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Self-Consciousness* (877 | 76)
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See also:History/traditions: The Self
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  1. George Adams (2004). Locating the Self In Kierkegaard and Zen. Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):370-380.
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  2. Miri Albahari (2006). Analytical Buddhism: The Two-Tiered Illusion of Self. Palgrave Macmillan.
    We spend our lives protecting an elusive self - but does the self actually exist? Drawing on literature from Western philosophy, neuroscience and Buddhism (interpreted), the author argues that there is no self. The self - as unified owner and thinker of thoughts - is an illusion created by two tiers. A tier of naturally unified consciousness (notably absent in standard bundle-theory accounts) merges with a tier of desire-driven thoughts and emotions to yield the impression of a self. So while (...)
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  3. S. Alexander (1910). Self as Subject and as Person. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 11:1 - 28.
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  4. Wilfried Allaerts (1997). The Self and its Biological Function: Contrasts Between Popper and Sartre. Logique Et Analyse 40:189-214.
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  5. Ana Álvarez Garrido (2010). Identidad Personal y Donación: La Configuración Del Yo En la Acción Dramática. Eutelequia Editorial.
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  6. Joel Anderson (1995). The Persistence of Authenticity. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 21 (1).
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  7. W. Anderson (1928). Self. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):81 – 92.
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  8. J. B. Annand (ed.) (1977). Education for Self-Discovery. Hodder and Stoughton.
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  9. Bruce Aune (1994). Speaking of Selves. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):279-93.
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  10. M. W. Austin (forthcoming). The Second-Person Perspective in Aquinas's Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly.
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  11. Elif Ayiter (2010). Alpha. Tribe. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (7-8):7-8.
    This paper takes a first-hand look at the creation of multiple identities through multiple avatars by a single user in Second Life®. This phenomenon, together with its non-virtual predecessors such as the literary nom de plume, challenges the validity of the notion of the undivided 'self', particularly in the context of creative practices. 'alpha.tribe' is an experimental group of avatars who have founded a virtual fashion business in Second Life®. The creative output of this enterprise provides the visual context through (...)
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  12. H. B. (1971). Hegel in Berichten Seiner Zeitgenossen. Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):762-763.
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  13. L. K. B. (1958). On Selfhood and Godhood. Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):512-512.
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  14. P. D. B. (1981). Eclipse of the Self. Review of Metaphysics 35 (1):179-182.
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  15. H. E. Baber (1983). The Lifetime Language. Philosophical Studies 43 (1):139 - 146.
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  16. Lynne Rudder Baker (2013). L7 The First-Person Perspective and its Relation to Natural Science. In Matthew C. Haug (ed.), Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory? Routledge.
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  17. Lynne Rudder Baker (2003). Third Person Understanding. In A. J. Sanford & P. N. Johnson-Laird (eds.), The Nature and Limits of Human Understanding. T & T Clark.
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  18. Richard J. Baron, The Self is Unreal.
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  19. Samuel Barondes (2009). After Locke : Darwin, Freud, and Psychiatric Assessment. In Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.), Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  20. John Barresi, The Rise and Fall of the Conscious Self: A History of Western Concepts of Self and Personal Identity.
    I will trace the history of western conceptions of soul and self from the ancient Greeks to the present. The story line that I will present is based mainly on material covered in two books by Ray Martin and myself: _The Naturalization of the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the_.
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  21. Anthony Baxter (1997). Can One Be Cognitively Conscious of God? Heythrop Journal 38 (1):15–34.
    How do humans ‘register’ God: attain knowledge or revelation of God? Analysis is familiar in terms of explanatory hypothesis, necessity, authority and commitment. However individuals speak also of ‘experience’ or ‘consciousness’ of God/Christ/grace – received widely, not just by an esoteric few. But may we properly hold that people can be cognitively aware of God?Undoubtedly such speech has problematic aspects. Not only do psychosis, self‐deception, gullibility recur. Commentators are liable to enlist what may be termed the A‐conceptual Lucidity picture, which (...)
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  22. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
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  23. Jocelyn Benoist (2012). First Person is Not Just a Perspective: Thought, Reality and the Limits of Interpretation. In Miguens & Preyer (eds.), Consciousness and Subjectivity. Ontos Verlag. 231--244.
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  24. David Berman (2001). Book Review. Naturalization of the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the Eighteenth Century Raymond Martin John Barresi. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):508-512.
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  25. José Luis Bermúdez (1997). Reduction and the Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (4-5):458-466.
    Galen Strawson's keynote paper offers us one way of modelling the self, one that starts from the phenomenology of the sense of self and derives from that metaphysical conclusions about the nature of the self. Strawson is surely correct to hold that phenomenological considerations cannot be ignored in thinking about the metaphysics of the self. I am not as convinced as he is, however, that phenomenology is the royal road to metaphysics. What I want to sketch out in this short (...)
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  26. Susan David Bernstein (1992). Confessing Feminist Theory: What's "I" Got to Do with It? Hypatia 7 (2):120 - 147.
    Confessional modes of self-representation have become crucial in feminist epistemologies that broaden and contextualize the location and production of knowledge. In some versions of confessional feminism, the insertion of "I" is reflective, the product of an uncomplicated notion of experience that shuttles into academic discourse a personal truth. In contrast to reflective intrusions of the first person, reflexive confessing is primarily a questioning mode that imposes self-vigilance on the process of self positioning.
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  27. Peter A. Bertocci (1978). The Essence of a Person. The Monist 61 (January):28-41.
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  28. Henk Bij de Weg, Explaining Consciousness and the Duality of Method.
    In consciousness studies, the first-person perspective, seen as a way to approach consciousness, is often seen as nothing but a variant of the third-person perspective. One of the most important advocates of this view is Dennett. However, as I show in critical interaction with Dennett’s view, the first-person perspective and the third-person perspective are different ways of asking questions about themes. What these questions are is determined by the purposes that we have when we ask them. Since our purposes are (...)
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  29. David M. Blass (2009). Case Studies. In Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.), Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience. Johns Hopkins University Press.
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  30. Stephan Blatti (2008). The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity (Review). [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):191-95.
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  31. James Bohman (2000). The Importance of the Second Person: Interpretation, Practical Knowledge, and Normative Attitudes. In K. R. Stueber & H. H. Kogaler (eds.), Empathy and Agency: The Problem of Understanding in the Human Sciences. Boulder: Westview Press. 222--224.
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  32. Frances Bottenberg (2012). The Self and Its Emotions. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):480-484.
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  33. Cordula Brand (2010). Personale Identität Oder Menschliche Persistenz?: Ein Naturalistisches Kriterium. Mentis.
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  34. Susan T. Brison (1993). Surviving Sexual Violence: A Philosophical Perspective. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):5-22.
  35. Andrew Brook & Don Ross (eds.) (2002). Daniel Dennett. Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary Philosophy in Focus will offer a series of introductory volumes to many of the dominant philosophical thinkers of the current age. Each volume will consist of newly commissioned essays that will cover all the major contributions of a preeminent philosopher in a systematic and accessible manner. Author of such groundbreaking and influential books as Consciousness Explained and Darwin's Dangerous Idea, Daniel C. Dennett has reached a huge general and professional audience that extends way beyond the confines of academic philosophy. (...)
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  36. S. Brown (2000). Tip-of-the-Tongue Phenomena: An Introductory Phenomenological Analysis. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):516-537.
    The issue of meaningful yet unexpressed background-to language and to our experiences of the body-is one whose exploration is still in its infancy. There are various aspects of ''invisible,'' implicit, or background experiences which have been investigated from the viewpoints of phenomenology, cognitive psychology, and linguistics. I will argue that James's concept of the phenomenon of fringes, as explicated by Gurwitsch, provides a structural framework from which to investigate and better understand ideas and concepts that are indeterminate, particularly those experienced (...)
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  37. Anthony L. Brueckner (1986). Humean Fictions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (4):655-664.
    In "Of Personal Identity,", Hume attempts to explain how one arrives at the fiction of a substantial self which retains its numerical identity through time. In "Of Scepticism with Regard to the Senses," Hume offers a similar explanation of the origin of another fiction - that of objects which enjoy a continued and distinct existence. In this paper, I will argue that his pair of parallel explanations does not jointly account for the pair of fictions to be explained.
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  38. Tyler Burge (2011). The Dewey Lectures 2007: Self and Self-Understanding. Journal of Philosophy 108 (6).
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  39. Sylvia Burrow (2010). Review: The Self and Its Emotions, Kristján Kristjánsson. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Review 14 (20).
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  40. George Butterworth (1998). A Developmental-Ecological Perspective on Strawson's 'the Self'. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (2):132-140.
    Galen Strawson considers the self to be best described as a cognitive, `distinctively mental' phenomenon. He asserts that the mental sense of self comes to every normal human being in childhood and comprises the sense of being a mental presence, of being alone in one's head, with the body `just a vehicle or vessel for the mental thing that is what one really or most essentially is' . His thesis is determinedly cognitivist and it is with this that I take (...)
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  41. T. S. C. (1969). Reflection on Things at Hand. Review of Metaphysics 22 (4):749-750.
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  42. Joseph Call (2005). The Self and Other : A Missing Link in Comparative Social Cognition. In Herbert S. Terrace & Janet Metcalfe (eds.), The Missing Link in Cognition: Origins of Self-Reflective Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
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  43. David Ml A. Campbell (1991). Person to Person. Philosophical Books 32 (1):53-55.
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  44. G. Cantelli (1997). Truth, Error, Sin. Some Thoughts on the Theological Premises of Cartesian Metaphysics. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 52 (4):665-704.
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  45. Milic Capek (1953). The Reappearance of the Self in the Last Philosophy of William James. Philosophical Review 62 (October):526-544.
    The article surveys the development of james' views on the status of the psychological subject (self); the uncertainties and hesitations in james' views are pointed out. But, Contrary to the prevailing view, Upheld especially by john dewey and ralph b perry, James' article "does consciousness exist?" in 1904 does not represent the final stage of his thought. This can be found only in his last book "a pluralistic universe" six years later in which the existence of the "full self" is (...)
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  46. Herman Cappelen & Josh Dever (2013). The Inessential Indexical: On the Philosophical Insignificance of Perspective and the First Person. Oxford University Press.
    Cappelen and Dever present a forceful challenge to the standard view that perspective, and in particular the perspective of the first person, is a philosophically deep aspect of the world. Their goal is not to show that we need to explain indexical and other perspectival phenomena in different ways, but to show that the entire topic is an illusion.
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  47. Taylor Carman (1998). The Self After Postmodernity. Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):175-177.
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  48. Marie Carrière (2006). Feminism as a Radical Ethics? Questions for Feminist Researchers in the Humanities. Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):245-260.
    A feminist perspective on selfhood – bound to a perspective on otherness – is the main concern of this article. The resonance of this notion of selfhood both with ethical philosophy and with the language of humanism enables a deeper understanding of a feminist ethics as well as its internal tensions. The article considers the relationship of feminism and humanism as one of “paradoxical fluidity” rather than antithetical polarization, to explore the ways in which feminism’s alliance with contemporary ethics exemplifies (...)
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  49. Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.) (1985). The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press.
    The concept that peope have of themselves as a 'person' is one of the most intimate notions that they hold. Yet the way in which the category of the person is conceived varies over time and space. In this volume, anthropologists, philosophers, and historians examine the notion of the person in different cultures, past and present. Taking as their starting point a lecture on the person as a category of the human mind, given by Marcel Mauss in 1938, the contributors (...)
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  50. Peter Carruthers (2008). Meta-Cognition in Animals: A Skeptical Look. Mind and Language 23 (1):58–89.
    This paper examines the recent literature on meta-cognitive processes in non-human animals, arguing that in each case the data admit of a simpler, purely first-order, explanation. The topics discussed include the alleged monitoring of states of certainty and uncertainty, knowledge-seeking behavior in conditions of uncertainty, and the capacity to know whether or not the information needed to solve some problem is stored in memory. The first-order explanations advanced all assume that beliefs and desires come in various different strengths, or degrees.
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