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  1. A. H. B. Allen (1952). Other Minds. Mind 61 (243):328-348.
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  2. Bruce Aune (1986). Other Minds After Twenty Years. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):559-574.
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  3. Ralph Barton Perry (1909). The Hiddenness of the Mind. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (2):29-36.
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  4. Andrew Bowman (1953). Knowledge of Other Minds. Journal of Philosophy 50 (September):328-32.
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  5. Bill Brewer (2002). Emotion and Other Minds. In Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
    What is the relation between emotional experience and its behavioural expression? As very preliminary clarification, I mean by ‘emotional experience’ such things as the subjective feeling of being afraid of something, or of being angry at someone. On the side of behavioural expression, I focus on such things as cowering in fear, or shaking a fist or thumping the table in anger. Very crudely, this is behaviour intermediate between the bodily changes which just happen in emotional arousal, such as sweating (...)
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  6. Bill Brewer (2002). Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
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  7. R. Buck (1962). Non-Other Minds. In Ronald J. Butler (ed.), Analytic Philosophy. Barnes and Noble.
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  8. Thomas O. Buford (1970). Essays on Other Minds. University of Illinois Press.
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  9. Tyler Burge (1998). Computer Proof, A Priori Knowledge, and Other Minds. Philosophical Perspectives 12 (S12):1-37.
  10. Alex Burri & Stephan Furrer (1994). Truth and Knowledge of Other Minds. In European Review of Philosophy, Volume 1: Philosophy of Mind. Stanford: CSLI Publications.
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  11. Antoine de La Garanderie (2006). Le Sens de l'Autre de Lévinas à Teilhard de Chardin. Aubin.
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  12. Ilham Dilman (1975). Matter And Mind: Two Essays In Epistemology. Macmillan.
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  13. Alan Donagan (1966). Other Minds and Other Periods. Journal of Philosophy 63 (October):577-579.
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  14. Monika Dullstein (forthcoming). Einfühlung und Empathie. In T. Breyer (ed.), Grenzen der Empathie. Philosophische, psychologische und anthropologische Perspektiven. Wilhelm Fink.
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  15. Monika Dullstein (2013). Direct Perception and Simulation: Stein's Account of Empathy. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (2):333-350.
    The notion of empathy has been explicated in different ways in the current debate on how to understand others. Whereas defenders of simulation-based approaches claim that empathy involves some kind of isomorphism between the empathizer’s and the target’s mental state, defenders of the phenomenological account vehemently deny this and claim that empathy allows us to directly perceive someone else’s mental states. Although these views are typically presented as being opposed, I argue that at least one version of a simulation-based approach—the (...)
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  16. Monika Dullstein (2012). The Second Person in the Theory of Mind Debate. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (2):231-248.
    It has become increasingly common to talk about the second person in the theory of mind debate. While theory theory and simulation theory are described as third person and first person accounts respectively, a second person account suggests itself as a viable, though wrongfully neglected third option. In this paper I argue that this way of framing the debate is misleading. Although defenders of second person accounts make use of the vocabulary of the theory of mind debate, they understand some (...)
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  17. Herbert Feigl (1958). II. Other Minds and the Egocentric Predicament. Journal of Philosophy 55 (23):978-987.
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  18. Lloyd Fields (1972). Other People's Experiences. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (January):29-43.
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  19. Kenneth T. Gallagher (1964). Intersubjective Knowledge. In The Philosophy of Knowledge.
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  20. Kenneth T. Gallagher (1964). The Philosophy of Knowledge. New York, Sheed & Ward.
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  21. Anil Gomes (forthcoming). Skepticism About Other Minds. In Diego Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism: From Antiquity to the Present. Bloomsbury.
    In this paper I distinguish two ways of raising a sceptical problem of others' minds: via a problem concerning the possibility of error or via a problem concerning sources of knowledge. I give some reason to think that the second problem raises a more interesting problem in accounting for our knowledge of others’ minds and consider proposed solutions to the problem.
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  22. Russell B. Goodman (1985). Cavell and the Problem of Other Minds. Philosophical Topics 13 (2):43-52.
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  23. Joshua C. Gregory (1922). Some Tendencies of Opinion on Our Knowledge of Other Minds. Philosophical Review 31 (2):148-163.
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  24. Jane Heal (1997). Understanding Other Minds From Inside. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Contemporary Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.
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  25. Douglas Henslee (1982). Methods and Other Minds. Southwest Philosophical Studies 8 (October):1-8.
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  26. Christopher S. Hill (1985). On Getting to Know Others. Philosophical Topics 13 (2):257-266.
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  27. Robert R. Hoffman (1960). The Problem of Other Minds - Genuine or Pseudo? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (June):503-512.
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  28. Jim Hopkins (1974). Wittgenstein and Physicalism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 75:121 - 146.
    Wittgenstein's private language argument refutes the Cartesian conception of the mind and thereby clears the way for a physicalistic understanding of phenomenology.
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  29. Daniel D. Hutto (2007). The Narrative Practice Hypothesis: Origins and Applications of Folk Psychology. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (60):43-68.
    This paper promotes the view that our childhood engagement with narratives of a certain kind is the basis of sophisticated folk psychological abilities —i.e. it is through such socially scaffolded means that folk psychological skills are normally acquired and fostered. Undeniably, we often use our folk psychological apparatus in speculating about why another may have acted on a particular occasion, but this is at best a peripheral and parasitic use. Our primary understanding and skill in folk psychology derives from and (...)
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  30. Daniel D. Hutto (2002). The World is Not Enough: Shared Emotions and Other Minds. In Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
    This chapter argues that the conceptual problem of other minds cannot be properly addressed as long as we subscribe to an individualistic model of how we stand in relation to our own experiences and the behaviour of others. For it is commitment to this picture that sponsors the strong first/third person divide that lies at the heart of the two false accounts of experiential concept learning sketched above. This is the true source of the problem. To deal successfully with it (...)
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  31. Daniel D. Hutto (2002). Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
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  32. William H. Hyde (1979). Empirical Realism and Other Minds. Philosophical Investigations 2 (2):13-21.
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  33. Alec Hyslop, Other Minds. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Alec Hyslop defends a (modified) version of the traditional analogical inference to other minds and rejects alternatives, but only after subjecting each of...
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  34. Alec Hyslop (1979). A Multiple Case Inference and Other Minds. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (December):330-36.
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  35. Alec Hyslop (1970). The Identity Theory and Other Minds. Philosophical Forum 2:152-153.
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  36. Alec Hyslop (1969). The Plight of the Inner Process. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 47 (December):385-395.
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  37. Pierre Jacob (2005). First-Person and Third-Person Mindreading. In P. Gampieri-Deutsch (ed.), Psychoanalysis as an Empirical, Interdisciplinary Science. Austrian Academy of Sciences.
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  38. J. R. Jones (1950). Our Knowledge of Other Persons. Philosophy 25 (April):134-148.
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  39. J. Jorgensen (1949). Remarks Concerning the Concept of Mind and the Problem of Other People's Minds. Theoria 15 (1‐3):116-127.
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  40. Nicholas Karalis (1956). Knowledge of Other Minds. Review of Metaphysics 9 (June):565-568.
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  41. Hamida Khanom (1959). Knowledge of Other Minds. Pakistan Philosophical Congress 6:122-127.
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  42. J. Theodore Klein (1977). Knowledge of Other Minds. Midwestern Journal of Philosophy 5:31-37.
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  43. Y. H. Krikorian (1962). The Publicity of Mind. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (March):317-325.
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  44. Michael E. Levin (1984). Why We Believe in Other Minds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (March):343-59.
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  45. James E. Lindsay (1917). The Knowledge of Other Minds. Philosophical Review 26 (5):545-547.
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  46. Don Locke (1968). Myself and Others: A Study in Our Knowledge of Minds. Oxford University Press.
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  47. Douglas C. Long (1979). Agents, Mechanisms, and Other Minds. In Donald F. Gustafson & Bangs L. Tapscott (eds.), Body, Mind And Method. Dordrecht: Reidel. 129--148.
    One of the goals of physiologists who study the detailed physical, chemical,and neurological mechanisms operating within the human body is to understand the intricate causal processes which underlie human abilities and activities. It is doubtless premature to predict that they will eventually be able to explain the behaviour of a particular human being as we might now explain the behaviour of a pendulum clock or even the invisible changes occurring within the hardware of a modern electronic computer. Nonetheless, it seems (...)
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  48. Douglas C. Long (1979). Body, Mind And Method. Dordrecht: Reidel.
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  49. Thomas A. Long (1965). Strawson and the Pains of Others. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (May):73-77.
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  50. D. L. C. Maclachlan (1993). Strawson and the Argument for Other Minds. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:149-157.
    The classical argument for the existence of other minds begins by ascribing states of consciousness to oneself, and argues to the existence of other conscious beings on the basis of an analogy in bodily constitution and behavior. P. F. Strawson attacks the foundation of this argument. “One can ascribe states of consciousness to oneself only if one can ascribe them to others. One can ascribe them to others only if one can identify other subjects of experience.” My thesis is that (...)
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