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  1. Emmanuel Alloa (2014). Phantasia. Aristoteles' Theorie der Sichtbarmachung. In Gottfried Boehm, Emmanuel Alloa, Orlando Budelacci & Gerald Wildgruber (eds.), Imagination. Suchen und Finden. W. Fink
  2. Andrew Arana (2016). Imagination in Mathematics. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 463-477.
  3. Alessandro Bertinetto (2012). Bild. Fichte Und der "Iconic Turn". Fichte-Studien 36:269-284.
  4. Robert E. Brennan (1941). The Thomistic Concept of Imagination. New Scholasticism 15 (2):149-161.
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  5. Robert Briscoe (2011). Mental Imagery and the Varieties of Amodal Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):153-173.
    The problem of amodal perception is the problem of how we represent features of perceived objects that are occluded or otherwise hidden from us. Bence Nanay (2010) has recently proposed that we amodally perceive an object's occluded features by imaginatively projecting them into the relevant regions of visual egocentric space. In this paper, I argue that amodal perception is not a single, unitary capacity. Drawing appropriate distinctions reveals amodal perception to be characterized not only by mental imagery, as Nanay suggests, (...)
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  6. Thomas Busch (1996). Sartre and Ricoeur on Imagination. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (4):507-518.
  7. David Carrier (1973). Three Kinds of Imagination. Journal of Philosophy 70 (22):819-831.
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  8. Edward S. Casey (1992). The World of the Imagination. Review of Metaphysics 46 (1):145-146.
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  9. Edward S. Casey (1976). Imagining: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.
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  10. Cam Clayton (2011). The Psychical Analogon in Sartre's Theory of the Imagination. Sartre Studies International 17 (2):16-27.
    Sartre's theory of the imagination is important both as an alternative to the idea that the imagination consists of images contained somehow in the mind - the "illusion of immanence" — and as an early formulation of Sartre's conception of consciousness. In this paper I defend Sartre's theory of imaginative consciousness against some of its critics. I show how difficulties with his theory parallel a perennial problem in Sartre-interpretation, that of understanding how consciousness can negate its past and posit possibilities (...)
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  11. Frederick C. Copleston (1950). The Psychology of Imagination. By Jean-Paul Sartre. Philosophical Library. (New York. 1948. Pp. 285. Price $3.75.). Philosophy 25 (92):89-.
  12. Luca Corti (2012). Crossing the Line: Sellars on Kant on Imagination. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 41 (1-3):41-71.
    After Science and Metaphysics, Sellars’ encounter with Kant was characterized by acknowledging and working out the role played by imagination in perceptual experience. The mediating imaginative function provided him with a somewhat new and more Kantian account of the relationship between concepts and intuitions. After stressing the peculiar theoretical and exegetical background of Sellars’ approach to Kant – his project of “translating” his own ideas in the lingua franca of Kantianism – which has been influential in current normative interpretations of (...)
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  13. Tyler Doggett (2012). Some Questions for Tamar Szabo Gendler. [REVIEW] Analysis 72 (4):764-774.
    Contribution to a symposium on Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology.
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  14. Tyler Doggett (2011). Review of Tamar Szabo Gendler's Intuition, Imagination, and Philosophical Methodology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  15. Fabian Dorsch (2016). Hume. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 40-54.
    This chapter overviews Hume’s thoughts on the nature and role of imagining and focusses primarily on three important distinctions that Hume draws among our conscious mental episodes: (i) between impressions and ideas; (ii) between ideas of the memory and ideas of the imagination; and (iii), among the ideas of the imagination, between ideas of the judgement and ideas of the fancy. In addition, the chapter considers Hume’s views on the imagination as a faculty of producing ideas, as well as on (...)
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  16. Fabian Dorsch (2015). Focused Daydreaming and Mind-Wandering. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (4):791-813.
    In this paper, I describe and discuss two mental phenomena which are somewhat neglected in the philosophy of mind: focused daydreaming and mind-wandering. My aim is to show that their natures are rather distinct, despite the fact that we tend to classify both as instances of daydreaming. The first difference between the two, I argue, is that, while focused daydreaming is an instance of imaginative mental agency, mind-wandering is not—though this does not mean that mind-wandering cannot involve mental agency at (...)
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  17. Fabian Dorsch (2013). Hume and the Recreative Imagination. Rivista di Estetica 53 (2):25-54.
    Two particular approaches to the imagination as a recreative capacity have recently gained prominence: neo-Humeanism and simulationatism. According to neo-Humeanism, imaginings have cognitions as a constitutive part of their representational contents; while simulationalists maintain that, in imagining, we essentially simulate the occurrence of certain cognitive states. Two other kinds of constitutive dependence, that figure regularly in the debate, concern the necessity of cogni­tions for, respectively, the causation and the semantic power of imaginings. In what follows, I dis­cuss each of these (...)
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  18. Fabian Dorsch (2013). Hume e l'immaginazione ricreativa. Rivista di Estetica 53 (53):25-54.
  19. Fabian Dorsch (2012). The Unity of Imagining. Ontos.
    Please send me an email (fabian.dorsch@unifr.ch) if you wish to receive a copy of the book. — 'In this highly ambitious, wide ranging, immensely impressive and ground-breaking work Fabian Dorsch surveys just about every account of the imagination that has ever been proposed. He identifies five central types of imagining that any unifying theory must accommodate and sets himself the task of determining whether any theory of what imagining consists in covers these five paradigms. Focussing on what he takes to (...)
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  20. Fabian Dorsch (2011). Visualising as Imagining Seeing. Kongress-Akten der Deutschen Gesellschaft Für Philosophie 22:1-16.
    In this paper, I would like to put forward the claim that, at least in some central cases, visualising consists literally in imagining seeing. The first section of my paper is concerned with a defence of the specific argument for this claim that M. G. F. Martin presents in his paper 'The Transparency of Experience' (Martin 2002). This argument has been often misunderstood (or ignored), and it is worthwhile to discuss it in detail and to illus­trate what its precise nature (...)
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  21. Fabian Dorsch (2011). Emotional Imagining and Our Responses to Fiction. Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 46:153-176.
    The aim of this article is to present the disagreement between Moran and Walton on the nature of our affective responses to fiction and to defend a view on the issue which is opposed to Moran’s account and improves on Walton’s. Moran takes imagination-based affective responses to be instances of genuine emotion and treats them as episodes with an emotional attitude towards their contents. I argue against the existence of such attitudes, and that the affective element of such responses should (...)
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  22. Fabian Dorsch (2005). Review: Hegel's Theory of Imagination. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (3):309-311.
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  23. Fabian Dorsch (2005). Imagination and the Will. Dissertation, University College London
    The principal aim of my thesis is to provide a unified theory of imagining, that is, a theory which aspires to capture the common nature of all central forms of imagining and to distinguish them from all paradigm instances of non-imaginative phenomena. The theory which I intend to put forward is a version of what I call the Agency Account of imagining and, accordingly, treats imaginings as mental actions of a certain kind. More precisely, it maintains that imaginings are mental (...)
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  24. Mark P. Drost (1990). The Primacy of Perception in Husserl's Theory of Imagining. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (3):569-582.
  25. Arthur D. Fearon (1940). The Imagination. New Scholasticism 14 (2):181-195.
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  26. Steven Fesmire (2010). Ecological Imagination. Environmental Ethics 32 (2):183-203.
    Environmental thinkers recognize that ecological thinking has a vital role to play in many wise choices and policies; yet, little theoretical attention has been given to developing an adequate philosophical psychology of the imaginative nature of such thinking. Ecological imagination is an outgrowth of our more general deliberative capacity to perceive, in light of possibilities for thinking and acting, the relationships that constitute any object. Such imagination is of a specifically ecological sort when key metaphors, images, symbols, and the like (...)
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  27. Steven Fesmire (2005). Cultivating EcologicaI Imagination. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 9 (2):339-352.
  28. Véronique M. Fóti (1986). The Cartesian Imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (4):631-642.
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  29. Christoph Hoerl (2005). Review: Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology, by Gregory Currie and Ian Ravenscroft. Mind and Language 20 (5):559-564.
  30. Robert Hopkins (forthcoming). Sartre. In Amy Kind (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 82-93.
    In The Imaginary Sartre offers a systematic, insightful and heterodox account of imagining in many forms. Beginning with four ‘characteristics’ he takes to capture the phenomenology of imagining, he draws on considerations both philosophical and psychological to describe the deeper nature of the state that has those features. The result is a view that remains the most potent challenge to the Humean orthodoxy that to this day dominates both philosophical and psychological thinking on the topic.
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  31. Eliot D. Hutchinson (1927). The “ Faculty “ of Imagination: An Enquiry Concerning the Existence of a General “ Faculty,” or Group Factor of Imagination. By H. L. Hargreaves. British Journal of Psychology. Monograph Supplements, X””. [REVIEW] Philosophy 2 (8):574.
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  32. David Jager, A. Martinez & C. Thiboutot (1999). Gaston Bachelard and Phenomenology: Outline of a Theory of the Imagination. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 30 (1):1-17.
    Gaston Bachelard's thought remains a continual source of inspiration for a phenomenological psychology that takes human habitation as a fundamental given and as an abiding mystery of the human condition. the following essay explores the ideas Bachelard developed in the course of his study of poetry. It examines in particular his vision of imagination as a unique passage way by means of which we reach an inhabitable, intersubjective and fully human world. Within that perspective, our lives are constantly renewed by (...)
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  33. Julia Jansen (2005). On the Development of Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology of Imagination and its Use for Interdisciplinary Research. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):121-132.
    In this paper I trace Husserl’s transformation of his notion of phantasy from its strong leanings towards empiricism into a transcendental phenomenology of imagination. Rejecting the view that this account is only more incompatible with contemporary neuroscientific research, I instead claim that the transcendental suspension of naturalistic (or scientific) pretensions precisely enables cooperation between the two distinct realms of phenomenology and science. In particular, a transcendental account of phantasy can disclose the specific accomplishments of imagination without prematurely deciding upon a (...)
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  34. Mostyn W. Jones (1994). The Roots of Imagination. Dissertation, The University of Manchester
    This work presents a new theory of imagination which tries to overcome the overly narrow perpectives that current theories take upon this enigmatic, multi-faceted phenomenon. Current theories are narrowly preoccupied with images and imagery. This creates problems in explaining (1) what imagination is, (2) how it works, and (3) what its strengths and limitations are. (1) Ordinary language identifies imagination with both imaging (image-making) and creativity, but most current theories identify imagination narrowly with imaging while neglecting creativity. Yet imaging is (...)
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  35. Amy Kind (ed.) (2016). The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge.
    Imagination occupies a central place in philosophy, going back to Aristotle. However, following a period of relative neglect there has been an explosion of interest in imagination in the past two decades as philosophers examine the role of imagination in debates about the mind and cognition, aesthetics and ethics, as well as epistemology, science and mathematics. This outstanding _Handbook_ contains over thirty specially commissioned chapters by leading philosophers organised into six clear sections examining the most important aspects of the philosophy (...)
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  36. Amy Kind (2013). The Heterogeneity of the Imagination. Erkenntnis 78 (1):141-159.
    Imagination has been assigned an important explanatory role in a multitude of philosophical contexts. This paper examines four such contexts: mindreading, pretense, our engagement with fiction, and modal epistemology. Close attention to each of these contexts suggests that the mental activity of imagining is considerably more heterogeneous than previously realized. In short, no single mental activity can do all the explanatory work that has been assigned to imagining.
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  37. Amy Kind & Peter Kung (eds.) (2016). Knowledge Through Imagination. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Imagination is celebrated as our vehicle for escape from the mundane here and now. It transports us to distant lands of magic and make-believe, and provides us with diversions during boring meetings or long bus rides. Yet the focus on imagination as a means of escape from the real world minimizes the fact that imagination seems also to furnish us with knowledge about it. Imagination seems an essential component in our endeavor to learn about the world in which we live--whether (...)
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  38. Jürgen Klein, Vera Damm & Angelika Giebeler (1983). An Outline of a Theory of Imagination. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 14 (1):15-23.
    Imagination can be seen 1) as a mental faculty common to all people to some degree and 2) as an important principle in literary theory. We must think of imagination not as a simple power but a complex series of processes, involving the impression-idea-relationship and memory. The data derived thus are still bound to their epistemological context, and only imagination provides the possibility to transcend the space-time-determination and the cause-effect-relationship, so that it allows a freer display of the sense-data. This (...)
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  39. Uriah Kriegel (2015). Perception and Imagination. In S. Miguens, G. Preyer & C. Bravo Morando (eds.), Prereflective Consciousness: Sartre and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Routledge 245-276.
    According to a traditional view, there is no categorical difference between the phenomenology of perception and the phenomenology of imagination; the only difference is in degree (of intensity, resolution, etc.) and/or in accompanying beliefs. There is no categorical difference between what it is like to perceive a dog and what it is like to imagine a dog; the former is simply more vivid and/or is accompanied by the belief that a dog is really there. A sustained argument against this traditional (...)
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  40. Peter Langland-Hassan (2016). On Choosing What to Imagine. In A. Kind & P. Kung (eds.), Knowledge Through Imagination. Oxford University Press 61-84.
    If imagination is subject to the will, in the sense that people choose the content of their own imaginings, how is it that one nevertheless can learn from what one imagines? This chapter argues for a way forward in addressing this perennial puzzle, both with respect to propositional imagination and sensory imagination. Making progress requires looking carefully at the interplay between one’s intentions and various kinds of constraints that may be operative in the generation of imaginings. Lessons are drawn from (...)
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  41. Peter Langland-Hassan (2012). Pretense, Imagination, and Belief: The Single Attitude Theory. Philosophical Studies 159 (2):155-179.
    A popular view has it that the mental representations underlying human pretense are not beliefs, but are “belief-like” in important ways. This view typically posits a distinctive cognitive attitude (a “DCA”) called “imagination” that is taken toward the propositions entertained during pretense, along with correspondingly distinct elements of cognitive architecture. This paper argues that the characteristics of pretense motivating such views of imagination can be explained without positing a DCA, or other cognitive architectural features beyond those regulating normal belief and (...)
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  42. Peter Langland‐Hassan (2015). Imaginative Attitudes. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (3):664-686.
    The point of this paper is to reveal a dogma in the ordinary conception of sensory imagination, and to suggest another way forward. The dogma springs from two main sources: a too close comparison of mental imagery to perceptual experience, and a too strong division between mental imagery and the traditional propositional attitudes (such as belief and desire). The result is an unworkable conception of the correctness conditions of sensory imaginings—one lacking any link between the conditions under which an imagining (...)
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  43. Peter Langland‐Hassan (2014). What It Is to Pretend. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (1):397-420.
    Pretense is a topic of keen interest to philosophers and psychologists. But what is it, really, to pretend? What features qualify an act as pretense? Surprisingly little has been said on this foundational question. Here I defend an account of what it is to pretend, distinguishing pretense from a variety of related but distinct phenomena, such as (mere) copying and practicing. I show how we can distinguish pretense from sincerity by sole appeal to a person's beliefs, desires, and intentions – (...)
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  44. Shen-yi Liao & Tyler Doggett (2014). The Imagination Box. Journal of Philosophy 111 (5):259-275.
    Imaginative immersion refers to a phenomenon in which one loses oneself in make-believe. Susanna Schellenberg says that the best explanation of imaginative immersion involves a radical revision to cognitive architecture. Instead of there being an attitude of belief and a distinct attitude of imagination, there should only be one attitude that represents a continuum between belief and imagination. -/- We argue otherwise. Although imaginative immersion is a crucial data point for theorizing about the imagination, positing a continuum between belief and (...)
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  45. Lorne Loxterkamp (1977). Imagination. By Mary Warnock. London: Faber and Faber, 1976. Pp. 213. $25.50. Dialogue 16 (3):547-548.
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  46. Patricia M. Matthews (1996). Kant's Theory of Imagination. Review of Metaphysics 49 (4):923-925.
  47. Kourken Michaelian, Stanley B. Klein & Karl K. Szpunar (forthcoming). The Past, the Present, and the Future of Future-Oriented Mental Time Travel: Editors' Introduction. In Kourken Michaelian, Stanley B. Klein & Karl K. Szpunar (eds.), Seeing the Future: Theoretical Perspectives on Future-Oriented Mental Time Travel. Oxford University Press
  48. Kengo Miyazono & Shen-yi Liao (2016). The Cognitive Architecture of Imaginative Resistance. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. 233-246.
    Where is imagination in imaginative resistance? We seek to answer this question by connecting two ongoing lines of inquiry in different subfields of philosophy. In philosophy of mind, philosophers have been trying to understand imaginative attitudes’ place in cognitive architecture. In aesthetics, philosophers have been trying to understand the phenomenon of imaginative resistance. By connecting these two lines of inquiry, we hope to find mutual illumination of an attitude (or cluster of attitudes) and a phenomenon that have vexed philosophers. Our (...)
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  49. Dermot Moran (1989). The Wake of Imagination. [REVIEW] Irish Philosophical Journal 6 (2):311-314.
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  50. Bence Nanay (2016). The Role of Imagination in Decision-Making. Mind and Language 31 (1):126-142.
    The psychological mechanism of decision-making has traditionally been modeled with the help of belief-desire psychology: the agent has some desires (or other pro-attitudes) and some background beliefs and deciding between two possible actions is a matter of comparing the probability of the satisfaction of these desires given the background beliefs in the case of the performance of each action. There is a wealth of recent empirical findings about how we actually make decisions that seems to be in conflict with this (...)
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