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  1. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Wickedness Redux. Philo 14 (2):137-160.
    Some philosophers have argued that the concepts of evil and wickedness cannot be well grasped by those inclined to a naturalist bent, perhaps because evil is so intimately tied to religious discourse or because it is ultimately not possible to understand evil, period. By contrast, I argue that evil—or, at least, what it is to be an evil person—can be understood by naturalist philosophers, and I articulate an independently plausible account of evil character.
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  2. James Cain (2004). Free Will and the Problem of Evil. Religious Studies 40 (4):437-456.
    According to the free-will defence, the exercise of free will by creatures is of such value that God is willing to allow the existence of evil which comes from the misuse of free will. A well-known objection holds that the exercise of free will is compatible with determinism and thus, if God exists, God could have predetermined exactly how the will would be exercised; God could even have predetermined that free will would be exercised sinlessly. Thus, it is held, the (...)
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  3. Philippe Gagnon (2012). The Problem of Trans-Humanism in the Light of Philosophy and Theology. In James B. Stump & Alan G. Padgett (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity, pp. 393-405. Blackwell. 393-405.
    Transhumanism is a means of advocating a re-engineering of conditions that surround human existence at both ends. The problem set before us in this chapter is to inquire into what determined its appearance, in particular in the humanism it seeks to overcome. We look at the spirit of overcoming itself, and the impatience with the Self, in order to try to understand why it seeks a saving power in technology. We then consider how the evolutionary account of the production of (...)
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  4. Ada S. Jaarsma (2010). Habermas' Kierkegaard and the Nature of the Secular. Constellations 17 (2):271-292.
  5. Ada S. Jaarsma (2003). Irigaray's to Be Two: The Problem of Evil and the Plasticity of Incarnation. Hypatia 18 (1):44 - 62.
    Increasingly, feminist theorists, such as Alison Martin and Ellen T. Armour, are attending to the numerous religious allusions within texts by Luce Irigaray. Engaging with this scholarship, this paper focuses on the problematic of evil that is elaborated within Irigarayan texts. Mobilizing the work of Catherine Malabou, the paper argues that Malabou's methodology of reading, which she identifies as "plastic," illuminates the logic at work within Irigaray's deployment of sacred stories.
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  6. John Kekes (2005). The Roots of Evil. Cornell University Press.
    Uses case studies of evil, the most serious of our moral Problems, to explain why people act with cruelty, greed, prejudice and fanatacism.
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  7. Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction to Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil, Part II. Hypatia 18 (2):152-154.
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  8. Robin May Schott (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on "Feminist Philosophy and the Problem of Evil". Hypatia 18 (1):1-9.
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  9. Paul Tidman (1993). The Epistemology of Evil Possibilities. Faith and Philosophy 10 (2):181-197.
    In this paper I defend the Anselmian conception of God as a necessary being who is necessarily omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly good against arguments that attempt to show that we have good reason to think there are evil possible worlds in which either God does not exist or in which He lacks at least one of these attributes. I argue that the critics of Anselmianism have failed to provide any compelling reason to think such worlds are possible. The best the (...)
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