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  1. F. Michael Akeroyd (2003). Prediction and the Periodic Table: A Response to Scerri and Worrall. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 34 (2):337-355.
    In a lengthy article E. Scerri and J. Worrall (2001) put forward the case for a novel ‘accommodationist’ version of the events surrounding the development of Mendeleef's Periodic Table 1869–1899. However these authors lay undue stress on the fact that President of the Royal Society of London Spottiswoode made absolutely no mention of Mendeleef's famous predictions in the Davy Medal eulogy in 1883 and undue stress on the fact that Cleve's classic 1879 Scandium paper contained an acknowledgement of Mendeleef's prior (...)
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  2. Michael Akeroyd (2010). The Philosophical Significance of Mendeleev's Successful Predictions of the Properties of Gallium and Scandium. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):117-122.
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  3. Michael Akeroyd (2003). Predictions, Retrodictions and the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 5 (1):85-88.
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  4. Santiago Alvarez, Joaquim Sales & Miquel Seco (2008). On Books and Chemical Elements. Foundations of Chemistry 10 (2):79-100.
    The history of the classification of chemical elements is reviewed from the point of view of a bibliophile. The influence that relevant books had on the development of the periodic table and, conversely, how it was incorporated into textbooks, treatises and literary works, with an emphasis on the Spanish bibliography are analyzed in this paper. The reader will also find unexpected connections of the periodic table with the Bible or the architect Buckminster Fuller.
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  5. Nathan M. Brooks (2002). Developing the Periodic Law: Mendeleev's Work During 1869–1871. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 4 (2):127-147.
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  6. Stephen G. Brush (2007). Predictivism and the Periodic Table. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):256-259.
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  7. Joseph D. Sneed, Wolfgang Balzer & C.-U. Moulines (eds.) (2000). Structuralist Knowledge Representation: Paradigmatic Examples. Rodopi.
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  8. R. E. & J. Worrall (2001). Prediction and the Periodic Table. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (3):407-452.
    The debate about the relative epistemic weights carried in favour of a theory by predictions of new phenomena as opposed to accommodations of already known phenomena has a long history. We readdress the issue through a detailed re-examination of a particular historical case that has often been discussed in connection with it-that of Mendeleev and the prediction by his periodic law of the three 'new' elements, gallium, scandium and germanium. We find little support for the standard story that these predictive (...)
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  9. Sibel Erduran (2007). Breaking the Law: Promoting Domain-Specificity in Chemical Education in the Context of Arguing About the Periodic Law. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 9 (3):247-263.
    In this paper, domain-specificity is presented as an understudied problem in chemical education. This argument is unpacked by drawing from two bodies of literature: learning of science and epistemology of science, both themes that have cognitive as well as philosophical undertones. The wider context is students’ engagement in scientific inquiry, an important goal for science education and one that has not been well executed in everyday classrooms. The focus on science learning illustrates the role of domain specificity in scientific reasoning. (...)
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  10. Bretislav Friedrich (2004). ... Hasn't It? A Commentary on Eric Scerri's Paper ``has Quantum Mechanics Explained the Periodic Table?''. Foundations of Chemistry 6 (1):117-132.
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  11. Carmen Giunta (2005). Book Review:Michael D. Gordin: A Well-Ordered Thing: Dmitrii Mendeleev and the Shadow of the Periodic Table, Basic Books, New York, 2004, 364 + XX Pp., ISBN 0-465-02775-X, $30book Review. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):315-319.
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  12. Carmen J. Giunta (2001). Argon and the Periodic System: The Piece That Would Not Fit. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 3 (2):105-128.
    The discovery of the noble gases and their incorporation into the periodic system are examined in this paper. A chronology of experimental reports on argon and helium and the properties relevant to their nature and position in the periodic system is presented. Proposals on the nature of argon and helium that appeared in the aftermath of their discovery are examined in light of the various empirical and theoretical considerations that supported and contradicted them. ``The piece that would not fit'' refers (...)
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  13. W. P. Griffith (2010). The Group VIII Platinum-Group Metals and the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):17-25.
    The six platinum group metals (pgms: ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum) posed a number of problems for 19th-century chemists, including Mendeleev, for their Periodic classification. This account discusses the discovery of the pgms, the determination of their atomic weights and their classification.
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  14. Fathi Habashi (2010). Metals: Typical and Less Typical, Transition and Inner Transition. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):31-39.
    While most chemists agree on what is a metal and what is a non-metal there is a disagreement with respect to what is a metalloid and what is a transition metal. It is believed that this problem can be solved if two new terms are adopted: typical and less typical metals. These new terms will also help reconcile the European Periodic Table versus the North American regarding numbering of groups as well as the IUPAC numbering which could be as well (...)
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  15. Richard D. Harcourt (1999). The Atomic Shell-Structure Formula 2n. Foundations of Chemistry 1 (3):293-294.
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  16. Hinne Hettema (2012). Reducing Chemistry to Physics: Limits, Models, Consequences. Createspace.
    Chemistry and physics are two sciences that are hard to connect. Yet there is significant overlap in their aims, methods, and theoretical approaches. In this book, the reduction of chemistry to physics is defended from the viewpoint of a naturalised Nagelian reduction, which is based on a close reading of Nagel's original text. This naturalised notion of reduction is capable of characterising the inter-theory relationships between theories of chemistry and theories of physics. The reconsideration of reduction also leads to a (...)
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  17. Hinne Hettema (1988). Mendeleev's Periodic Table: Some Remarks on its Reduction. In Proceedings of the 13 Th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Hpt. 210-213.
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  18. Hinne Hettema (1988). Proceedings of the 13 Th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Hpt.
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  19. Hinne Hettema & Theo A. F. Kuipers (1988). The Periodic Table — its Formalization, Status, and Relation to Atomic Theory. Erkenntnis 28 (3):387-408.
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  20. Masanori Kaji (2003). Mendeleev's Discovery of the Periodic Law: The Origin and the Reception. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 5 (3):189-214.
    This paper addresses the conceptual as well as social origins of Mendeleev’s discovery of the periodic law and its reception by the chemical community by taking account of three factors: Mendeleev’s early research and its relevance to the discovery; his concepts of chemistry, especially that of the chemical elements; and the social context of the discovery and the reception in the chemical community. Mendeleev's clear distinction between abstract elements and simple bodies was a departure from Lavoisier’s famous definition of elements (...)
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  21. Maurice R. Kibler (2007). From the Mendeleev Periodic Table to Particle Physics and Back to the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 9 (3):221-234.
    We briefly describe in this paper the passage from Mendeleev’s chemistry (1869) to atomic physics (in the 1900’s), nuclear physics (in 1932) and particle physics (from 1953 to 2006). We show how the consideration of symmetries, largely used in physics since the end of the 1920’s, gave rise to a new format of the periodic table in the 1970’s. More specifically, this paper is concerned with the application of the group SO(4,2)⊗SU(2) to the periodic table of chemical elements. It is (...)
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  22. R. B. King & D. H. Rouvray (2006). Response of D. H. Rouvray and R. B. King, Editors of the Book “the Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century”. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 8 (3):305-306.
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  23. Helge Kragh (2001). The First Subatomic Explanations of the Periodic System. Foundations of Chemistry 3 (2):129-143.
    Attempts to explain the periodic system as a manifestation of regularities in the structure of the atoms of the elements are as old as the system itself. The paper analyses some of the most important of these attempts, in particular such works that are historically connected with the recognition of the electron as a fundamental building block of all matter. The history of the periodic system, the discovery of the electron, and ideas of early atomic structure are closely interwoven and (...)
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  24. Theo A. F. Kuipers & Hinne Hettema (1988). The Periodic Table - its Formalization, Status, and Relation to Atomic Theory. Erkenntnis 28 (3):387-408.
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  25. M. J. Laing (2010). The Question Mark at Uranium. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):27-30.
    Being excerpts from pages 187, 203, 204, 207, 208, 209, 210 and 211 of Uncle Tungsten , extracted by Michael Laing with the consent of the author, Professor Oliver Sacks, and Picador Publishers.
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  26. Michael Laing (2011). Sam Kean: The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World From the Periodic Table of the Elements. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):77-77.
    Sam Kean: The disappearing spoon: and other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements Content Type Journal Article Pages 77-77 DOI 10.1007/s10698-010-9101-x Authors Michael Laing, School of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4041 South Africa Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238 Journal Volume Volume 13 Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1.
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  27. Michael Laing (2007). Where to Put Hydrogen in a Periodic Table? Foundations of Chemistry 9 (2):127-137.
    A modification of the regular medium-form periodic table is presented in which certain elements are placed in more than one position. H is included at the top of both the alkali metals and the halogens; He is above Be and above Ne. The column of noble gases is duplicated as Groups O and 18. The elements of the second and third periods are duplicated above the transition metals. This arrangement displays more patterns and connections between the elements than are seen (...)
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  28. Michael Laing (2005). A Revised Periodic Table: With the Lanthanides Repositioned. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):203-233.
    The lanthanide elements from lanthanum to lutetium inclusive are incorporated into the body of the periodic table. They are subdivided into three sub-groups according to their important oxidation states: La to Sm, Eu to Tm, Yb and Lu, so that Eu and Yb fall directly below Ba; La, Gd, Lu form a column directly below Y; Ce and Tb fall in a vertical line between Zr and Hf. Pm falls below Tc; both are radioactive, and not naturally occurring. The elements (...)
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  29. Francis T. Marchese (2013). Periodicity, Visualization, and Design. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (1):31-55.
    This paper explores the development of the chemical table as a tool designed for chemical information visualization. It uses a historical context to investigate the purpose of chemical tables and charts, analyzing them from the perspective of theory of tables, cartography, and design. It suggests reasons why the two-dimensional periodic table remains the de facto standard for chemical information display.
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  30. E. G. Marks & J. A. Marks (2010). Newlands Revisited: A Display of the Periodicity of the Chemical Elements for Chemists. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):85-93.
    This is a periodic table explicitly for chemists rather than physicists. It is derived from Newlands’ columns. It solves many problems such as the positions of hydrogen, helium, beryllium, zinc and the lanthanoids but all within a succinct format.
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  31. Peter G. Nelson (2013). Periodicity in the Formulae of Carbonyls and the Electronic Basis of the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 15 (2):199-208.
    The basis of the Periodic Table is discussed. Electronic configuration recurs in only 21 out of the 32 groups. A better basis is derived by considering the highest classical valency (v) exhibited by an element and a new measure, the highest valency in carbonyl compounds (v*). This leads to a table based on the number of outer electrons possessed by an atom (N) and the number of electrons required for it to achieve an inert (noble) gas configuration (N*). Periodicity of (...)
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  32. Mansoor Niaz, María A. Rodríguez & Angmary Brito (2004). An Appraisal of Mendeleev's Contribution to the Development of the Periodic Table. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):271-282.
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  33. Octavio Novaro (2008). On the Rightful Place for He Within the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 10 (1):3-12.
    Many different arguments have been put forward in order to assign the best place for a given element within Mendeleev's Table: its spectroscopy, its chemical activity, the crystalline structure of its solid state, etc. We here propose another criterion; the nature of the few body corrections to the pairwise additive energy. This argument is used here to address a question often brought forward by Eric Scerri in Foundations of Chemistry, namely the rightful place of helium; either above the column of (...)
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  34. Octavio Novaro (2005). Activity of Closed D-Shells in Noble Metal Atoms. Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):241-268.
    The Periodic Table has the column of the noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) as one of its main pillars. Indeed the inert chemical nature of their closed shell structure is so striking that it is sometimes extended to all such structures. Is it true however that any closed shell, say a closed d-subshell will denote a lack of chemical activity? Take the noble metals for instance, so renowned for their catalytic capacity. Platinum has 10 electrons in (...)
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  35. V. N. Ostrovsky (2005). On Recent Discussion Concerning Quantum Justification of the Periodic Table of the Elements. Foundations of Chemistry 7 (3):235-239.
    The recent exchange on the quantum justification of the Periodic System of the Elements in this Journal between Scerri [Foundations of Chemistry 6: 93–116, 2004] and Friedrich [Foundations of Chemistry 6: 117–132, 2004] is supplemented by some methodological comments.
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  36. V. N. Ostrovsky (2001). What and How Physics Contributes to Understanding the Periodic Law. Foundations of Chemistry 3 (2):145-181.
    The current status of explanation worked out by Physics for the Periodic Law is considered from philosophical and methodological points of view. The principle gnosiological role of approximations and models in providing interpretation for complicated systems is emphasized. The achievements, deficiencies and perspectives of the existing quantum mechanical interpretation of the Periodic Table are discussed. The mainstream ab initio theory is based on analysis of selfconsistent one-electron effective potential. Alternative approaches employing symmetry considerations and applying group theory usually require some (...)
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  37. Gabor Pallo (2011). Early Impact of Quantum Physics on Chemistry: George Hevesy's Work on Rare Earth Elements and Michael Polanyi's Absorption Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (1):51-61.
    After Heitler and London published their pioneering work on the application of quantum mechanics to chemistry in 1927, it became an almost unquestioned dogma that chemistry would soon disappear as a discipline of its own rights. Reductionism felt victorious in the hope of analytically describing the chemical bond and the structure of molecules. The old quantum theory has already produced a widely applied model for the structure of atoms and the explanation of the periodic system. This paper will show two (...)
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  38. G. W. Rayner-Canham (2007). Eric R. Scerri, the Periodic Table: Its Story and its Significance. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 9 (2):215-218.
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  39. Geoff Rayner-Canham (2013). Periodic Patterns: The Group (N) and Group (N + 10) Linkage. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 15 (2):229-237.
    The early Periodic Tables displayed an 8-Group system. Though we now use an 18-Group array, the old versions were based on evidence of similarities between what we now label as Group (n) and the corresponding Group (n + 10). As part of a series on patterns in the Periodic Table, in this contribution, these similarities are explored for the first time in a systematic manner. Pourbaix (Eh–pH) diagrams have been found particularly useful in this context.
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  40. Geoff Rayner-Canham (2011). Isodiagonality in the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):121-129.
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  41. Geoff Rayner-Canham (2011). Relationships Among the Transition Elements. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):223-232.
    As part of a series of contributions on patterns in the periodic table, the relationships among the transition metals are examined here in a systematic manner. It is concluded that the traditional method of categorizing transition elements by group or by period is not as valid as by using combinations thereof. From chemical similarities, it is proposed that the transition metals be considered as the [V–Cr–Mn] triad; the [Fe–Co–Ni–Cu] tetrad; the [Ti–Zr–Hf–Nb–Ta] pentad; the [Mo–W–Tc–Re] tetrad; and the [Ru–Os–Rh–Ir–Pd–Pt–Au] heptad. Silver (...)
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  42. Geoff Rayner-Canham (2009). Isoelectronic Series: A Fundamental Periodic Property. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 11 (2):123-129.
    The usefulness of isoelectronic series (same number of total electrons and atoms and of valence electrons) across Periods is often overlooked. Here we show the ubiquitousness of isoelectronic sets by means of matrices, arrays, and sequential series. Some of these series have not previously been identified. In addition, we recommend the use of the term valence-isoelectronic for species which differ in the number of core electrons and pseudo-isoelectronic for matching (n) and (n + 10) species.
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  43. Geoff Rayner-Canham & Megan Oldford (2007). The Chemical 'Knight's Move' Relationship: What is its Significance? [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 9 (2):119-125.
    Similarities in properties among pairs of metallic elements and their compounds in the lower-right quadrant of the Periodic Table have been named the ‘Knight’s Move’ relationship. Here, we have undertaken a systematic study of the only two ‘double-pairs’ of ‘Knight’s Move’ elements within this region: copper-indium/indium-bismuth and zinc-tin/tin-polonium, focussing on: metal melting points; formulas and properties of compounds; and melting points of halides and chalcogenides. On the basis of these comparisons, we conclude that the systematic evidence for ‘Knight’s Move’ relationships (...)
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  44. Guillermo Restrepo & Leonardo Pachón (2007). Mathematical Aspects of the Periodic Law. Foundations of Chemistry 9 (2):189-214.
    We review different studies of the Periodic Law and the set of chemical elements from a mathematical point of view. This discussion covers the first attempts made in the 19th century up to the present day. Mathematics employed to study the periodic system includes number theory, information theory, order theory, set theory and topology. Each theory used shows that it is possible to provide the Periodic Law with a mathematical structure. We also show that it is possible to study the (...)
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  45. Lawrence J. Sacks (2006). Concerning the Position of Hydrogen in the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 8 (1):31-35.
    The placement of hydrogen in the periodic table has unique implications for fundamental questions of chemical behavior. Recent arguments in favor of placing hydrogen either separately at the top of the table or as a member of the carbon family are shown to have serious defects. A Coulombic model, in which all compounds of hydrogen are treated as hydrides, places hydrogen exclusively as the first member of the halogen family and forms the basis for reconsideration of fundamental concepts in bonding (...)
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  46. Eric Scerri (2012). What is an Element? What is the Periodic Table? And What Does Quantum Mechanics Contribute to the Question? Foundations of Chemistry 14 (1):69-81.
    This article considers two important traditions concerning the chemical elements. The first is the meaning of the term “element” including the distinctions between element as basic substance, as simple substance and as combined simple substance. In addition to briefly tracing the historical development of these distinctions, I make comments on the recent attempts to clarify the fundamental notion of element as basic substance for which I believe the term “element” is best reserved. This discussion has focused on the writings of (...)
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  47. Eric Scerri (2010). Explaining the Periodic Table, and the Role of Chemical Triads. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (1):69-83.
    Some recent work in mathematical chemistry is discussed. It is claimed that quantum mechanics does not provide a conclusive means of classifying certain elements like hydrogen and helium into their appropriate groups. An alternative approach using atomic number triads is proposed and the validity of this approach is defended in the light of some predictions made via an information theoretic approach that suggests a connection between nuclear structure and electronic structure of atoms.
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  48. Eric Scerri, What If the Periodic Table Starts and Ends with Triads?
    The purpose of this paper is to propose a new design for the presentation of the periodic system of the elements. It is a system that highlights the fundamental importance of elements as basic substances rather than elements as simple substances. Furthermore the fundamental nature of atomic number triads of elements is put to use in obtaining a new perfect triad by relocating hydrogen among the halogens to give the triad H, F, Cl. An unexpected regularity in the period lengths (...)
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  49. Eric R. Scerri (2012). A Critique of Weisberg's View on the Periodic Table and Some Speculations on the Nature of Classifications. Foundations of Chemistry 14 (3):275-284.
    This article carefully analyzes a recent paper by Weisberg in which it is claimed that when Mendeleev discovered the periodic table he was not working as a modeler but instead as a theorist. I argue that Weisberg is mistaken in several respects and that the periodic table should be regarded as a classification, not as a theory. In the second part of the article an attempt is made to elevate the status of classifications by suggesting that they provide a form (...)
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  50. Eric R. Scerri (2006). Commentary on Allen & Kinght's Response to the Löwdin chAllenge. Foundations of Chemistry 8 (3):285-292.
    This commentary provides a critical examination of a recent article by Allen and Knight in which the authors claim to provide the long-sought explanation for the Madelung, or n + ℓ, n rule for the order of orbital filling in many-electron atoms. It is concluded that the explanation is inadequate for several reasons.
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