This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
213 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 213
  1. Anna Alexandrova & Robert Northcott (2004). The Scientific Study of Society, by Max Steuer. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003, XIII + 464 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):375-381.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Paul Anand (2003). Does Economic Theory Need More Evidence? A Balancing of Arguments. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):441-463.
    This article seeks to provide a characterization of theory prevalent in economics and found in many areas of social and natural science, particularly those that make increasing use of rational choice perspectives. Four kinds of theoretical project are identified in which empirical evidence plays a relatively small role in theory acceptance. The paper associates the minor role of evidence in theory formation and acceptance to a need to answer counterfactual questions and argues that is not necessarily incompatible with accounts of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard G. Anderson, William H. Greene, B. D. McCullough & H. D. Vinod (2008). The Role of Data/Code Archives in the Future of Economic Research. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):99-119.
    This essay examines the role of data and program?code archives in making economic research ?replicable.? Replication of published results is recognized as an essential part of the scientific method. Yet, historically, both the ?demand for? and ?supply of? replicable results in economics has been minimal. ?Respect for the scientific method? is not sufficient to motivate either economists or editors of professional journals to ensure the replicability of published results. We enumerate the costs and benefits of mandatory data and code archives, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard G. Anderson, William H. Greene, Bruce D. McCullough & Hrishikesh D. Vinod (2008). The Role of Data/Code Archives in the Future of Economic Research. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):99-119.
  5. Erik Angner (2006). Economists as Experts: Overconfidence in Theory and Practice. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):1-24.
    Drawing on research in the psychology of judgment and decision making, I argue that individual economists acting as experts in matters of public policy are likely to be victims of significant overconfidence. The case is based on the pervasiveness of the phenomenon, the nature of the task facing economists?as?experts, and the character of the institutional constraints under which they operate. Moreover, I argue that economist overconfidence can have dramatic consequences. Finally, I explore how the negative consequences of overconfidence can be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. G. C. Archibald (1979). Method and Appraisal in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (3):304-315.
  7. George Argyrous (1994). Kuhn's Paradigms and Neoclassical Economics: Reply to Dow. Economics and Philosophy 10 (01):123-.
  8. George Argyrous (1992). Kuhn's Paradigms and Neoclassical Economics. Economics and Philosophy 8 (02):231-248.
  9. H. W. Arndt (1944). The Ideal Foundations of Economic Thought: Three Essays on the Philosophy of Economics. By W. Stark. International Library of Sociology and Social Reconstruction. (Kegan Paul. 1943.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 19 (73):188-.
  10. Christian Arnsperger & Yanis Varoufakis (2008). Neoclassical Economics : Three Identifying Features. In Edward Fullbrook (ed.), Pluralist Economics. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.
  11. Emrah Aydinonat (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics, Harold Kincaid and Don Ross (Eds), Oxford University Press, 2009, Xviii + 670 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):317-324.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. N. Emrah Aydinonat (2010). Neuroeconomics: More Than Inspiration, Less Than Revolution. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):159-169.
    Gul and Pesendorfer (2008) argue that neuroeconomics is evidentially and explanatorily irrelevant to economics, because neuroeconomics and economics ask different questions and utilize different abstractions. They suggest neuroeconomics is only relevant as a source of inspiration for economists. The present paper accepts their basic premise and asks whether the fact that neuroeconomics and economics ask different questions implies that neuroeconomics is irrelevant. The paper argues that Gul and Pesendorfer overlook some important respects in which neuroeconomics is relevant for economics. First, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. N. Emrah Aydinonat (2007). Models, Conjectures and Exploration: An Analysis of Schelling's Checkerboard Model of Residential Segregation. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (4):429-454.
    This paper analyses and explicates the explanatory characteristics of Schelling's checkerboard model of segregation. It argues that the explanation of emergence of segregation which is based on the checkerboard model is a partial potential (theoretical) explanation. Yet it is also argued that despite its partiality, the checkerboard model is valuable because it improves our chances to provide better explanations of particular exemplifications of residential segregation. The paper establishes this argument by way of examining the several ways in which the checkerboard (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. R. E. Backhouse (2000). Reaffirming the Englightenment Vision A Review of Edward O. Wilson's Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (1):153-156.
  15. Roger E. Backhouse (2011). New Directions in Economics and the Philosophy of Economics? The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):305-311.
  16. Roger E. Backhouse (2010). Methodology in Action. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):3-15.
    This essay addresses the question, raised by Frank Hahn, of whether the study, by economists, of economic methodology is in practice beneficial. After considering what this statement could mean, and discussing the example of Lionel Robbins, it draws a number of conclusions: that methodological statements have unintended, context-dependent consequences, and that these may result from factors that should have nothing to do with economics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Roger E. Backhouse (2009). An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets , Donald MacKenzie. Mit Press, 2006, X + 377 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):99-106.
  18. Roger E. Backhouse (2004). Reflection Without Rules: Economic Methodology and Contemporary Science Theory, by Wade Hands. Cambridge University Press 2001, XI + 480 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):234-240.
  19. Roger E. Backhouse (2000). Symposium: Data Mining. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (2):171-277.
  20. Roger E. Backhouse (1997). An 'Inexact' Philosophy of Economics? Economics and Philosophy 13 (01):25-.
  21. Roger E. Backhouse (1996). Economics and the Antagonism of Time: Time, Uncertainty and Choice in Economic Theory, Douglas Vickers. University of Michigan Press, 1994, X + 272 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 12 (01):119-.
  22. D. Baker (1994). Review of James A. Caporaso and David P. Levine's Theories of Political Economy. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):354-354.
  23. Pierluigi Barrotta (1996). A Neo-Kantian Critique of Von Mises's Epistemology. Economics and Philosophy 12 (01):51-.
    More than many other Austrians, Mises tried to found aprioristic methodology on a well defined and developed epistemology. Although references to Kant are scattered rather unsystematically throughout his works, he nevertheless used an unequivocal Kantian terminology. He explicitly defended the existence of ‘a priori knowledge’, ‘synthetic a priori propositions’, ‘the category of action’, and so forth.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Clive Beed & Cara Beed (1996). A Christian Perspective on Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (1):91-112.
    Abstract Informed by theological perspectives and influenced by various schools of thought in economics, attempts have been made in recent decades to develop Christian understanding of economic matters. This paper explores some aspects of a Christian philosophy and methodology about economic issues, and concludes that they are incommensurable with secular thinking about the subject. Three propositions are investigated to demonstrate this contention. First is the inseparable interconnection in Christian thinking between the spiritual and material dimensions of human life; second is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Eric D. Beinhocker (2014). Reflexivity, Complexity, and the Nature of Social Science. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):330-342.
    In 1987, George Soros introduced his concepts of reflexivity and fallibility and has further developed and applied these concepts over subsequent decades. This paper attempts to build on Soros's framework, provide his concepts with a more precise definition, and put them in the context of recent thinking on complex adaptive systems. The paper proposes that systems can be classified along a ‘spectrum of complexity’ and that under specific conditions not only social systems but also natural and artificial systems can be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Marina Bianchi (1994). Truth Versus Precision in Economics, Mayer Thomas. Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1993. Economics and Philosophy 10 (01):145-.
  27. Mark Blaug (1987). Methodology with a Smallm. Critical Review 1 (2):1-5.
    THE RHETORIC OF ECONOMICS by Donald N. McCloskey Madison, Wis.: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985; 229 pp., $21.50.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Stephan Boehm & Karl Farmer (1993). Why the Acrimony? Reply to Davidson. Critical Review 7 (2-3):407-421.
    Our response to Davidson is two?pronged. First, we dispute the basis for his dismissal of Austrian economics as presented by O'Driscoll and Rizzo. In particular, we reject his claim, dictated entirely by his Post Keynesian perspective, concerning an ?identical axiomatic foundation? of Austrian and neoclassical economics. Second, we seek to show that Davidson's criticism of neoclassicism (and by implication of Austrianism) is based on a superficial, incorrect, and outmoded reading of neoclassical economics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Peter J. Boettke (1990). Individuals and Institutions. Critical Review 4 (1-2):10-26.
    ECONOMICS AND INSTITUTIONS: A MANIFESTO FOR MODERN INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMICS by Geoffrey Hodgson Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1988. 365pp., $39.95 Traditional institutional economics argued that the methodological individualism of both classical and neoclassical economics was grounded in a false conception of human nature and a pre?scientific understanding of economic life. Geoffrey Hodgson has provided a restatement of this position and extended the institutionalist critique to modern developments within economics at both a positive and normative level. In the course of doing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Lawrence A. Boland (2003). Methodological Criticismvs. Ideology and Hypocrisy. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):521-526.
    Milton Friedman's famous methodology essay is one of the most cited in economics literature. There was a time when it was usually cited as a prime example of positivist methodology. But since the publication of my 1979 critique of the critics of his essay, almost everyone now recognizes his essay as a prime example of what I called instrumentalism. Most economists, who when questioned about their views of methodology, will agree with Friedman's instrumentalism but only if Friedman's name is not (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Lawrence A. Boland (2001). Towards a Useful Methodology Discipline. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):3-10.
  32. Ivan A. Boldyrev (2011). Economic Methodology: Understanding Economics as a Science. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):427-432.
  33. Jesus P. Zamora Bonilla (2001). Where is Economic Methodology Going? Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):135-138.
  34. Marcel Boumans & Mary S. Morgan (2001). Ceteris Paribus Conditions: Materiality and the Application of Economic Theories. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):11-26.
  35. Alon Brav, J. B. Heaton & Alexander Rosenberg (2004). The Rational-Behavioral Debate in Financial Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (4):393-409.
    The contest between rational and behavioral finance is poorly understood as a contest over 'testability' and 'predictive success.' In fact, neither rational nor behavioral finance offer much in the way of testable predictions of improving precision. Researchers in the rational paradigm seem to have abandoned testability and prediction in favor of a scheme of ex post 'rationalizations' of observed price behavior. These rationalizations, however, have an unemphasized relevance for behavioral finance. While behavioral finance advocates may justly criticize rationalizations as unlikely (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michal Brzezinski & Michal Dzielinski (2009). Is Endogenous Growth Theory Degenerating? Another Look at Lakatosian Appraisal of Growth Theories. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):243-263.
    In a recent paper, Cavusoglu and Tebaldi (2006) provided an evaluation of neoclassical and endogenous growth theories according to Lakatos's methodology of scientific research programmes. This paper offers three criticisms of their contribution as well as a rival Lakatosian appraisal of growth theories. First, we hold that Cavusoglu and Tebaldi do not provide a proper structure of theory comparison in their contribution. Second, we argue that they use an inadequate version of Lakatos's appraisal criterion. Third, against the claim (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. M. Bunge (2007). Book Review: Gintis, H., Bowles, S., Boyd, R., & Fehr, E., Eds. (2005). Moral Sentiments and Material Interests. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pp. Xii + 404. US $50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):543-547.
  38. Bruce Caldwell (1994). Hayek's Scientific Subjectivism. Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):305-.
  39. Colin F. Camerer (2008). The Potential of Neuroeconomics. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):369-379.
    The goal of neuroeconomics is a mathematical theory of how the brain implements decisions, that is tied to behaviour. This theory is likely to show some decisions for which rational-choice theory is a good approximation (particularly for evolutionarily sculpted or highly learned choices), to provide a deeper level of distinction among competing behavioural alternatives, and to provide empirical inspiration for economics to incorporate more nuanced ideas about endogeneity of preferences, individual difference, emotions, endogeneous regulation of states, and so forth. I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter Carruthers (2002). Human Nature and the Limits of Science, John Dupré. Clarendon Press, 2001, 211 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):351-385.
  41. Filippo Cesarano (2006). Economic History and Economic Theory. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (4):447-467.
    Since the mid?1950s the spread of formal models and econometric method has greatly improved the study of the past, giving rise to the ?new? economic history; at the same time, the influence of economic history on economists and economics has markedly declined. This paper argues that the contribution of history to the advancement of economics is still paramount, as is evident from the evolution of monetary theory and institutions.JEL classification: NO1, A12.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Gisèle Chevalier & Richard Hudson (2001). The Use of Intentional Language in Scientific Articles in Finance. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (2):203-228.
    Rosenberg claims that economics must use the 'intentional idiom' for its explanatory strategies. We examine whether scientific articles in financial economics do in fact ascribe propositional attitudes to economic agents. We look at articles in the Journal of Finance , volume 54 (1999), where we find a total of 250 502 words in 29 articles. The total number of ascriptions of the intentional states of belief, desire, expectation or preference to economic agents is 137, with 26 of 29 articles making (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Christman (1997). Capitalism With Morality, D. W. Haslett. Clarendon Press, 1994, Xii + 280 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 13 (01):117-.
  44. Ménard Claude (2001). Methodological Issues in New Institutional Economic. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):85-92.
  45. François Claveau (2011). Evidential Variety as a Source of Credibility for Causal Inference: Beyond Sharp Designs and Structural Models. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):233-253.
    There is an ongoing debate in economics between the design-based approach and the structural approach. The main locus of contention regards how best to pursue the quest for credible causal inference. Each approach emphasizes one element ? sharp study designs versus structural models ? but these elements have well-known limitations. This paper investigates where a researcher might look for credibility when, for the causal question under study, these limitations are binding. It argues that seeking variety of evidence ? understood specifically (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John Coates (1996). The Claims of Common Sense: Moore, Wittgenstein, Keynes and the Social Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Moore, Wittgenstein, Keynes and the Social Sciences John Coates. Darwin's theory of natural selection offers a causal connection between subjective simplicity and objective truth in the following way. Innate subjective standards of simplicity ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. D. Colander (2000). Why Economists Are a Bit More Important Than Garbagemen A Review of Melvin Reder's Economics: The Culture of a Controversial Science. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (1):135-140.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. D. Colander (1997). Review of Thomas A. Boylan and Paschal F. O'Gorman's Beyond Rhetoric Methodology. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 13 (1):140-141.
  49. David Colander (2010). The Economics Profession, the Financial Crisis, and Method. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (4):419-427.
    In 2007?2008, the world economy came perilously close to a systemic failure in which a financial system collapse almost undermined the entire world economy as we know it. These events have led some to fault the economics profession for its failure to predict the crisis, and to ask whether the crisis will lead the economics profession to change its ways. In this paper, I will discuss these two issues, and then turn to some suggestions for institutional changes in the economics (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. David Colander (1995). Is Milton Friedman an Artist or a Scientist? Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (1):105-122.
    Most economists will agree that Milton Friedman is a brilliant economist. Yet, the majority assessment is that his work is ideologically flawed, and that the Marshallian economics he advocates has been superseded by Walrasian economics. In this paper I argue that the reason for this negative assessment is that Friedman, like Alfred Marshall before him, tried to straddle a fence between policy and logical-deductive theory, combining the artistic science of the historical and institutional school with the logical-deductive science of economics (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 213