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  1. Joseph Agassi (1971). Tautology and Testability in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):49-63.
    Economics is a science - at least positive economics must be. And science is in part applied mathematics, in part empirical observations and tests. Looking at the history of economics, one cannot find much testing done before the twentieth century, and even the collection of data, even in the manner Marx engaged in, was not common in his day. It is true that economic policy is an older field, and in that field much information is deployed for the purpose of (...)
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  2. Anna Alexandrova (2006). Connecting Economic Models to the Real World: Game Theory and the Fcc Spectrum Auctions. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (2):173-192.
    Can social phenomena be understood by analyzing their parts? Contemporary economic theory often assumes that they can. The methodology of constructing models which trace the behavior of perfectly rational agents in idealized environments rests on the premise that such models, while restricted, help us isolate tendencies, that is, the stable separate effects of economic causes that can be used to explain and predict economic phenomena. In this paper, I question both the claim that models in economics supply claims about tendencies (...)
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  3. George Argyrous, Disputing the Rhetoricist Creed.
    My intention here is to show that the rhetorical approach to economics is based on a doctrine (the McCloskeyian doctrine) which, at least in some respect, is flawed. I will argue that Donald McCloskey fails to establish three central thesis which this doctrine articulates: first, that the rhetorical approach can explain the success of economics, a fact that I will clearly challenge; second, that only “insiders” can and should set the scientific standards in economics, an idea I will vigorously reject; (...)
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  4. C. Arnsperger & Y. Varoufakis (2005). A Most Peculiar Failure: How Neoclassical Economics Turns Theoretical Failure Into Academic and Political Power. Erkenntnis 59:157-188.
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  5. Roger Backhouse (ed.) (1998). Explorations in Economic Methodology: From Lakatos to Empirical Philosophy of Science. Routledge.
    Is methodology fruitless? Intense controversy has resulted from attempts to understand economics through philosophy of science. This collection clarifies and responds to the issues raised, arguing that methodology is an essential activity.
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  6. Ravi Baghirathan, Codrina Rada & Lance Taylor (2004). Structuralist Economics: Worldly Philosophers, Models, and Methodology. Social Research: An International Quarterly 71 (2):305-326.
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  7. Michael Barram (forthcoming). Book Review: Being Consumed: Economics and Christian Desire. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (3):329-330.
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  8. Walter Block (2006). Fanatical, Not Reasonable: A Short Correspondence Between Walter Block and Milton Friedman. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (3):61-80.
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  9. Peter J. Boettke (1998). Formalism and Contemporary Economics: A Reply to Hausman, Heilbroner, and Mayer. Critical Review 12 (1-2):173-186.
    Abstract Economic formalism crowds out the analysis of change and adjustments to change under capitalism. The style of analytical narrative that was practiced by the first generation of neoclassical economists, in contrast, is more productive of genuine economic understanding. Despite Daniel Haus?man's challenging argument to the contrary, I maintain that Joseph Stiglitz's work is formalist at its core. While I agree with Robert Heilbroner's critique of contemporary economics, there is a limited sense in which nonformalist economics can rely on universalistic (...)
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  10. Peter J. Boettke (1997). Where Did Economics Go Wrong? Modern Economics as a Flight From Reality. Critical Review 11 (1):11-64.
    Abstract F. A. Hayek's realistic economic theory has been replaced by the formalistic use of equlibrium models that bear little resemblance to reality. These models are as serviceable to the right as to the left: they allow the economist either to condemn capitalism for failing to measure up to the model of perfect competition, or to praise capitalism as a utopia of perfect knowledge and rational expectations. Hayek, by contrast, used equilibrium to show that while capitalism is not perfect, it (...)
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  11. Thomas A. Boiflan & Paschal F. O'Gorman (1999). Critical Realism and Economics. In Steve Fleetwood (ed.), Critical Realism in Economics: Development and Debate. Routledge. 137.
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  12. Lawrence A. Boland (1971). Methodology as an Exercise in Economic Analysis. Philosophy of Science 38 (1):105-117.
  13. Lawrence A. Boland (1970). Conventionalism and Economic Theory. Philosophy of Science 37 (2):239-248.
    Roughly speaking all economists can be divided into two groups--those who agree with Milton Friedman and those who do not. Both groups, however, espouse the view that science is a series of approximations to a demonstrated accord with reality. Methodological controversy in economics is now merely a Conventionalist argument over which comes first--simplicity or generality. Furthermore, this controversy in its current form is not compatible with one important new and up and coming economic (welfare) theory called "the theory of the (...)
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  14. Jesús Zamora Bonilla, The Politics of Positivism: Disinterested Predictions From Interested Agents.
    Of the six sections composing «The Methodology of Posive Economics», the first one («The Relation between Positive and Normative Economics») is apparently the less discussed in the F53 literature, probably as a result of being the shortest one and the less relevant for the realism issue, all at once. In view of Milton Friedman’s subsequent career as a political preacher, it seems difficult not to wonder whether this first section ruled it the way the other five directed Friedman’s scientific performance. (...)
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  15. Jeroen Van Bouwel (2004). Explanatory Pluralism in Economics: Against the Mainstream? Philosophical Explorations 7 (3):299-315.
    Recent pleas for more heterodoxy in explaining economic action have been defending a pluralism for economics. In this article, I analyse these defences by scrutinizing the pluralistic qualities in the work of one of the major voices of heterodoxy, Tony Lawson. This scrutiny will focus on Lawson's alternatives concerning ontology and explanation to mainstream economics. Subsequently, I will raise some doubts about Lawson's pluralism, and identify questions that will have to be addressed by heterodox economists in order to maintain the (...)
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  16. Bruce Caldwell (2014). George Soros: Hayekian? Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):350-356.
    This paper examines many similarities in the methodological and ontological views of George Soros and Friedrich Hayek.
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  17. Bruce J. Caldwell (1984). Some Problems with Falsificationism in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (4):489-495.
  18. Gilles Campagnolo (2006). "Seuls les Extrémistes Sont Cohérents": Rothbard Et l'École Austro-Américaine Dans la Querelle de L'Herméneutique. Ens Éditions.
    " Seuls les extrémistes sont cohérents... " Rothbard et l'Ecole austro-américaine dans la querelle de l'herméneutique.
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  19. Edward M. Clift (2009). The Rhetoric of Economics. In A. Lunsford, K. Wilson & R. Eberly (eds.), Sage Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Sage. 197.
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  20. David Colander (2013). The Systemic Failure of Economic Methodologists. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):56 - 68.
    (2013). The systemic failure of economic methodologists. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 56-68. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774848.
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  21. Herman E. Daly (forthcoming). Reply to Mark Sagoff's" Carrying Capacity and Ecological Economics". BioScience.
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  22. Partha Dasgupta (2002). Modern Economics and its Critics. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction. Cambridge University Press. 57--89.
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  23. Bjørn-Ivar Davidsen (2005). Arguing Critical Realism: The Case of Economics. Journal of Critical Realism 4 (2):291-314.
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  24. Simon Deichsel (2011). Against the Pragmatic Justification for Realism in Economic Methodology. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):23-41.
    In recent times, realism in economic methodology hasincreasingly gained importance. Uskali Mäki and Tony Lawson are thebest-known realists within the discipline and even though theirapproaches are fundamentally different, both provide pragmatic defences of realism by claiming anti-realism to be the reasonfor the low quality of economic models. My paper will showthat a pragmatic defence of realism is untenable and furthermore, I willshow that for both Mäki’s and Lawson’s normative ideas there is noneed for realism.
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  25. Sheila C. Dow (2004). Structured Pluralism. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):275-290.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider how far the notion of schools of thought is compatible with methodological pluralism. Should economics instead be categorised simply as pluralist or non?pluralist? The notion of structured pluralism is developed, where categories, connections and (crucially) absence of connection apply at a variety of levels. Schools of thought provide some of that (provisional, mutable) structure, encapsulating, among other things, the use of language within each community. Awareness, and understanding, of the different categories and (...)
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  26. Sheila C. Dow (2003). 2 Critical Realism and Economics. In Paul Downward (ed.), Applied Economics and the Critical Realist Critique. Routledge. 12.
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  27. Paul Downward, Sheila Dowi & Steve Fleetwood (2006). Transforming Economics Through Critical Realism — Themes and Issues. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (1):139-182.
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  28. Paul Downward & Andrew Mearman (2009). Reorienting Economics Through Triangulation of Methods. In Edward Fullbrook (ed.), Ontology and Economics: Tony Lawson and His Critics. Routledge. 130--141.
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  29. Robert E. Emmer (1967). Economic Analysis and Scientific Philosophy. London, Allen & Unwin.
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  30. Schliesser Eric (2005). Galilean Reflections on Milton Friedman&Rsquo; S &Ldquo; Methodology of Positive Economics, &Rdquo; with Thoughts on Vernon Smith&Rsquo; S &Ldquo; Economics in the Laboratory&Rdquo. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1).
  31. W. Ettl & J. Junger (1991). Social Economics-a Critical-View. ARGUMENT 33 (4):527-540.
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  32. Susan F. Feiner (2003). 12 Reading Neoclassical Economics. In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge. 180.
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  33. Susan F. Feiner (1995). Reading Neoclassical Economics'. In Edith Kuiper & Jolande Sap (eds.), Out of the Margin: Feminist Perspectives on Economics. Routledge. 153.
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  34. Milton Friedman (2006). Fanatical, Not Reasonable: A Short Correspondence Between Walter Block and Milton Friedman. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (3):61-80.
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  35. Robert F. Garnett Jr (2004). 12 Rhetoric and Postmodernism in Economics. In John Bryan Davis & Alain Marciano (eds.), The Elgar Companion to Economics and Philosophy. Edward Elgar Pub..
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  36. Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen (1966). Analytical Economics: Issues and Problems. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
  37. Francesco Guala, An Ontology of Economics?
    Ontology is one of today’s buzzwords. It is back in fashion in analytical philosophy and Artificial Intelligence, and major projects and research centres get funding around the world (cf. e.g. the Buffalo Centre for Ontological Research, the Laboratory for Ontology in Turin, the Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical Information Science in Saarland). In the philosophy of science ontology has arguably always been a key area of research, under the guise of ‘The foundations of __’ (physics, biology, chemistry, etc.). Economics (...)
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  38. Francesco Guala (2006). Has Game Theory Been Refuted? Journal of Philosophy 103 (5):239-263.
    The answer in a nutshell is: Yes, five years ago, but nobody has noticed. Nobody noticed because the majority of social scientists subscribe to one of the following views: (1) the ‘anomalous’ behaviour observed in standard prisoner’s dilemma or ultimatum game experiments has refuted standard game theory a long time ago; (2) game theory is flexible enough to accommodate any observed choices by ‘refining’ players’ preferences; or (3) it is just a piece of pure mathematics (a tautology). None of these (...)
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  39. Susan Haack (2004). Science, Economics, 'Vision'. Social Research 71 (2):223-234.
    The focus here is Robert L. Heilbroner's critique, in the last chapter of the 7th edition of The Worldly Philosophers, of the idea that economics is, or should be, scientific. Heilbroner's conception of economics as essentially tied to capitalism is too narrow, and at odds with his own commentary on the rise of pauperism after the English common-land enclosures; and his critique of contemporary economics-as-social science is overdrawn. Nevertheless, there is indeed an important role for the “visionary” economics for which (...)
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  40. Frank Hahn & Martin Hollis (eds.) (1979). Philosophy and Economic Theory. Oxford University Press.
  41. Charles Hall, Dietmar Lindenberger, Reiner Kümmel, Timm Kroeger & Wolfgang Eichhorn (2001). The Need to Reintegrate the Natural Sciences with Economics Neoclassical Economics, the Dominant Form of Economics Today, has at Least Three Fundamental Flaws From the Perspective of the Natural Sciences, but It is Possible to Develop a Different, Biophysical Basis for Economics That Can Serve as a Supplement to, or a Replacement for, Neoclassical Economics. BioScience 51 (8):663-673.
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  42. J. Daniel Hammond (1994). The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics, Daniel M. Hausman. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992, Xi + 372 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):338-.
  43. D. Wade Hands (2006). Priority Fights in Economic Science: Paradox and Resolution. Perspectives on Science 14 (2):215-231.
    : Eponymic honor is a common form of professional recognition in economics, as it is in other sciences. There also seems to be convincing evidence that individuals exposed to economic theory behave less cooperatively and more self-interestedly than individuals who have not been exposed to such economic ideas. Taken together these two facts would seem to suggest that the history of economic thought would be a history of rather contentious priority fights. If economists generally behave in self-interested and non-cooperative ways, (...)
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  44. D. Wade Hands (2001). Economic Methodology is Dead - Long Live Economic Methodology: Thirteen Theses on the New Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):49-63.
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  45. D. Wade Hands (1992). Economics and the Philosophy of Science, Deborah A. Redman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991, Vii + 252 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 8 (02):298-303.
  46. Douglas W. Hands (1984). Blaug's Economic Methodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (1):115-125.
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  47. John Hart (2014). Frank Knight's 'Categories' and the Definition of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (3):290-307.
    In an attempt to combat the positivist view that the only legitimate way to conduct social science is in the manner of a natural science, Knight distinguished between positivist and non-positivist categories or levels of interpretation of human-social subject matter. Since each of the categories contained ‘a large element of truth’, Knight argued that any serious analysis would need to embrace a pluralist approach. In this paper I draw on four separate accounts he gave (in 1934, 1940, 1941, and 1942) (...)
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  48. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Philosophy of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences / William Bechtel and Mitchell Herschbach. Philosophy of Psychology / Edouard Machery. Philosophy of Sociology / Daniel Little. Philosophy of Economics. [REVIEW] In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell.
  49. Daniel M. Hausman, Philosophy of Economics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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  50. Daniel M. Hausman (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
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1 — 50 / 529