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Siblings:History/traditions: The Self, Misc
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  1. E. J. A. (1966). Self-Knowledge and Self-Identity. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):601-601.
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  2. E. M. Adams (1993). Rationality and Morality. Review of Metaphysics 46 (4):683 - 697.
    The purpose of the article is to challenge widely accepted views of the relationship among rationality, morality, and prudence. It contends that we cannot understand either the rational or the moral enterprise without a correct philosophical view of the human self, and that such a view of the self is impossible without taking account of the rational and the moral enterprises themselves. The paper concludes that the moral point of view is anchored in the nature of selfhood so that one (...)
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  3. Frederick Adams (1992). Machine Persons. The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):47-55.
  4. Gwen Adshead (2010). Looking Backward and Forward. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):251-253.
    Philosophy says that life must be understood backwards. But . . . it must be lived forward. . , , It is more and more evident that life can never be really understood in Time. It was a pleasure to read Jason Thompson’s serious and thought-provoking piece, and I am grateful to the editors for giving me a chance to comment. The idea that the self is revealed in narrative is a popular one among different schools of psychotherapy, both in (...)
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  5. Joseph Jerome Allen (1973). Self: A Metaphysical Theory. Dissertation, Tulane University
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  6. Se-Gweon An (1990). Intentionality, Time, and Self-Identity: Husserl's Theory of Time and the Problem of Personal Identity. Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
    In this dissertation I raise three questions: What is Husserl's theory of time?; Can we develop a particular thesis of self-identity and, if so, what would it look like?; How does the thesis work in relation to the problems that are to be solved? ;In chapter II, I give an exposition of Husserl's view on time with the purpose of establishing a framework that will play a decisive role in the formation of a thesis of self-identity. Husserl defines time as (...)
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  7. Chrisoula Andreou (2013). Agency and Awareness. Ratio 26 (2):117-133.
    I focus on the idea that if, as a result of lacking any conscious goal related to X-ing and any conscious anticipation or awareness of X-ing, one could sincerely reply to the question ‘Why are you X-ing?’ with ‘I didn't realize I was doing that,’ then one's X-ing is not intentional. My interest is in the idea interpreted as philosophically substantial (rather than merely stipulative) and as linked to the familiar view that there is a major difference, relative to the (...)
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  8. Chrisoula Andreou (2012). Self-Defeating Self-Governance. Philosophical Issues 22 (1):20-34.
  9. Yoko Arisaka (2001). The Ontological Co-Emergence Of'self and Other'in Japanese Philosophy. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):5-7.
    The coupling of 'self and other' as well as the issues regarding intersubjectivity have been central topics in modern Japanese philosophy. The dominant views are critical of the Cartesian formulation , but the Japanese philosophers drew their conclusions also based on their own insights into Japanese culture and language. In this paper I would like to explore this theme in two of the leading modern Japanese philosophers - Kitaro Nishida and Tetsuro Watsuji . I do not make a causal claim (...)
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  10. Stephen T. Asma (2012). Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19.
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  11. Cassandra Aspinall (2004). The Scaffolding of the Self. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):169-172.
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  12. Bruce Aune (1983). The Identity of the Self. Review of Metaphysics 36 (3):724-726.
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  13. LR Baker, The Emergent Self.
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  14. Lynne Rudder Baker (2002). The Emergent Self. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):734-736.
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  15. John Barresi, On Seeing Our Selves and Others as Persons.
    Human beings may be the only organisms capable of thinking of self and other in equivalent ways – as selves and persons. Most organisms think about their own activities differently than they do the activities of others. A few large-brained organisms like chimps and dolphins sometimes think of the activities of self and other in the same way. But, only humans think quite generally in this manner. In this paper I give a description of our commonsense notions of self and (...)
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  16. Simon Beck (2006). Fiction and Fictions: On Ricoeur on the Route to the Self. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):329-335.
    In reaching his narrative view of the self in Oneself as Another, Paul Ricoeur argues that, while literature offers revealing insights into the nature of the self, the sort of fictions involving brain transplants, fission, and so on, that philosophers often take seriously do not (and cannot). My paper is a response to Ricoeur's charge, contending that the arguments Ricoeur rejects are not flawed in the way he suggests, and that his own arguments are sometimes guilty of the very charges (...)
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  17. Kathy Behrendt (2014). Whole Lives and Good Deaths. Metaphilosophy 45 (3):331-347.
    This article discusses two views associated with narrative conceptions of the self. The first view asserts that our whole life is reasonably regarded as a single unit of meaning. A prominent strand of the philosophical narrative account of the self is the representative of this view. The second view—which has currency beyond the confines of the philosophical narrative account—is that the meaning of a life story is dependent on what happens at the end of it. The article argues that the (...)
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  18. Kathy Behrendt (2013). Illness as Narrative. [REVIEW] Medical Humanities 39 (1):65-66.
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  19. Kathy Behrendt (2007). Reasons to Be Fearful: Strawson, Death and Narrative. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (60):133-.
    I compare and assess two significant and opposing approaches to the self with respect to what they have to say about death: the anti-narrativist, as articulated by Galen Strawson, and the narrativist, as pieced together from a variety of accounts. Neither party fares particularly well on the matter of death. Both are unable to point towards a view of death that is clearly consistent with their views on the self. In the narrativist’s case this inconsistency is perhaps not as explicit (...)
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  20. Jason M. Bell (1999). The World and Its Selves: Royce and the Philosophy of Nature. The Personalist Forum 15 (1):167-184.
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  21. James O. Bennett (1999). Selves and Personal Existence in the Existentialist Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):135-156.
    It is argued that while existentialists typically reject the notion of a "self-thing," they proceed to formulate process views of personal existence. The views of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Jaspers, Heidegger, Ortega y Gasset, Sartre, Marcel, and Merleau-Ponty are briefly reviewed. In the course of discussion, the relation of the phenomenological existentialists to the others is also considered. (It is argued that the latter group is no less philosophical or existential than the others.) I also touch on the relation of existentialism to (...)
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  22. Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). I Am a Lot of Things: A Pluralistic Account of the Self. Metaphysica, An International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics.
    When I say that I am a lot of things, I mean it literally and metaphysically speaking. The Self, or so I shall argue, is a plurality (notwithstanding the fact that ordinary language takes "the Self" to be a singular term – but, after all, language is only language). It is not a substance or a substratum, and it is not a collection or a bundle. The view I wish to advocate for is a kind of reductionism, in line with (...)
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  23. Jose Luis Bermudez (1995). Aspects of the Self: John Campbell's Past, Space, and Self. Inquiry 38 (4):1-15.
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  24. Daniele Bertini (2007). Fondazione del problema del pensare. Segni E Comprensione 21 (62):124-140.
    My main claim is that, in order to account for the nature of human mind, philosophy of mind should embody topics usually treated by disciplines as ethics or applied philosophy so as to enrich the pure notion of cognitive experience to the extent of treating the whole of human experience. I begin with considering the Cartesian approach to the "cogito". I argue for the claim that cartesian-like dualists (Descartes and Locke, Kant and Husserl) fail in treating the opposition of internalism (...)
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  25. Susan Blackmore (1994). Demolishing the Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 1 (2):280-282.
    [opening paragraph]: Do you believe, deep down, that you exist? Do you feel as though `you' make the decisions and run `your' life? Above all do you think that `you' are conscious? If so, according to Guy Claxton's latest book, you have got it all wrong.
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  26. Stephan Blatti (2008). Review: Raymond Martin and John Barresi: The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):191-195.
    This is a review of Raymond Martin and John Barresi's The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity (Columbia University Press, 2006).
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  27. Ruth Boeker (2013). Locke on Personal Identity: Consciousness and Concernment. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):803-6.
  28. W. R. Carter (1988). Our Bodies, Our Selves. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (September):308-319.
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  29. Luca Castagnoli (2009). Self and Personal Identity (R.) Sorabji Self: Ancient and Modern Insights About Individuality, Life, and Death. Pp. Xii + 400. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006. Cased, £25. ISBN: 0-19-926639-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):69-.
  30. Christopher Cherry (1984). Self, Near-Death and Death. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (1):3 - 11.
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  31. Samuel Clark (2011). Love, Poetry, and the Good Life: Mill's Autobiography and Perfectionist Ethics. Inquiry 53 (6):565-578.
    I argue for a perfectionist reading of Mill’s account of the good life, by using the failures of development recorded in his Autobiography as a way to understand his official account of happiness in Utilitarianism. This work offers both a new perspective on Mill’s thought, and a distinctive account of the role of aesthetic and emotional capacities in the most choiceworthy human life. I consider the philosophical purposes of autobiography, Mill’s disagreements with Bentham, and the nature of competent judges and (...)
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  32. David S. Clarke (1972). A Defence of the No-Ownership Theory. Mind 81 (January):97-101.
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  33. Stefano Cossara (2012). Cognitive Science, Moral Responsibility And The Self. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communicaton 7 (1):1-18.
    In their “Free Will and the Bounds of the Self”, Knobe and Nichols try to get at the root of the discomfort that people feel when confronted with the picture of the mind that characterizes contemporary cognitive science in order to establish whether such discomfort is warranted or not. Their conclusion is that people’s puzzlement cannot be dismissed as a product of confusion, for it stems from some fundamental aspects of their conception of the self. In this paper I suggest, (...)
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  34. Barry Dainton (2012). On Singularities and Simulations. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (1):42.
  35. Barry Dainton (2012). Self-Hood and the Flow of Experience. Grazer Philosophische Studien 84 (1):161-200.
    Analytic philosophy in the 20 th century was largely hostile territory to the self as traditionally conceived, and this tradition has been continued in two recent works: Mark Johnston’s Surviving Death , and Galen Strawson’s Selves . I have argued previously that it is perfectly possible to combine a naturalistic worldview with a conception of the self as a subject of experience , a thing whose only essential attribute is a capacity for unifi ed and continuous experience. I argue here (...)
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  36. Ulrich Diehl (1997). The Selfhood of the Human Person. [REVIEW] The Personalist Forum 13 (2):332-338.
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  37. Michael D. Doan (2010). The Self and Its Emotions. [REVIEW] Dialogue 49 (4):654-656.
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  38. Fred Downing (1992). Refusing to Draw the Circle Around 'the Self': The Quest for Community in the Work of Basehart and Berenson. The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):187-189.
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  39. Wilfried Ver Eecke & Jennifer Grady (1999). The Subjective Experience of the Person with Schizophrenia: Louis Sass’s Contribution. The Personalist Forum 15 (2):320-333.
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  40. Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 2: The Integration of Desire. Lulu.
    An argument that there is a common pattern in conflict between desires and the dialectical integration of those conflicts, at both individual and socio-political levels. Philosophical, psychological, poltical and Buddhist approaches to integration are brought together here to show how the integration of desire contributes to moral objectivity.
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  41. Kathinka Evers (2001). The Importance of Being a Self. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):65-83.
    A traditional belief is that there is but one self to a body, and that each of us has a single biography and personality. Varieties of this monistic view have dominated most of mankind’s intellectual history in philosophy, science, religion, and psychology, as well as legal and social theory. It has been challenged by appeal to those people whom psychiatry labels “multiple,” or “dissociated” personalities who, some claim, are “multiple selves.” This may be adequate if the self is explained by (...)
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  42. Lloyd P. Gerson (1992). The Discovery of the Self in Antiquity. The Personalist Forum 8 (1):249-257.
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  43. Bennett Gilbert, Certeau: The Question of the Subject.
    A reading of two essays by Certeau against spatialized critical theory and in support of a critical rhetorical approach to dialectic. (Draft.). (2010).
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  44. James Giles (1997). No Self to Be Found: The Search for Personal Identity. University Press of America.
    This book is a exploration of the notion of personal identity. Here it is shown how the various attempts to give an account of personal identity are all based on false assumptions and so inevitably run aground. One of the first Western thinkers to realize this was David Hume, the 18th century empiricist philosopher who argued that self was a fiction. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive point (...)
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  45. Grant Gillett (2009). The Subjective Brain, Identity, and Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):5-13.
    The human brain is subjective and reflects the life of a being-in-the-world-with-others whose identity reflects that complex engaged reality. Human subjectivity is shaped and in-formed (formed by inner processes) that are adapted to the human life-world and embody meaning and the relatedness of a human being. Questions of identity relate to this complex and dynamic reality to reflect the fact that biology, human ecology, culture, and one's historic-political situation are inscribed in one's neural network and have configured its architecture so (...)
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  46. Peter Goldie (2012). The Mess Inside. Oxford University Press.
    Peter Goldie explores the ways in which we think about our lives--our past, present, and future--in narrative terms. The notion of narrative is highly topical, and highly contentious, in a wide range of fields including philosophy, psychology and psychoanalysis, historical studies, and literature. The Mess Inside engages with all of these areas of discourse, and steers a path between the sceptics who are dismissive of the idea of narrative as having any worthwhile use at all, and those who argue that (...)
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  47. Mariusz Grygianiec (2013). On E.J. Lowe's Argument for Brobdingnagian Atomism. Filozofia Nauki 1.
    In a number of his essays E. J. Lowe has presented an interesting argument for the ontological simplicity of the self. This argument became the subject of Eric T. Ol-son’s polemic reaction, who tried — unsuccesfully — to discover a formal mistake in the argument. Eventually, the modified and improved version of Lowe’s reasoning came out in his paper Identity, Composition, and the Simplicity of the Self. It seemed that the argument for the ontological simplicity of the self has resisted (...)
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  48. Walter Guliek (1993). An Unlikely Synthesis: What Kant Can Contribute to a Polanyian Theory of Selfhood. The Personalist Forum 9 (2):81-107.
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  49. William Hasker (1999). The Emergent Self. Cornell University Press.
    In The Emergent Self, William Hasker joins one of the most heated debates in contemporary analytic philosophy, that over the nature of mind.
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  50. Steven Heine (2004). Beyond Personal Identity: Dogen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self (Review). Philosophy East and West 54 (4):569-571.
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