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  1. Derek Baker (2010). Ambivalent Desires and the Problem with Reduction. Philosophical Studies 150 (1):37-47.
    Ambivalence is most naturally characterized as a case of conflicting desires. In most cases, an agent’s intrinsic desires conflict contingently: there is some possible world in which both desires would be satisfied. This paper argues, though, that there are cases in which intrinsic desires necessarily conflict—i.e., the desires are not jointly satisfiable in any possible world. Desiring a challenge for its own sake is a paradigm case of such a desire. Ambivalence of this sort in an agent’s desires creates special (...)
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  2. Andrew Brook (2006). Desire, Reward, Feeling: Commentary on Three Faces of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):157-164.
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  3. Keith Butler (1992). The Physiology of Desire. Journal of Mind and Behavior 13 (1):69-88.
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  4. David K. Chan (2004). Are There Extrinsic Desires? Noûs 38 (2):326-50.
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  5. J. E. Cheney (1978). The Intentionality of Desire and the Intentions of People. Mind 87 (October):517-532.
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  6. T. F. Daveney (1961). Wanting. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (April):135-144.
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  7. Wayne A. Davis (1986). Two Senses of Desire. In J. Marks (ed.), The Ways of Desire. Precedent. 181-196.
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  8. Ronald De Sousa (2006). Dust, Ashes, and Vice: On Tim Schroeder's Theory of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):139-150.
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  9. Fred Dretske (1966). Ziring Ziderata. Mind 75 (April):211-223.
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  10. Christopher G. Framarin (2006). The Desire You Are Required to Get Rid Of: A Functionalist Analysis of Desire in the Bhagavadgita. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):604-+.
    : Nisk?makarma is generally understood nonliterally as action done without desire of a certain sort. It is argued here that all desires are prohibited by nisk?makarma. Two objections are considered: (1) desire is a necessary condition of action, and (2) the Indian tradition as a whole accepts desire as a necessary condition of action. A distinction is drawn here between a goal and a desire, and it is argued that goals.
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  11. P. Fuery (1995). Theories of Desire. Melbourne University Press.
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  12. Christopher S. Hill, Comments on Timothy Schroeder's Three Faces of Desire.
    Department of Philosophy Brown University Providence, RI 02912.
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  13. R. B. K. Howe (1994). The Cognitive Nature of Desire. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):179-196.
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  14. Noa Latham (2006). Three Compatible Theories of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):131-138.
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  15. Shen-yi Liao & Tyler Doggett (forthcoming). The Imagination Box. Journal of Philosophy.
    Imaginative immersion refers to a phenomenon in which one loses oneself in make-believe. Susanna Schellenberg says that the best explanation of imaginative immersion involves a radical revision to cognitive architecture. Instead of there being an attitude of belief and a distinct attitude of imagination, there should only be one attitude that represents a continuum between belief and imagination. -/- We argue otherwise. Although imaginative immersion is a crucial data point for theorizing about the imagination, positing a continuum between belief and (...)
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  16. Patricia Marino (2010). Moral Rationalism and the Normative Status of Desiderative Coherence. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (2):227-252.
    This paper concerns the normative status of coherence of desires, in the context of moral rationalism. I argue that 'desiderative coherence' is not tied to rationality, but is rather of pragmatic, instrumental, and sometimes moral value. This means that desire-based views cannot rely on coherence to support non-agent-relative accounts of moral reasons. For example, on Michael Smith's neo-rationalist view, you have 'normative reason' to do whatever your maximally coherent and fully informed self would want you to do, whether you want (...)
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  17. Joel Marks (1986). On the Need for Theory of Desire. In Joel Marks & Roger Ames (eds.), The Ways of Desire. Precedent.
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  18. Joel Marks (ed.) (1986). The Ways of Desire: New Essays in Philosophical Psychology on the Concept of Wanting. Transaction Publishers.
    Collection of original essays on the theory of desire by Robert Audi, Annette Baier, Wayne Davis, Ronald de Sousa, Robert Gordon, O.H. Green, Joel Marks, Dennis Stampe, Mitchell Staude, Michael Stocker, and C.C.W. Taylor.
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  19. Kris McDaniel & Ben Bradley (2008). Desires. Mind 117 (466):267 - 302.
    It is not at all obvious how best to draw the distinction between conditional and unconditional desires. In this paper we examine extant attempts to analyse conditional desire. From the failures of those attempts, we draw a moral that leads us to the correct account of conditional desires. We then extend the account of conditional desires to an account of all desires. It emerges that desires do not have the structure that they have been thought to have. We attempt to (...)
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  20. Carolyn R. Morillo (1992). Reward Event Systems: Reconceptualizing the Explanatory Roles of Motivation, Desire and Pleasure. Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):7-32.
    A developing neurobiological/psychological theory of positive motivation gives a key causal role to reward events in the brain which can be directly activated by electrical stimulation (ESB). In its strongest form, this Reward Event Theory (RET) claims that all positive motivation, primary and learned, is functionally dependent on these reward events. Some of the empirical evidence is reviewed which either supports or challenges RET. The paper examines the implications of RET for the concepts of 'motivation', 'desire' and 'reward' or 'pleasure'. (...)
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  21. Neil Ormerod (2013). Desire and the Origins of Culture: Lonergan and Girard in Conversation. Heythrop Journal 54 (5):784-795.
    This paper explores differing accounts of the nature of desire, found in the works of Bernard Lonergan and René Girard, and their implications for our understanding of the origins or socio-cultural order. Using Lonergan's distinction between natural and elicited desires it argues that Girard's account of desire as mimetic may account for elicited desire, but may not account for natural desire, in Lonergan's account, as desire for meaning, truth and goodness. It then considers the implications for this distinction in our (...)
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  22. Susanna Schellenberg (2013). Belief and Desire in Imagination and Immersion. Journal of Philosophy 110 (9):497-517.
    I argue that any account of imagination should satisfy the following three desiderata. First, imaginations induce actions only in conjunction with beliefs about the environment of the imagining subject. Second, there is a continuum between imaginations and beliefs. Recognizing this continuum is crucial to explain the phenomenon of imaginative immersion. Third, the mental states that relate to imaginations in the way that desires relate to beliefs are a special kind of desire, namely desires to make true in fiction. These desires (...)
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  23. Timothy Schroeder (2009). Desire. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 1 (6):631-639.
    To desire is to be in a particular state of mind. It is a state of mind familiar to everyone who has ever wanted to drink water or desired to know what has happened to an old friend, but its familiarity does not make it easy to give a theory of desire. Controversy immediately breaks out when asking whether wanting water and desiring knowledge are, at bottom, the same state of mind as others that seem somewhat similar: wishing never to (...)
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  24. Timothy Schroeder (2006). Precis of Three Faces of Desire. Dialogue 45 (1):125-130.
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  25. Timothy Schroeder (2006). Reply to Critics. Dialogue 45 (1):165-174.
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  26. Timothy Schroeder (2004). Three Faces of Desire. Oxford University Press.
    To desire something is a condition familiar to everyone. It is uncontroversial that desiring has something to do with motivation, something to do with pleasure, and something to do with reward. Call these "the three faces of desire." The standard philosophical theory at present holds that the motivational face of desire presents its unique essence--to desire a state of affairs is to be disposed to act so as to bring it about. A familiar but less standard account holds the hedonic (...)
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  27. Qingsong Shen & Kwong-loi Shun (eds.) (2007). Confucian Ethics in Retrospect and Prospect. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
    desire. It is misleading to say that shu concerns the nature of desire in the ordinary sense, for it has more to do with the manner of satisfaction than ...
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  28. H. Sidgwick (1892). The Feeling-Tone of Desire and Aversion. Mind 1 (1):94-101.
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  29. Marco Solinas (2012). Via Platonica zum Unbewussten. Platon und Freud. Turia + Kant.
    Solinas’ Studie untersucht den Einfluss von Platons Anschauungen von Traum, Wunsch und Wahn auf den jungen Freud. Anhand der Untersuchung einiger zeitgenössischer kulturwissenschaftlicher Arbeiten, die bereits in die ersten Ausgabe der Traumdeutung Eingang fanden, wird Freuds nachhaltige Vertrautheit mit den platonischen Lehren erläutert und seine damit einhergehende direkte Textkenntnis der thematisch relevanten Stellen aus Platons Staat aufgezeigt. Die strukturelle Analogie von Freud’schem und platonischem Seelenbegriff wird inhaltlich am Traum als »Königsweg zum Unbewussten«, in dem von Freud selbst angesprochenen Verhältnis von (...)
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  30. Marco Solinas (2008). Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros. Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  31. Marco Solinas (2005). Desideri: fenomenologia degenerativa e strategie di controllo. In Mario Vegetti (ed.), Platone. La Repubblica. Bibliopolis. vol. VI, 471-498.
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  32. Marco Solinas (2005). La paternità dell’eros: il “Simposio” e Freud. In Gherardo Ugolini (ed.), Die Kraft der Vergangenheit – La forza del passato. Georg Olms Verlag. 231-241.
  33. Marco Solinas (2004). Unterdrückung, Traum und Unbewusstes in Platons „Politeia“ und bei Freud. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):90-112.
    The essay concerns the reconstruction of the repression of desires, with reference to the analysis of their oneiric emersions expounded in the Republic, in comparison with Freud’s conception. Plato’s concept of suppression according to which specific desires are enslaved, so that they can find satisfaction usually only in dreams seems consistent with Freud’s concept of remotion; therefore both the condition of the suppressed desires and the intrapsychic place of their enslavement seem to be interpretable in the light of Freud’s concept (...)
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  34. Dennis W. Stampe (1986). Defining Desire. In J. Marks (ed.), The Ways of Desire. Precedent.
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  35. Anita M. Superson (2005). Deformed Desires and Informed Desire Tests. Hypatia 20 (4):109-126.
    : The formal theory of rational choice as grounded in desire-satisfaction cannot account for the problem of such deformed desires as women's slavish desires. Traditional "informed desire" tests impose conditions of rationality, such as full information and absence of psychoses, but do not exclude deformed desires. I offer a Kantian-inspired addendum to these tests, according to which the very features of deformed desires render them irrational to adopt for an agent who appreciates her equal worth.
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  36. Paul R. Thagard (2006). Desires Are Not Propositional Attitudes. Dialogue 45 (1):151-156.
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