This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
190 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 190
Material to categorize
  1. Joseph Agassi (1971). Tautology and Testability in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):49-63.
    Economics is a science - at least positive economics must be. And science is in part applied mathematics, in part empirical observations and tests. Looking at the history of economics, one cannot find much testing done before the twentieth century, and even the collection of data, even in the manner Marx engaged in, was not common in his day. It is true that economic policy is an older field, and in that field much information is deployed for the purpose of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Anna Alexandrova (2006). Connecting Economic Models to the Real World: Game Theory and the Fcc Spectrum Auctions. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (2):173-192.
    Can social phenomena be understood by analyzing their parts? Contemporary economic theory often assumes that they can. The methodology of constructing models which trace the behavior of perfectly rational agents in idealized environments rests on the premise that such models, while restricted, help us isolate tendencies, that is, the stable separate effects of economic causes that can be used to explain and predict economic phenomena. In this paper, I question both the claim that models in economics supply claims about tendencies (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Roger Backhouse (ed.) (1998). Explorations in Economic Methodology: From Lakatos to Empirical Philosophy of Science. Routledge.
    Is methodology fruitless? Intense controversy has resulted from attempts to understand economics through philosophy of science. This collection clarifies and responds to the issues raised, arguing that methodology is an essential activity.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peter J. Boettke (1998). Formalism and Contemporary Economics: A Reply to Hausman, Heilbroner, and Mayer. Critical Review 12 (1-2):173-186.
    Abstract Economic formalism crowds out the analysis of change and adjustments to change under capitalism. The style of analytical narrative that was practiced by the first generation of neoclassical economists, in contrast, is more productive of genuine economic understanding. Despite Daniel Haus?man's challenging argument to the contrary, I maintain that Joseph Stiglitz's work is formalist at its core. While I agree with Robert Heilbroner's critique of contemporary economics, there is a limited sense in which nonformalist economics can rely on universalistic (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Peter J. Boettke (1997). Where Did Economics Go Wrong? Modern Economics as a Flight From Reality. Critical Review 11 (1):11-64.
    Abstract F. A. Hayek's realistic economic theory has been replaced by the formalistic use of equlibrium models that bear little resemblance to reality. These models are as serviceable to the right as to the left: they allow the economist either to condemn capitalism for failing to measure up to the model of perfect competition, or to praise capitalism as a utopia of perfect knowledge and rational expectations. Hayek, by contrast, used equilibrium to show that while capitalism is not perfect, it (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Bruce J. Caldwell (1984). Some Problems with Falsificationism in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (4):489-495.
  7. Gilles Campagnolo (2006). "Seuls les Extrémistes Sont Cohérents": Rothbard Et l'École Austro-Américaine Dans la Querelle de L'Herméneutique. Ens Éditions.
    " Seuls les extrémistes sont cohérents... " Rothbard et l'Ecole austro-américaine dans la querelle de l'herméneutique.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Colander (2013). The Systemic Failure of Economic Methodologists. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):56 - 68.
    (2013). The systemic failure of economic methodologists. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 56-68. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774848.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Sheila C. Dow (2004). Structured Pluralism. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):275-290.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider how far the notion of schools of thought is compatible with methodological pluralism. Should economics instead be categorised simply as pluralist or non?pluralist? The notion of structured pluralism is developed, where categories, connections and (crucially) absence of connection apply at a variety of levels. Schools of thought provide some of that (provisional, mutable) structure, encapsulating, among other things, the use of language within each community. Awareness, and understanding, of the different categories and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Francesco Guala (2006). Has Game Theory Been Refuted? Journal of Philosophy 103 (5):239-263.
    The answer in a nutshell is: Yes, five years ago, but nobody has noticed. Nobody noticed because the majority of social scientists subscribe to one of the following views: (1) the ‘anomalous’ behaviour observed in standard prisoner’s dilemma or ultimatum game experiments has refuted standard game theory a long time ago; (2) game theory is flexible enough to accommodate any observed choices by ‘refining’ players’ preferences; or (3) it is just a piece of pure mathematics (a tautology). None of these (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Susan Haack (2004). Science, Economics, 'Vision'. Social Research 71 (2):223-234.
    The focus here is Robert L. Heilbroner's critique, in the last chapter of the 7th edition of The Worldly Philosophers, of the idea that economics is, or should be, scientific. Heilbroner's conception of economics as essentially tied to capitalism is too narrow, and at odds with his own commentary on the rise of pauperism after the English common-land enclosures; and his critique of contemporary economics-as-social science is overdrawn. Nevertheless, there is indeed an important role for the “visionary” economics for which (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Frank Hahn & Martin Hollis (eds.) (1979). Philosophy and Economic Theory. Oxford University Press.
  13. J. Daniel Hammond (1994). The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics, Daniel M. Hausman. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992, Xi + 372 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):338-.
  14. D. Wade Hands (2001). Economic Methodology is Dead - Long Live Economic Methodology: Thirteen Theses on the New Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):49-63.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. D. Wade Hands (1992). Economics and the Philosophy of Science, Deborah A. Redman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991, Vii + 252 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 8 (02):298-303.
  16. Douglas W. Hands (1984). Blaug's Economic Methodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (1):115-125.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Daniel M. Hausman (2010). Philosophy of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences / William Bechtel and Mitchell Herschbach. Philosophy of Psychology / Edouard Machery. Philosophy of Sociology / Daniel Little. Philosophy of Economics. [REVIEW] In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell.
  18. Daniel M. Hausman, Philosophy of Economics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Daniel M. Hausman (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Economics: An Anthology. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a comprehensive anthology of works concerning the nature of economics as a science, including classic texts and essays exploring specific branches and schools of economics. Apart from the classics, most of the selections in the third edition are new, as are the introduction and bibliography. No other anthology spans the whole field and offers a comprehensive introduction to questions about economic methodology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Daniel M. Hausman (2001). A New Era for Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):65-68.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Daniel M. Hausman (1999). Ontology and Methodology in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 15 (02):283-.
  22. Daniel M. Hausman (1999). The Handbook of Economic Methodology, John Davis, D. Wade Hands, and Uskali Mäki (Eds.). Edward Elgar, 1998, Xviii + 572 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 15 (02):289-.
  23. Daniel M. Hausman (1999). 'Ultra-Deductivism', Perfect Knowledge and the Methodology of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (1):125-130.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Daniel M. Hausman (1998). Separateness, Inexactness and Economic Method: A Very Brief Response. Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (1):155-156.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Daniel M. Hausman (1997). Theory Appraisal in Neoclassical Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (2):289-296.
    After answering relatively minor criticisms of The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics by Geert Reuten and Uskali Mäki, this essay grants their main charge that I could not sensibly defend the way economists assess theories while at the same time criticizing their insistence that economic theories be unified and of maximal scope. I should have said that economists are mistaken in their methods of assessment because they focus on the wrong data and because they unjustifiably insist that only unified (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Daniel M. Hausman (1996). Economics as Separate and Inexact. Economics and Philosophy 12 (02):207-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Daniel M. Hausman & Michael S. McPherson (1988). Standards. Economics and Philosophy 4 (01):1-.
  28. Martin O'Neill (2013). Economics After the Crisis, and the Crisis in Economics. Renewal 21 (2-3):132-43.
  29. Scott Scheall (forthcoming). Hayek the Apriorist? Journal of the History of Economic Thought.
    The paper aims to establish that Terence Hutchison’s argument in The Politics and Philosophy of Economics (1981) to the effect that the young F.A. Hayek maintained a methodological position markedly similar to that of Ludwig von Mises fails to establish the relevant conclusion. The first problem with Hutchison’s argument is that it is not clear exactly what conclusion he meant to establish with regard to the methodological views of the two paragons of 20th century Austrian economics. Mises (in)famously maintained a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Realism about Economics
  1. Paul Anand (2003). Does Economic Theory Need More Evidence? A Balancing of Arguments. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):441-463.
    This article seeks to provide a characterization of theory prevalent in economics and found in many areas of social and natural science, particularly those that make increasing use of rational choice perspectives. Four kinds of theoretical project are identified in which empirical evidence plays a relatively small role in theory acceptance. The paper associates the minor role of evidence in theory formation and acceptance to a need to answer counterfactual questions and argues that is not necessarily incompatible with accounts of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Siobhan Austen & Therese Jefferson (2006). Comparing Responses to Critical Realism. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):257-282.
    This article is a study of the response of two heterodox schools of economic thought to ?new? philosophical ideas. Specifically, it considers the response within Post Keynesian and feminist economics to Tony Lawson's recent call for economists to pay greater attention to ontology and for economists to adopt research methods consistent with critical realism. Lawson's arguments were formally introduced to these schools over the space of a few years and continue to generate considerable discussion within their ranks. The focus of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Andrew Brown (2007). Reorienting Critical Realism: A System‐Wide Perspective on the Capitalist Economy. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (4):499-519.
    This paper critiques the critical realist conception of social relations as ?deep? structures separate from ?surface? social activities. The alternative conception offered by ?systematic dialectics? is advocated. Systematic dialectics takes a system?wide perspective on the contemporary economic system. From this perspective, predominant social relations are inseparable from predominant social activities contra critical realism. For example, the predominance of commodity exchange relations across the economic system necessarily implies the predominance of the activities of commodity exchange. Likewise the predominance of monetary relations (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Victoria Chick & Sheila Dow (2005). The Meaning of Open Systems. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):363-381.
    There has been considerable discussion lately of the concept of open systems, which has revealed that different participants are using the terms ?openness? and ?closure? in different ways. The purpose of this paper is to address issues of meaning that arise in this particular discourse, with a view to clarifying both conflicts in usage and the underlying issues involved. We explore the different meanings of openness and closure extant in the literature, as applied at the ontological and epistemological levels, focusing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joshua Cohen (1995). Samuelson's Operationalist-Descriptivist Thesis. Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (1):53-78.
    This paper explores the influence of operationalism and its corollary, descriptivism, on Paul Samuelson's revealed preference theory as it developed between 1937 and 1948. Samuelson urged the disencumbering of metaphysics from economic theory. As an illustration, he showed how utility could be operationally redefined as revealed preference, and, furthermore, how from hypotheses such as maximizing behavior, operationally meaningful theorems could be deduced, thereby satisfying his demand for a scientific, empirical approach toward consumer behavior theory. In this paper I discuss the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. C. Tyler DesRoches (2009). Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (4):426-431.
  7. Sheila C. Dow (2004). Reorienting Economics: Some Epistemological Issues. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):307-312.
    Criticizes the book "Reorienting Economics," by Tony Lawson. Emphasis on the character of the middle ground between positivism and relativism; Conception of reality implicit in economic practice; Inconsistency between the methodology of orthodox economics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Paul Downward (ed.) (2003). Applied Economics and the Critical Realist Critique. Routledge.
    This intriguing new book examines and analyses the role of critical realism in economics and specifically how this line of thought can be applied to the real world. With contributions from such varying commentators as Sheila Dow, Wendy Olsen and Fred Lee, this new book is unique in its approach and will be of great interest to both economic methodologists and those involved in applied economic studies.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ross B. Emmett (2009). Realism and Relevance in the Economics of a Free Society: The Knight–Hutchison Debate. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):341-350.
    The methodological debate between Frank Knight and Terence Hutchison is usually framed in terms of the philosophical debates between positivism and intuitionism, or between empirical knowledge and theoretical knowledge. Hutchison's argument was, after all, a defense of the need for empirically-based economic knowledge, using the justificatory framework provided by logical positivism, and Knight was widely known for his defense of the understanding of economic theory often associated with Lionel Robbins. But the dispute between Knight and Hutchison was much more than (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Steve Fleetwood (ed.) (1999). Critical Realism in Economics: Development and Debate. Routledge.
    There is a growing perception among economists that their field is becoming increasingly irrelevant due to its disregard for reality. Critical realism addresses the failure of mainstream economics to explain economic reality and proposes an alternative approach. This book debates the relative strengths and weaknesses of critical realism, in the hopes of developing a more fruitful and relevant socio-economic ontology and methodology. With contributions from some of the leading authorities in economic philosophy, it includes the work of theorists critical of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Edward Fullbrook (ed.) (2009). Ontology and Economics: Tony Lawson and His Critics. Routledge.
    This original book brings together some of the world's leading critics of economics orthodoxy to debate Lawson's contribution to the economics literature.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Francesco Guala (2004). Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction, Edited by Uskali MÄKI. Cambridge University Press, 2002, VII + 384 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):217-223.
  13. Frank Hahn (1996). Rerum Cognoscere Causas. Economics and Philosophy 12 (02):183-.
  14. D. Hammes (2011). Reviews: Milton's Positivism Found Wanting. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):398-419.
    Milton Friedman’s 1953 essay created controversy and consternation amongst economists. It provided a prescription, based on empirically generated predictive success, of how to do economics, yet many saw it as a concession of the search for truth and theoretical beauty within the discipline. This article reviews a 50th anniversary festschrift devoted to views of the essay. The purpose of the volume is to provide today’s reader with the essay, responses, and a guide to interpreting it. The volume is selective and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Daniel M. Hausman (2000). Realist Philosophy and Methodology of Economics: What is It? Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (1):127-133.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Daniel M. Hausman (1998). Problems with Realism in Economics. Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):185-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Uskali Mäki (2013). Contested Modelling: The Case of Economics. In Ulrich Gähde, Stephan Hartmann & Jörn Henning Wolf (eds.), Models, Simulations, and the Reduction of Complexity. Walter de Gruyter. 87-106.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Uskali Mäki (2012). Realism and Antirealism About Economics. In , Handbook of the Philosophy of Economics. 3--24.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Uskali Mäki (2011). Puzzled by Realism: A Response to Deichsel. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):42-52.
    No realist project in and about economics is close to completion. There are many open issues that remain to be addressed and resolved. Simon Deichsel (2011) has written a healthy challenge that should offer some useful inspiration to anyone interested in assessing and perhaps contributing to the realist projects. He argues against realism and in support of some sort of anti-realism. My response first deals with some conceptual issues regarding the very ideas of realism and anti-realism. I will then discuss (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Uskali Mäki (2011). Puzzled by Realism: A Response to Deichsel. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):42-52.
    No realist project in and about economics is close to completion. There are many open issues that remain to be addressed and resolved. Simon Deichsel (2011) has written a healthy challenge that should offer some useful inspiration to anyone interested in assessing and perhaps contributing to the realist projects. He argues against realism and in support of some sort of anti-realism. My response first deals with some conceptual issues regarding the very ideas of realism and anti-realism. I will then discuss (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Uskali Mäki (2011). Scientific Realism as a Challenge to Economics (and Vice Versa). Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):1-12.
    The implications of scientific realism in regard to economics depend on what one takes scientific realism to mean and on whether one lets its contents to depend on the peculiar characteristics of the discipline of economics. Here a revisionist line is adopted and scientific realism is reduced to a minimal version that is able to accommodate as large a portion of science as possible. Among other things, characterizations of minimal realism do not require, as standard formulations of scientific realism do, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 190