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Siblings:History/traditions: The Sublime
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  1. Uygar Abaci (2010). Artistic Sublime Revisited: Reply to Robert Clewis. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):170-173.
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  2. Andrew Ashfield & Peter De Bolla (eds.) (1996). The Sublime: A Reader in British Eighteenth-Century Aesthetic Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of texts on the Sublime provides the historical context for the foundation and discussion of one of the most important aesthetic debates of the Enlightenment. The significance of the Sublime in the eighteenth century ranged across a number of fields - literary criticism, empirical psychology, political economy, connoisseurship, landscape design and aesthetics, painting and the fine arts, and moral philosophy - and has continued to animate aesthetic and theoretical debates to this day. However, the unavailability of many of (...)
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  3. Pedro Aullón de Haro (2007). La Sublimidad y Lo Sublime. Editorial Verbum.
    El presente ensayo consiste en una interpretación y reconstrucción histórica y teórica de lo sublime en tanto que alojable en el concepto más general que se establece de sublimidad, al tiempo que una indagación acerca de la constitución de una teoría de lo sublime.
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  4. Karl Axelsson (2007). The Sublime: Precursors and British Eighteenth Century Conceptions. Lang.
    This book explores the impulses behind the fascination for that experience.
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  5. Paul Binski (2010). Reflections on the "Wonderful Height and Size" of Gothic Great Churches and the Medieval Sublime. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  6. Remo Bodei (2008). Paesaggi Sublimi: Gli Uomini Davanti Alla Natura Selvaggia. Bompiani.
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  7. Andrew Chignell & Matthew C. Halteman (2012). Religion and the Sublime. In Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.), The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge.
    An effort to lay out a kind of taxomony of conceptual relations between the domains of the sublime and the religious. Warning: includes two somewhat graphic images. -/- .
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  8. Robert R. Clewis (2010). A Case for Kantian Artistic Sublimity: A Response to Abaci. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):167-170.
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  9. Robert R. Clewis (2009). The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    The Observations and the Remarks -- The Observations -- Forms of the sublime, and the grotesque -- Virtue -- The Remarks : history and background -- Four senses of freedom -- Enthusiasm : the passion of the sublime -- The judgment of the sublime -- Preliminary issues -- The mathematical and the dynamical sublime -- A third kind : the moral sublime -- Dependent and free sublimity -- The monstrous and the colossal -- Sublimity elicited by art -- Moral feeling (...)
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  10. Tom Cochrane (2012). The Emotional Experience of the Sublime. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):125-148.
    The literature on the venerable aesthetic category of the sublime often provides us with lists of sublime phenomena — mountains, storms, deserts, volcanoes, oceans, the starry sky, and so on. But it has long been recognized that what matters is the experience of such objects. We then find that one of the most consistent claims about this experience is that it involves an element of fear. Meanwhile, the recognition of the sublime as a category of aesthetic appreciation implies that attraction, (...)
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  11. Adam S. Cohen (2010). Magnificence in Miniature : The Case of Early Medieval Manuscripts. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  12. Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.) (2012). The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 'The sublime'. A short introduction to a long history Timothy M. Costelloe; Part I. Philosophical History of the Sublime: 1. Longinus and the ancient sublime Malcolm Heath; 2...And the beautiful? revisiting Edmund Burke's 'double aesthetics' Rodolphe Gasche; 3. The moral source of the Kantian sublime Melissa Meritt; 4. Imagination and internal sense: the sublime in Shaftesbury, Reid, Addison, and Reynolds Timothy M. Costelloe; 5. The associative sublime: Kames, Gerrard, Alison, and Stewart Rachel Zuckert; 6. The 'prehistory' (...)
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  13. Clayton Crockett (2001). A Theology of the Sublime. Routledge.
    Crockett develops a constructive radical theology from the philosophy of Kant. Reading The Critique of Judgment back into The Critique of Pure Reason, Crockett draws upon the insights of such continental philosophers as Heidegger, Derrida, Lyotard and Deleuze. This book shows how existential notions of self, time and imagination are interrelated in Kantian thinking, and demonstrates their importance for theology. An original theology of the sublime emerges as a connection is made between the Kantian sublime of the Third Critique and (...)
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  14. Peter De Bolla (1989). The Discourse of the Sublime: Readings in History, Aesthetics, and the Subject. Basil Blackwell.
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  15. J. de Mul (2013). The (Bio)Technological Sublime. Diogenes 59 (1-2):32-40.
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  16. Emma Dilon (2010). Listening to Magnificence in Medieval Paris. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  17. Ivan Džeparoski (2008). .
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  18. C. E. Emmer (2008). Crowther and the Kantian Sublime in Art. In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra & Guido A. de Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants: Akten des X. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses [Right and Peace in Kant's Philosophy: Proceedings of the 10th International Kant Congress] 5 vols. Walter de Gruyter.
    Paul Crowther, in his book, The Kantian Sublime (1989), works to reconstruct Kant's aesthetics in order to make its continued relevance to contemporary aesthetic concerns more visible. The present article remains within the area of Crowther's "cognitive" sublime, to show that there is much space for expanding upon Kantian varieties of the sublime, particularly in art.
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  19. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter.
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  20. Margot E. Fassler (2010). Helgaud of Fleury and the Liturgical Arts : The Magnification of Robert the Pious. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  21. Yi-hui Huang (2013). The Digital Sublime: Lessons From Kelli Connell's Double Life. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (4):70-79.
    The concept of the “sublime” has been discussed by a few philosophers. According to German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724–1804), the sublime refers to something “absolutely great,”1 such as the vast Sahara Desert or an earthquake, that surpasses one’s ability to comprehend with one’s reason. The sublime brings a mixture of anxiety and pleasure to those experiencing it: anxiety from the conflict between reason and imagination, and pleasure from the awareness of the supremacy of human reason. While Kant focuses on sublime (...)
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  22. C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.) (2010). Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  23. C. Stephen Jaeger (2010). Richard of St. Victor and the Medieval Sublime. In , Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  24. James Kirwan (2005). Sublimity: The Non-Rational and the Irrational in the History of Aesthetics. Routledge.
    In the history of aesthetics, few concepts have been as powerful and as elusive as the idea of the sublime, the "enthusiastic terror" that can possess us when we behold a mountain or a miracle. In his new book, James Kirwan traces the history of the sublime from its emergence in the eighteenth century to its resurgence in contemporary aesthetics. Sublimity addresses the nature of the sublime experience itself, and the function that experience has played, and continues to play, within (...)
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  25. Julien Levy (1936/1995). Surrealism. Da Capo Press.
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  26. Giovanni Lombardo (2011). Tra Poesia E Physiología: Il Sublime E la Scienza Della Natura. Mucchi.
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  27. Bonnie Mann (2006). Women's Liberation and the Sublime: Feminism, Postmodernism, Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Womens Liberation and the Sublime is a passionate report on the state of feminist thinking and practice after the linguistic turn. A critical assessment of masculinist notions of the sublime in modern and postmodern accounts grounds the author's positive and constructive recuperation of sublime experience in a feminist voice.
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  28. Areli Marina (2010). Magnificent Architecture in Late Medieval Italy. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  29. John Marmysz (2003). Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism. SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately is (...)
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  30. John Marmysz (2001). Humor, Sublimity and Incongruity. Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 2 (3).
    Humorous laughter is related to the sublime experience in that it involves the transformation of a potentially unpleasant perception into a pleasurable experience. However, whereas sublimity is associated with feelings of awe and respect, humorous laughter is associated with feelings of superiority and contempt. This difference is a result of the fact that sublimity is an affective response involving an individual’s perception of vulnerability while humorous laughter is a response involving perceived invulnerability.
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  31. Elisabetta Matelli (ed.) (2007). Il Sublime: Fortuna di Un Testo E di Un'idea. V&P.
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  32. Martino Rossi Monti (2010). Opus Es Magnificum" : The Image of God and the Aesthetics of Grace. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  33. Christopher Page (2010). The Magnificence of a Singer in Fifth-Century Gaul. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  34. Giuseppe Panella (2012). Storia Del Sublime: Dallo Pseudo Longino Alle Poetiche Della Modernità. Clinamen.
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  35. Giovanna Pinna (2007). Il Sublime Romantico: Storia di Un Concetto Sommerso. Centro Internazionale Studi di Estetica.
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  36. Baldine Saint Girons (2005). Le Sublime, de l'Antiquité à Nos Jours. Desjonquères.
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  37. Alberto Santamaría (2005). El Idilio Americano: Ensayos Sobre la Estética de Lo Sublime. Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca.
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  38. Danuta Shanzer (2010). Incessu Humilem, Successu Excesam" : Augustine, Sermo Humilis, and Scriptural [Upsos in Greek]. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  39. S. Shapshay (2013). Contemporary Environmental Aesthetics and the Neglect of the Sublime. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):181-198.
    Discussion of sublime response to natural environments is largely absent from contemporary environmental aesthetics. This is due to the fact that the sublime seems inextricably linked to extravagant metaphysical ideas. In this paper, I seek to rehabilitate a conception of sublime response that is secular, metaphysically modest and compatible with the most influential theory of environmental aesthetics, Allen Carlson’s scientific cognitivism. First, I offer some grounds for seeing the environmental sublime as a distinctive and meaningful category of contemporary aesthetic experience (...)
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  40. Philip Shaw (2006). The Sublime. Routledge.
    Often labelled as "indescribable," the sublime is a term that has been debated for centuries amongst writers, artists, philosophers and theorists. Usually related to ideas of the great, the awe-inspiring and the overpowering, the sublime has become a complex yet crucial concept in many disciplines. Offering historical overviews and explanations, Philip Shaw looks at: · The legacy of the earliest, classical theories of the sublime through the romantic to the post-modern and avant-garde sublimity · The major theorists of the sublime (...)
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  41. Eleonora Stoppino (2010). Error Left Me and Fear Came in its Place" : The Arrested Sublime of the Giants in Divine Comedy, Canto XXXI. In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  42. Dietmar Till (2006). Das Doppelte Erhabene: Eine Argumentationsfigur von der Antike Bis Zum Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts. Niemeyer.
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  43. Lap-Chuen Tsang (1998). The Sublime: Groundwork Towards a Theory. University of Rochester Press.
    An important work offering a viable theory for the concept of "Sublime" in philosophy.
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  44. Francesco Valagussa (2007). Il Sublime, da Dio All'io. Tascabili Bompiani.
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  45. Andrea Vierle (2004). Die Wahrheit des Poetisch-Erhabenen: Studien Zum Dichterischen Denken: Von der Antike Bis Zur Postmoderne. Königshausen & Neumann.
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  46. Luke White & Claire Pajaczkowska (eds.) (2009). The Sublime Now. Cambridge Scholars.
    This edited collection had its origins in a two-day conference held at the Tate Britain, organised collaboratively by research staff and students at Middlesex University and the London Consortium in order to celebrate the 250th Anniversary of the publication of Edmund Burke's famous book on the sublime. The conference was funded by Middlesex University, the London Consortium and the Tate Britain's AHRC-funded "Sublime Object: Nature, Art and Language" research project. The conference set out to critically examine the legacy of the (...)
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  47. Beth Williamson (2010). How Magnificent Was Medieval Art? In C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.), Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  48. Theodore E. B. Wood (1972). The Word "Sublime" and its Context, 1650 - 1760. The Hague,Mouton.
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  49. Joanna Zylinska (2001). On Spiders, Cyborgs, and Being Scared: The Feminine and the Sublime. Manchester University Press.
    This innovative book explores one of the most important concepts in contemporary cultural debates: the sublime. Joanna Zylinska looks at the consequences of feminism and its rethinking of sexual differences, and how it has led to the sublime tradition. She argues that what is generally considered aesthetics can now be more productive thought of in terms of ethics instead. Looking at a range of diverse discourses—Orlan's carnal art, philosophies of the everyday, the French feminism of Cixous and Irigaray, and the (...)
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