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  1. Avery Archer (2015). What is Direction of Fit? Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):241-249.
  2. Derek Baker (2010). Ambivalent Desires and the Problem with Reduction. Philosophical Studies 150 (1):37-47.
    Ambivalence is most naturally characterized as a case of conflicting desires. In most cases, an agent’s intrinsic desires conflict contingently: there is some possible world in which both desires would be satisfied. This paper argues, though, that there are cases in which intrinsic desires necessarily conflict—i.e., the desires are not jointly satisfiable in any possible world. Desiring a challenge for its own sake is a paradigm case of such a desire. Ambivalence of this sort in an agent’s desires creates special (...)
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  3. Andrew Brook (2006). Desire, Reward, Feeling: Commentary on Three Faces of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):157-164.
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  4. Keith Butler (1992). The Physiology of Desire. Journal of Mind and Behavior 13 (1):69-88.
    I argue, contrary to wide-spread opinion, that belief-desire psychology is likely to reduce smoothly to neuroscientific theory. I therefore reject P.M. Churchland's eliminativism and Fodor's nonreductive materialism. The case for this claim consists in an example reduction of the desire construct to a suitable construct in neuroscience. A brief account of the standard view of intertheoretic reduction is provided at the outset. An analysis of the desire construct in belief-desire psychology is then undertaken. Armed with these tools, the paper moves (...)
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  5. David K. Chan (2004). Are There Extrinsic Desires? Noûs 38 (2):326-50.
    An extrinsic desire is defined as a desire for something, not for its own sake, but for its supposed propensity to secure something else that one desires. I argue that the notion of ‘extrinsic desire’ is theoretically redundant. I begin by defining desire as a propositional attitude with a desirability characterization. The roles of desire and intention in practical reasoning are distinguished. I show that extrinsic desire does not have its own motivational role. I also show that extrinsic desire is (...)
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  6. J. E. Cheney (1978). The Intentionality of Desire and the Intentions of People. Mind 87 (October):517-532.
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  7. Fabio Ciaramelli (2006). Afterwards of Desire. Studia Phaenomenologica 6:97-115.
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  8. Elif Çırakman (2014). Enduring Desire: Becoming Spirit. Hegel-Jahrbuch 2014 (1).
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  9. Marc-Kevin Daoust (ed.) (2015). Le désir et la philosophie. Les Cahiers d'Ithaque.
    Quels désirs sont dignes de la raison ? Comment satisfaire nos désirs sans perdre le contrôle de soi ? Ce recueil offre un éclairage sur les différents aspects de ces problèmes. Nous proposons au lecteur un parcours historique, allant de Platon à Hume, sur la question du désir et sa place dans les textes fondateurs de la philosophie.
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  10. T. F. Daveney (1961). Wanting. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (April):135-144.
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  11. W. A. Davis (2007). Review: The Three Faces of Desire. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (461):220-225.
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  12. Wayne A. Davis (1986). Two Senses of Desire. In J. Marks (ed.), The Ways of Desire. Precedent 181-196.
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  13. Ronald De Sousa (2006). Dust, Ashes, and Vice: On Tim Schroeder's Theory of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):139-150.
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  14. Jörg Disse (2016). Desiderium. Eine Philosophie des Verlangens. Kohlhammer.
    Wonach verlangt der Mensch? Quod desiderat? Verlangen ist vielfältig, vielschichtig, oft widersprüchlich auf verschiedenste Ziele gerichtet: Von der Befriedigung einfachster, biologisch bedingter Bedürfnisse wie Hunger, Durst oder Sexualität, bis hin zu elaborierten Formen von Verlangen nach Selbstverwirklichung, sozialer Anerkennung oder religiöser Erfahrung. Wonach aber verlangt der Mensch letztendlich? Gibt es überhaupt ein letztes, für alle Menschen gleiches, höchstes Ziel des Verlangens? -/- Die Monographie untersucht "Verlangen" als ein Phänomen im Schnittmengenbereich von anthropologischer und psychologischer Philosophie. Sie setzt sich auseinander mit (...)
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  15. Mary Ann Doane (1993). Subjectivity and Desire: An (Other) Way of Looking. In Antony Easthope (ed.), Contemporary Film Theory. Longman
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  16. Fred Dretske (1966). Ziring Ziderata. Mind 75 (April):211-223.
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  17. Carl Duncan (2003). The Creative and Revolutionary Nature of Desire. Philosophy Today 47 (2):205-217.
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  18. Christopher G. Framarin (2006). The Desire You Are Required to Get Rid Of: A Functionalist Analysis of Desire in the Bhagavadgita. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):604-+.
    : Nisk?makarma is generally understood nonliterally as action done without desire of a certain sort. It is argued here that all desires are prohibited by nisk?makarma. Two objections are considered: (1) desire is a necessary condition of action, and (2) the Indian tradition as a whole accepts desire as a necessary condition of action. A distinction is drawn here between a goal and a desire, and it is argued that goals.
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  19. P. Fuery (1995). Theories of Desire. Melbourne University Press.
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  20. Christopher S. Hill, Comments on Timothy Schroeder's Three Faces of Desire.
    Department of Philosophy Brown University Providence, RI 02912.
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  21. R. B. K. Howe (1994). The Cognitive Nature of Desire. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):179-196.
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  22. Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Brentano's Evaluative-Attitudinal Account of Will and Emotion. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger.
    In contemporary analytic philosophy of mind, Franz Brentano is known mostly for his thesis that intentionality is ‘the mark of the mental.’ Among Brentano scholars, there are also lively debates on his theory of consciousness and his theory of judgment. Brentano’s theory of will and emotion is less widely discussed, even within the circles of Brentano scholarship. In this paper, I want to show that this is a missed opportunity, certainly for Brentano scholars but also for contemporary philosophy of mind. (...)
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  23. Noa Latham (2006). Three Compatible Theories of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):131-138.
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  24. Shen-yi Liao & Tyler Doggett (2014). The Imagination Box. Journal of Philosophy 111 (5):259-275.
    Imaginative immersion refers to a phenomenon in which one loses oneself in make-believe. Susanna Schellenberg says that the best explanation of imaginative immersion involves a radical revision to cognitive architecture. Instead of there being an attitude of belief and a distinct attitude of imagination, there should only be one attitude that represents a continuum between belief and imagination. -/- We argue otherwise. Although imaginative immersion is a crucial data point for theorizing about the imagination, positing a continuum between belief and (...)
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  25. Patricia Marino (2010). Moral Rationalism and the Normative Status of Desiderative Coherence. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (2):227-252.
    This paper concerns the normative status of coherence of desires, in the context of moral rationalism. I argue that 'desiderative coherence' is not tied to rationality, but is rather of pragmatic, instrumental, and sometimes moral value. This means that desire-based views cannot rely on coherence to support non-agent-relative accounts of moral reasons. For example, on Michael Smith's neo-rationalist view, you have 'normative reason' to do whatever your maximally coherent and fully informed self would want you to do, whether you want (...)
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  26. Joel Marks (ed.) (1986). The Ways of Desire: New Essays in Philosophical Psychology on the Concept of Wanting. Transaction Publishers.
    Collection of original essays on the theory of desire by Robert Audi, Annette Baier, Wayne Davis, Ronald de Sousa, Robert Gordon, O.H. Green, Joel Marks, Dennis Stampe, Mitchell Staude, Michael Stocker, and C.C.W. Taylor.
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  27. Joel Marks (1986). Introduction: On the Need for Theory of Desire. In J. Marks (ed.), The Ways of Desire. Precedent 1-15.
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  28. K. McDaniel & B. Bradley (2008). Desires. Mind 117 (466):267-302.
    We argue that desire is an attitude that relates a person not to one proposition but rather to two, the first of which we call the object of the desire and the second of which we call the condition of the desire. This view of desire is initially motivated by puzzles about conditional desires. It is not at all obvious how best to draw the distinction between conditional and unconditional desires. In this paper we examine extant attempts to analyse conditional (...)
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  29. Carolyn R. Morillo (1992). Reward Event Systems: Reconceptualizing the Explanatory Roles of Motivation, Desire and Pleasure. Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):7-32.
    A developing neurobiological/psychological theory of positive motivation gives a key causal role to reward events in the brain which can be directly activated by electrical stimulation (ESB). In its strongest form, this Reward Event Theory (RET) claims that all positive motivation, primary and learned, is functionally dependent on these reward events. Some of the empirical evidence is reviewed which either supports or challenges RET. The paper examines the implications of RET for the concepts of 'motivation', 'desire' and 'reward' or 'pleasure'. (...)
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  30. Neil Ormerod (2013). Desire and the Origins of Culture: Lonergan and Girard in Conversation. Heythrop Journal 54 (5):784-795.
    This paper explores differing accounts of the nature of desire, found in the works of Bernard Lonergan and René Girard, and their implications for our understanding of the origins or socio-cultural order. Using Lonergan's distinction between natural and elicited desires it argues that Girard's account of desire as mimetic may account for elicited desire, but may not account for natural desire, in Lonergan's account, as desire for meaning, truth and goodness. It then considers the implications for this distinction in our (...)
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  31. Peter Railton (2012). That Obscure Object, Desire. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 86 (2):22-46.
  32. Susanna Schellenberg (2013). Belief and Desire in Imagination and Immersion. Journal of Philosophy 110 (9):497-517.
    I argue that any account of imagination should satisfy the following three desiderata. First, imaginations induce actions only in conjunction with beliefs about the environment of the imagining subject. Second, there is a continuum between imaginations and beliefs. Recognizing this continuum is crucial to explain the phenomenon of imaginative immersion. Third, the mental states that relate to imaginations in the way that desires relate to beliefs are a special kind of desire, namely desires to make true in fiction. These desires (...)
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  33. Timothy Schroeder (2009). Desire. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 1 (6):631-639.
    To desire is to be in a particular state of mind. It is a state of mind familiar to everyone who has ever wanted to drink water or desired to know what has happened to an old friend, but its familiarity does not make it easy to give a theory of desire. Controversy immediately breaks out when asking whether wanting water and desiring knowledge are, at bottom, the same state of mind as others that seem somewhat similar: wishing never to (...)
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  34. Timothy Schroeder (2006). Reply to Critics. Dialogue 45 (1):165-174.
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  35. Timothy Schroeder (2006). Precis of Three Faces of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):125-130.
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  36. Timothy Schroeder (2004). Three Faces of Desire. Oxford University Press.
    To desire something is a condition familiar to everyone. It is uncontroversial that desiring has something to do with motivation, something to do with pleasure, and something to do with reward. Call these "the three faces of desire." The standard philosophical theory at present holds that the motivational face of desire presents its unique essence--to desire a state of affairs is to be disposed to act so as to bring it about. A familiar but less standard account holds the hedonic (...)
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  37. Qingsong Shen & Kwong-loi Shun (eds.) (2007). Confucian Ethics in Retrospect and Prospect. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
    desire. It is misleading to say that shu concerns the nature of desire in the ordinary sense, for it has more to do with the manner of satisfaction than ...
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  38. H. Sidgwick (1892). The Feeling-Tone of Desire and Aversion. Mind 1 (1):94-101.
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  39. N. Sinhababu (2009). The Humean Theory of Motivation Reformulated and Defended. Philosophical Review 118 (4):465-500.
    This essay defends a strong version of the Humean theory of motivation on which desire is necessary both for motivation and for reasoning that changes our desires. Those who hold that moral judgments are beliefs with intrinsic motivational force need to oppose this view, and many of them have proposed counterexamples to it. Using a novel account of desire, this essay handles the proposed counterexamples in a way that shows the superiority of the Humean theory. The essay addresses the classic (...)
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  40. Marco Solinas (2008). Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I). Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  41. Marco Solinas (2005). Desideri: fenomenologia degenerativa e strategie di controllo. In Mario Vegetti (ed.), Platone. La Repubblica. Bibliopolis vol. VI, 471-498.
  42. Marco Solinas (2005). La paternità dell’eros: il “Simposio” e Freud. In Gherardo Ugolini (ed.), Die Kraft der Vergangenheit – La forza del passato. Georg Olms Verlag 231-241.
  43. Shannon Spaulding (2015). Imagination, Desire, and Rationality. Journal of Philosophy 112 (9):457-476.
    We often have affective responses to fictional events. We feel afraid for Desdemona when Othello approaches her in a murderous rage. We feel disgust toward Iago for orchestrating this tragic event. What mental architecture could explain these affective responses? In this paper I consider the claim that the best explanation of our affective responses to fiction involves imaginative desires. Some theorists argue that accounts that do not invoke imaginative desires imply that consumers of fiction have irrational desires. I argue that (...)
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  44. Dennis W. Stampe (1986). Defining Desire. In J. Marks (ed.), The Ways of Desire. Precedent
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  45. Anita M. Superson (2005). Deformed Desires and Informed Desire Tests. Hypatia 20 (4):109-126.
    : The formal theory of rational choice as grounded in desire-satisfaction cannot account for the problem of such deformed desires as women's slavish desires. Traditional "informed desire" tests impose conditions of rationality, such as full information and absence of psychoses, but do not exclude deformed desires. I offer a Kantian-inspired addendum to these tests, according to which the very features of deformed desires render them irrational to adopt for an agent who appreciates her equal worth.
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  46. Paul R. Thagard (2006). Desires Are Not Propositional Attitudes. Dialogue 45 (1):151-156.
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  47. Richmond Thomason (1986). The Context-Sensitivity of Belief and Desire. In Michael Georgeff & Amy Lanksy (eds.), Reasoning about actions and plans. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc. 341-360.
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