the feeling I got for the problems. This will be old hat to set theorists, and no doubt there are a couple of embarrassing misunderstandings, but it might be of some interest to non professionals.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Roy T. Cook (2012). Impure Sets Are Not Located: A Fregean Argument. Thought 1 (3):219-229.
    It is sometimes suggested that impure sets are spatially co-located with their members (and hence are located in space). Sets, however, are in important respects like numbers. In particular, sets are connected to concepts in much the same manner as numbers are connected to concepts—in both cases, they are fundamentally abstracts of (or corresponding to) concepts. This parallel between the structure of sets and the structure of numbers suggests that the metaphysics of sets and the metaphysics of numbers should parallel (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. D. Corfield (2010). Understanding the Infinite I: Niceness, Robustness, and Realism. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (3):253-275.
    This paper treats the situation where a single mathematical construction satisfies a multitude of interesting mathematical properties. The examples treated are all infinitely large entities. The clustering of properties is termed ‘niceness’ by the mathematician Michiel Hazewinkel, a concept we compare to the ‘robustness’ described by the philosopher of science William Wimsatt. In the final part of the paper, we bring our findings to bear on the question of realism which concerns not whether mathematical entities exist as abstract objects, but (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter J. Eccles (1997). An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning: Lectures on Numbers, Sets, and Functions. Cambridge University Press.
    The purpose of this book is to introduce the basic ideas of mathematical proof to students embarking on university mathematics. The emphasis is on helping the reader in understanding and constructing proofs and writing clear mathematics. This is achieved by exploring set theory, combinatorics and number theory, topics which include many fundamental ideas which are part of the tool kit of any mathematician. This material illustrates how familiar ideas can be formulated rigorously, provides examples demonstrating a wide range of basic (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Solomon Feferman, Is the Continuum Hypothesis a Definite Mathematical Problem?
    The purpose of this article is to explain why I believe that the Continuum Hypothesis (CH) is not a definite mathematical problem. My reason for that is that the concept of arbitrary set essential to its formulation is vague or underdetermined and there is no way to sharpen it without violating what it is supposed to be about. In addition, there is considerable circumstantial evidence to support the view that CH is not definite.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. José Ferreiros Domínguez (1992). Sobre los orígenes de la Matemática abstracta. Theoria 7 (1-2):473-498.
    Dedekind used to refer to Riemann as his main model concerning mathematical methodology, particularly regarding the use of abstract notions as a basis for mathematical theories. So, in passages written in 1876 and 1895 he compared his approach to ideal theory with Riemann’s theory of complex functions. In this paper, I try to make sense of those declarations, showing the role of abstract notions in Riemann’s function theory, its influence on Dedekind, and the importance of the methodological principle of avoiding (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. José Ferreirós (2011). On Arbitrary Sets and ZFC. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 17 (3):361-393.
    Set theory deals with the most fundamental existence questions in mathematics—questions which affect other areas of mathematics, from the real numbers to structures of all kinds, but which are posed as dealing with the existence of sets. Especially noteworthy are principles establishing the existence of some infinite sets, the so-called “arbitrary sets.” This paper is devoted to an analysis of the motivating goal of studying arbitrary sets, usually referred to under the labels of quasi-combinatorialism or combinatorial maximality. After explaining what (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Peter Fletcher (1989). Nonstandard Set Theory. Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (3):1000-1008.
    Nonstandard set theory is an attempt to generalise nonstandard analysis to cover the whole of classical mathematics. Existing versions (Nelson, Hrbáček, Kawai) are unsatisfactory in that the unlimited idealisation principle conflicts with the wish to have a full theory of external sets. I re-analyse the underlying requirements of nonstandard set theory and give a new formal system, stratified nonstandard set theory, which seems to meet them better than the other versions.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Peter Forrest, Sets As Mereological Tropes.
    Either from concrete examples such as tomatoes on a plate, an egg carton full of eggs and so on, or simply because of the braces notation, we come to have some intuitions about the sorts of things sets might be. (See Maddy 1990.) First we tend to think of a set of particulars as itself a particular thing.. Second, even after the distinction between settheory and mereology has been carefully explained we tend to think of the members of a set (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomas Forster (2007). Implementing Mathematical Objects in Set Theory. Logique Et Analyse 50 (197):79-86.
    In general little thought is given to the general question of how to implement mathematical objects in set theory. It is clear that—at various times in the past—people have gone to considerable lengths to devise implementations with nice properties. There is a litera- ture on the evolution of the Wiener-Kuratowski ordered pair, and a discussion by Quine of the merits of an ordered-pair implemen- tation that makes every set an ordered pair. The implementation of ordinals as Von Neumann ordinals is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. A. A. Fraenkel, Y. Bar-Hillel & A. Levy (1973). Foundations of Set Theory. North Holland.
    HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION In Abstract Set Theory) the elements of the theory of sets were presented in a chiefly generic way: the fundamental concepts were ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Gottlob Frege (1980). The Foundations of Arithmetic: A Logico-Mathematical Enquiry Into the Concept of Number. Northwestern University Press.
    § i. After deserting for a time the old Euclidean standards of rigour, mathematics is now returning to them, and even making efforts to go beyond them. ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Harvey Friedman, The Mathematical Meaning of Mathematical Logic.
    Each of these theorems and concepts arose from very specific considerations of great general interest in the foundations of mathematics (f.o.m.). They each serve well defined purposes in f.o.m. Naturally, the preferred way to formulate them for mathe-matical logicians is in terms that are close to their roots in f.o.m.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Harvey M. Friedman, The Interpretation of Set Theory in Mathematical Predication Theory.
    This paper was referred to in the Introduction in our paper [Fr97a], “The Axiomatization of Set Theory by Separation, Reducibility, and Comprehension.” In [Fr97a], all systems considered used the axiom of Extensionality. This is appropriate in a set theoretic context.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. K. Grelling & L. Nelson (1907/1908). Bemerkungen Zu den Paradoxien von Russell Und Burali-Forti. Abhandlungen Der Fries'schen Schule (Neue Serie) 2:300-334.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kai Hauser (2013). Cantor's Absolute in Metaphysics and Mathematics. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (2):161-188.
    This paper explores the metaphysical roots of Cantor’s conception of absolute infinity in order to shed some light on two basic issues that also affect the mathematical theory of sets: the viability of Cantor’s distinction between sets and inconsistent multiplicities, and the intrinsic justification of strong axioms of infinity that are studied in contemporary set theory.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Kai Hauser (2010). Cantor's Concept of Set in the Light of Plato's Philebus. Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):783-805.
    In explaining his concept of set Cantor intimates a connection with the metaphysical scheme put forward in Plato’s Philebus to determine the place of pleasure. We argue that these determinations capture key ideas of Cantorian set theory and, moreover, extend to intuitions which continue to play a central role in the modern mathematics of infinity.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Greg Hjorth, Leigh Humphries & Arnold W. Miller (2013). Universal Sets for Pointsets Properly on the N Th Level of the Projective Hierarchy. Journal of Symbolic Logic 78 (1):237-244.
    The Axiom of Projective Determinacy implies the existence of a universal $\utilde{\Pi}^{1}_{n}\setminus\utilde{\Delta}^{1}_{n}$ set for every $n \geq 1$. Assuming $\text{\upshape MA}(\aleph_{1})+\aleph_{1}=\aleph_{1}^{\mathbb{L}}$ there exists a universal $\utilde{\Pi}^{1}_{1}\setminus\utilde{\Delta}^{1}_{1}$ set. In ZFC there is a universal $\utilde{\Pi}^{0}_{\alpha}\setminus\utilde{\Delta}^{0}_{\alpha}$ set for every $\alpha$.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Akihiro Kanamori (1996). The Mathematical Development of Set Theory From Cantor to Cohen. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 2 (1):1-71.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Juliette Kennedy (2009). Gödel's Modernism: On Set Theoretic Incompleteness, Revisited. In Sten Lindström, Erik Palmgren, Krister Segerberg & Viggo Stoltenberg-Hansen (eds.), Logicism, Intuitionism and Formalism: What has become of them? Springer.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Philip Kitcher (1983). The Nature of Mathematical Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    This book argues against the view that mathematical knowledge is a priori,contending that mathematics is an empirical science and develops historically,just as ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. G. Landini (2013). Zermelo and Russell's Paradox: Is There a Universal Set? Philosophia Mathematica 21 (2):180-199.
    Zermelo once wrote that he had anticipated Russell's contradiction of the set of all sets that are not members of themselves. Is this sufficient for having anticipated Russell's Paradox — the paradox that revealed the untenability of the logical notion of a set as an extension? This paper argues that it is not sufficient and offers criteria that are necessary and sufficient for having discovered Russell's Paradox. It is shown that there is ample evidence that Russell satisfied the criteria and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. G. Landini (2012). Michael Potter Tom Ricketts, Eds. The Cambridge Companion to Frege. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Isbn 978-0-521-62479-4. Pp. XVII+639. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 20 (3):372-387.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Shaughan Lavine (1995). Finite Mathematics. Synthese 103 (3):389 - 420.
    A system of finite mathematics is proposed that has all of the power of classical mathematics. I believe that finite mathematics is not committed to any form of infinity, actual or potential, either within its theories or in the metalanguage employed to specify them. I show in detail that its commitments to the infinite are no stronger than those of primitive recursive arithmetic. The finite mathematics of sets is comprehensible and usable on its own terms, without appeal to any form (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mary Leng, Alexander Paseau & Michael D. Potter (eds.) (2007). Mathematical Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    What is the nature of mathematical knowledge? Is it anything like scientific knowledge or is it sui generis? How do we acquire it? Should we believe what mathematicians themselves tell us about it? Are mathematical concepts innate or acquired? Eight new essays offer answers to these and many other questions. Written by some of the world's leading philosophers of mathematics, psychologists, and mathematicians, Mathematical Knowledge gives a lively sense of the current state of debate in this fascinating field. Contents 1. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Godehard Link (2000). Reductionism as Resource-Conscious Reasoning. Erkenntnis 53 (1-2):173-193.
    Reductivist programs in logicand philosophy, especially inthe philosophy of mathematics,are reviewed. The paper argues fora ``methodological realism'' towardsnumbers and sets, but still givesreductionism an important place,albeit in methodology/epistemologyrather than in ontology proper.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dennis Lomas (2002). What Perception is Doing, and What It is Not Doing, in Mathematical Reasoning. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (2):205-223.
    What is perception doing in mathematical reasoning? To address this question, I discuss the role of perception in geometric reasoning. Perception of the shape properties of concrete diagrams provides, I argue, a surrogate consciousness of the shape properties of the abstract geometric objects depicted in the diagrams. Some of what perception is not doing in mathematical reasoning is also discussed. I take issue with both Parsons and Maddy. Parsons claims that we perceive a certain type of abstract object. Maddy claims (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Laureano Luna & William Taylor (2010). Cantor's Proof in the Full Definable Universe. Australasian Journal of Logic 9:11-25.
    Cantor’s proof that the powerset of the set of all natural numbers is uncountable yields a version of Richard’s paradox when restricted to the full definable universe, that is, to the universe containing all objects that can be defined not just in one formal language but by means of the full expressive power of natural language: this universe seems to be countable on one account and uncountable on another. We argue that the claim that definitional contexts impose restrictions on the (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. David MacCallum (2000). Conclusive Reasons That We Perceive Sets. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (1):25 – 42.
    Penelope Maddy has defended a modified version of mathematical platonism that involves the perception of some sets. Frederick Suppe has developed a conclusive reasons account of empirical knowledge that, when applied to the sets of interest to Maddy, yields that we have knowledge of these sets. Thus, Benacerraf's challenge to the platonist to account for mathematical knowledge has been met, at least in part. Moreover, it is argued that the modalities involved in Suppe's conclusive reasons account of knowledge can be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Penelope Maddy (2005). Mathematical Existence. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 11 (3):351-376.
    Despite some discomfort with this grandly philosophical topic, I do in fact hope to address a venerable pair of philosophical chestnuts: mathematical truth and existence. My plan is to set out three possible stands on these issues, for an exercise in compare and contrast.' A word of warning, though, to philosophical purists (and perhaps of comfort to more mathematical readers): I will explore these philosophical positions with an eye to their interconnections with some concrete issues of set theoretic method.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Penelope Maddy (1982). Abstract of Comments: Mathematical Epistemology: What is the Question? Noûs 16 (1):106 - 107.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Penelope Maddy (1981). Sets and Numbers. Noûs 15 (4):495-511.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Claudio Majolino (2011). Splitting the Μονάς. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:187-213.
    This paper assesses the philosophical heritage of Jacob Klein’s thought through an analysis of the key tenets of his Greek Mathematical Thought and theOrigin of Algebra. Threads of Klein’s thought are distinguished and subsequently singled out (phenomenological, epistemological, and anti-ontological; historical, ontological, and critical), and the peculiar way in which Klein’s project brings together ontology and history of mathematics is investigated. Plato’s theoretical logistic and Klein’s understanding thereof are questioned—especially the claim that the Platonic distinction between practical and theoretical logistic (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. J. P. Mayberry (2000). The Foundations of Mathematics in the Theory of Sets. Cambridge University Press.
    This book will appeal to mathematicians and philosophers interested in the foundations of mathematics.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Mark McEvoy (2007). Kitcher, Mathematical Intuition, and Experience. Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):227-237.
    Mathematical apriorists sometimes hold that our non-derived mathematical beliefs are warranted by mathematical intuition. Against this, Philip Kitcher has argued that if we had the experience of encountering mathematical experts who insisted that an intuition-produced belief was mistaken, this would undermine that belief. Since this would be a case of experience undermining the warrant provided by intuition, such warrant cannot be a priori.I argue that this leaves untouched a conception of intuition as merely an aspect of our ordinary ability to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Gregory H. Moore (1980). Beyond First-Order Logic: The Historical Interplay Between Mathematical Logic and Axiomatic Set Theory. History and Philosophy of Logic 1 (1-2):95-137.
    What has been the historical relationship between set theory and logic? On the one hand, Zermelo and other mathematicians developed set theory as a Hilbert-style axiomatic system. On the other hand, set theory influenced logic by suggesting to Schröder, Löwenheim and others the use of infinitely long expressions. The questions of which logic was appropriate for set theory - first-order logic, second-order logic, or an infinitary logic - culminated in a vigorous exchange between Zermelo and Gödel around 1930.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Roman Murawski (2010). Philosophy of Mathematics in the Warsaw Mathematical School. Axiomathes 20 (2-3):279-293.
    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss the philosophical views concerning mathematics of the founders of the so called Warsaw Mathematical School, i.e., Wacław Sierpiński, Zygmunt Janiszewski and Stefan Mazurkiewicz. Their interest in the philosophy of mathematics and their philosophical papers will be considered. We shall try to answer the question whether their philosophical views influenced their proper mathematical investigations. Their views towards set theory and its rôle in mathematics will be emphasized.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Alex Oliver (1994). Are Subclasses Parts of Classes? Analysis 54 (4):215 - 223.
    The fundamental thesis of David Lewis's "Parts of Classes" is that the nonempty subsets of a set are mereological parts of it. This paper shows that Lewis's considerations in favor of this thesis are unpersuasive. First, common speech provides no support. Second, the formal analogy between mereology and the Boolean algebra of sets can be explained without accepting the thesis. Third, it is very doubtful that the thesis is fruitful. Certainly, Lewis's claim that it helps us understand set theory is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Kenneth Olson & Gilbert Plumer (2002). What Constitutes a Formal Analogy? In Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & Robert C. Pinto (eds.), Argumentation and its Applications [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation.
    There is ample justification for having analogical material in standardized tests for graduate school admission, perhaps especially for law school. We think that formal-analogy questions should compare different scenarios whose structure is the same in terms of the number of objects and the formal properties of their relations. The paper deals with this narrower question of how legitimately to have formal analogy test items, and the broader question of what constitutes a formal analogy in general.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 152