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  1. Raziel Abelson (1971). Further Reflections on Mind-Body Identity. Journal of Critical Analysis 3 (3):111-112.
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  2. Juan José Acero (2002). La Conciencia Explicada Por Dennett. Theoria 17 (1):81-112.
    This paper contains two sections. In the first one, some ideas on human mind Dennett presents in his book Consciousness Explained are sketched. In the second section, a critical review is made on Dennett's Multiple Drafts Theory. It is concluded that some of its proposals do not find enough experimental support from research on Cognitive Neuroscience. Even though there is no cardinal point in the brain, both functional and anatomical criteria can be found to distinguish conscious and unconscious information processing (...)
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  3. Peter Achinstein (1962). The Identity Hypothesis. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (50):167-171.
  4. Richard Acworth (1963). Smart on Free-Will. Mind 72 (286):271-272.
  5. Julian Albrecht-Gervasi (1969). Ontological Dimensions of Self-Consciousness in M. F. Sciacca's Idealism. Modern Schoolman 46 (4):289-299.
  6. Sophie Allen (2009). The Definition of Consciousness: Is Triviality or Falsehood Inevitable? Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (5):127-138.
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  7. Adrian Alsmith (2014). Eric Schwitzgebel: Perplexities of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):497-501.
    A glance at the contents of this book might be enough to persuade that it is absolutely required reading for anyone interested in the study of consciousness. The discussion is replete with insight into a number of neglected topics: colour in dream experience (chapter 1), echolocation in auditory experience (chapter 4) and closed-eye visualisations (chapter 8). More familiar themes such as the spatial qualities presented in visual experience (chapter 2), visual imagery (chapter 3), the introspectionist movement (chapter 5), conscious attention (...)
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  8. G. E. M. Anscombe, I. A. Apperly, A. Avramides, J. Barresi, K. Bartsch, E. Bates, M. Bekoff, M. R. Bennett, J. Bermudez & P. Bernier (2007). Campos, JJ, 152 Carpendale, JLM, 132nl7 Carpenter, M., 51, 52, 138 Carruthers, P., 19n4, 25, 128, 131nl5, 132n21, 133n23, 241n2. [REVIEW] In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press. 245.
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  9. István Aranyosi (2003). Physical Constituents of Qualia. Philosophical Studies 116 (2):103-131.
    ABSTRACT. In this paper I propose a defense of a posteriori materialism. Prob- lems with a posteriori identity materialism are identi?ed, and a materialism based on composition, not identity, is proposed. The main task for such a proposal is to account for the relation between physical and phenomenal properties. Compos- ition does not seem to be ?t as a relation between properties, but I offer a peculiar way to understand property-composition, based on some recent ideas in the literature on ontology. (...)
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  10. Peter Århem, Hans Liljenström & B. I. B. Lindahl (2003). Consciousness and Comparative Neuroanatomy: Report on the Agora Workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, on 21 August, 2002. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):85-88.
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  11. D. M. Armstrong (2006). Reply to Smart. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):177 – 178.
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  12. Bruce Aune (1988). Herbert Feigl. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988 (2):23 - 24.
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  13. Ciano Aydin (2015). The Artifactual Mind: Overcoming the ‘Inside–Outside’ Dualism in the Extended Mind Thesis and Recognizing the Technological Dimension of Cognition. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):73-94.
    This paper explains why Clark’s Extended Mind thesis is not capable of sufficiently grasping how and in what sense external objects and technical artifacts can become part of our human cognition. According to the author, this is because a pivotal distinction between inside and outside is preserved in the Extended Mind theorist’s account of the relation between the human organism and the world of external objects and artifacts, a distinction which they proclaim to have overcome. Inspired by Charles S. Peirce’s (...)
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  14. Bernard J. Baars (2006). Conscious Cognition and Blackboard Architectures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):70-71.
    van der Velde & de Kamps make a case for neural blackboard architectures to address four questions raised by human language. Unfortunately, they neglect a sizable literature relating blackboard architectures to other fundamental cognitive questions, specifically consciousness and voluntary control. Called “global workspace theory,” this literature integrates a large body of brain and behavioral evidence to come to converging conclusions.
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  15. Bernard J. Baars (1996). Understanding Subjectivity: Global Workspace Theory and the Resurrection of the Observing Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (3):211-17.
    The world of our experience consists at all times of two parts, an objective and a subjective part . . . The objective part is the sum total of whatsoever at any given time we may be thinking of, the subjective part is the inner 'state' in which the thinking comes to pass.
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  16. Bernard J. Baars (1988). The Functions of Consciousness. In , A Cognitive Theory of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
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  17. Bernard J. Baars & James Newman (1994). A Neurobiological Interpretation of Global Workspace Theory. In Antti Revonsuo & Matti Kamppinen (eds.), Consciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive Neuroscience. Lawrence Erlbaum. 211--226.
  18. George Bealer (1994). The Rejection of the Identity Thesis. In The Mind-Body Problem: A Guide to the Current Debate. Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  19. Christian Beenfeldt (2008). A Wake Up Call—or More Sweet Slumber? A Review of Daniel Dennett's Sweet Dreams: Philosophical Obstacles to a Science of Consciousness. Think 7 (19):85-92.
    Beenfeldt assesses Dennett's approach to the philosophical problem of consciousness.
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  20. José Bermúdez (2005). Properties, First-Order Representationalism and Reinforcement: Reply to Carruthers. Anthropology and Philosophy 6 (1/2):84-88.
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  21. Jose Luis Bermudez, Commentary on Carruthers' Phenomenal Consciousness.
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  22. Jose Luis Bermudez (1999). Categorizing Qualitative States: Some Problems. Anthropology and Philosophy 3 (2).
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  23. E. Bisiach (1992). Understanding Consciousness: Clues From Unilateral Neglect and Related Disorders. In A. David Milner & M. D. Rugg (eds.), The Neuropsychology of Consciousness. Academic Press. 237--253.
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  24. N. Block (2001). Paradox and Cross Purposes in Recent Work on Consciousness. Cognition 79 (1-2):197-219.
    Dehaene and Naccache, Dennett and Jack and Shallice “see convergence coming from many different quarters on a version of the neuronal global workspace model†(Dennett, p. 1). (Boldface references are to papers in this volume.) On the contrary, even within this volume, there are commitments to very different perspectives on consciousness. And these differing perspectives are based on tacit differences in philosophical starting places that should be made explicit.  Indeed, it is not clear that different uses of “consciousness†and (...)
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  25. Ned Block (2002). The Harder Problem of Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy 99 (8):391-425.
    consciousness comes about as a result of irritating nervous tissue, is just as unaccountable as the appearance of Djin when Aladdin rubbed his lamp.
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  26. Ned Block (1996). How Not to Find the Neural Correlate of Consciousness. In João Branquinho (ed.), [Book Chapter] (Unpublished). Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1.
    There are two concepts of consciousness that are easy to confuse with one another, access-consciousness and phenomenal consciousness. However, just as the concepts of water and H2O are different concepts of the same thing, so the two concepts of consciousness may come to the same thing in the brain. The focus of this paper is on the problems that arise when these two concepts of consciousness are conflated. I will argue that John Searle’s reasoning about the function of consciousness goes (...)
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  27. Denny E. Bradshaw (1991). Connectionism and the Specter of Representationalism. In Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (eds.), Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind. Kluwer. 417--436.
  28. Harold Brown (2006). Comment on Radical Externalism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (s 7-8):14-27.
  29. Jason Brown (2012). What is Consciousness? Process Studies 41 (1):21-41.
    This paper summarizes the main features of the microgenetic account of consciousness, of the transition from self to image, act and object, the epochal nature of this transition, and its relation to introspection, imagination, and agency. The affinities of microgenetic theory to many aspects of process thought should be evident to readers of this journal, but the theory, which was developed in pathological case study, rests on a wealth of clinical detail that is beyond the scope of this article. In (...)
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  30. Stuart M. Brown (1980). Harold R. Smart 4 May 1892 - 22 November 1979. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 53 (3):389 - 390.
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  31. Panayot K. Butchvarov (1980). Adverbial Theories of Consciousness. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 5 (3):261-80.
  32. Clark W. Butler (1972). The Mind-Body Problem: A Nonmaterialistic Identity Thesis. Idealistic Studies 2 (September):229-48.
    A defense of panpyschism based on Ockham's Razor, arguing against the materialistic identity thesis, e.g., J J C Smart.
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  33. Alex Byrne (2001). Phenomenal Consciousness. Peter Carruthers. Mind 110 (440):1057-1062.
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  34. Alex Byrne (2001). Review of Phenomenal Consciousness, by Peter Carruthers. [REVIEW] Mind 110:1057-62.
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  35. Whately Carington (1949). Matter, Mind and Meaning. New Haven: Yale University Press.
    Carington kindly placed at my disposal, because they seem to me to illustrate some of the main themes of this book.
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  36. Monima Chadha (2015). Meditation and Unity of Consciousness: A Perspective From Buddhist Epistemology. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):111-127.
    The paper argues that empirical work on Buddhist meditation has an impact on Buddhist epistemology, in particular their account of unity of consciousness. I explain the Buddhist account of unity of consciousness and show how it relates to contemporary philosophical accounts of unity of consciousness. The contemporary accounts of unity of consciousness are closely integrated with the discussion of neural correlates of consciousness. The conclusion of the paper suggests a new direction in the search for neural correlates of state consciousness (...)
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  37. Tim Chappell (1992). The Nature of Mind, Ed. David Rosenthal. Philosophy Now 3:43-44.
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  38. William C. Charron (1972). "Brain, Mind and Computers," by Stanley L. Jaki. Modern Schoolman 49 (3):270-273.
  39. Anthony Chemero (2000). Anti-Representationalism and the Dynamical Stance. Philosophy of Science 67 (4):625-647.
    Arguments in favor of anti-representationalism in cognitive science often suffer from a lack of attention to detail. The purpose of this paper is to fill in the gaps in these arguments, and in so doing show that at least one form of anti- representationalism is potentially viable. After giving a teleological definition of representation and applying it to a few models that have inspired anti- representationalist claims, I argue that anti-representationalism must be divided into two distinct theses, one ontological, one (...)
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  40. Reena Cheruvalath & Baiju (2001). Can Consciousness Be Explained? Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 18 (3):222-226.
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  41. Philip Clapson, The Theory of Brain-Sign: A Physical Alternative to Consciousness.
    Consciousness and the mind are prescientific concepts that begin with Greek theorizing. They suppose human rationality and reasoning placed in the human head by God, who structured the universe he created with the same kind of underlying characteristics. Descartes’ development of the model included scientific objectivity by placing the mind outside the physical universe. In its failure under evidential scrutiny and without physical explanation, this model is destined for terminal decline. Instead, a genuine biological and physical function for the brain (...)
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  42. Austen Clark (2008). Phenomenal Properties: Some Models From Psychology and Philosophy. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):406-425.
    Forthcoming in Philosophical Issues, vol 18, Interdisciplinary Core Philosophy: The Metaphysics and Perception of Qualities. Alex Byrne & David Hilbert, section editors.
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  43. Thomas W. Clark (2005). Killing the Observer. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):38-59.
    Phenomenal consciousness is often thought to involve a first-person perspective or point of view which makes available to the subject categorically private, first-person facts about experience, facts that are irreducible to third-person physical, functional, or representational facts. This paper seeks to show that on a representational account of consciousness, we don't have an observational perspective on experience that gives access to such facts, although our representational limitations and the phenomenal structure of consciousness make it strongly seem that we do. Qualia (...)
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  44. Axel Cleeremans, A Short Review of 'Consciousness in Action'.
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in which (...)
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  45. Axel Cleeremans (2008). Consciousness: The Radical Plasticity Thesis. In Rahul Banerjee & B. K. Chakrabarti (eds.), Models of Brain and Mind: Physical, Computational, and Psychological Approaches. Elsevier.
    In this chapter, I sketch a conceptual framework which takes it as a starting point that conscious and unconscious cognition are rooted in the same set of interacting learning mechanisms and representational systems. On this view, the extent to which a representation is conscious depends in a graded manner on properties such as its stability in time or its strength. Crucially, these properties are accrued as a result of learning, which is in turn viewed as a mandatory process that always (...)
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  46. Axel Cleeremans & Tiago V. Maia (2005). Consciousness: Converging Insights From Connectionist Modeling and Neuroscience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):397-404.
    Over the past decade, many findings in cognitive about the contents of consciousness: we will not address neuroscience have resulted in the view that selective what might be called the ‘enabling factors’ for conscious- attention, working memory and cognitive control ness (e.g. appropriate neuromodulation from the brain- stem, etc.). involve competition between widely distributed rep-.
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  47. Fabrice Clément & Abraham J. Malerstein (2003). What is It Like to Be Conscious? The Ontogenesis of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):67 – 85.
    In recent years, numerous studies have tried to highlight, from a naturalistic point of view, the apparent mysteries of consciousness. Many authors concentrated their efforts on explaining the phylogenetic origins of consciousness. Paradoxically, comments on the ontogenesis of consciousness are almost nonexistent. By crossing the results of psychology of development with a philosophical analysis, this paper aims to make up for this omission. After having characterized the different conceptual aspects of consciousness, we combine these, with observations made by developmental psychologists, (...)
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  48. Robert C. Coghill (2005). Pain: Making the Private Experience Public. In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.
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  49. Robert S. Cohen (1991). Bibliography of the Writings of Herbert Feigl. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 22 (1):195-200.
  50. Allan Combs & S. Kripner (2008). Collective Consciousness and the Social Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):264-276.
    This paper discusses supportive neurological and social evidence for 'collective consciousness', here understood as a shared sense of being together with others in a single or unified experience. Mirror neurons in the premotor and posterior parietal cortices respond to the intentions as well as the actions of other individuals. There are also mirror neurons in the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices which have been implicated in empathy. Many authors have considered the likely role of such mirror systems in the (...)
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