This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
133 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 133
Material to categorize
  1. Fred Adams (2012). Extended Cognition Meets Epistemology. Philosophical Explorations 15 (2):107 - 119.
    This article examines the intersection of the theory of extended mind/cognition and theory of knowledge. In the minds of some, it matters to conditions for knowing whether the mind extends beyond the boundaries of body and brain. I examine these intuitions and find no support for this view from tracking theories of knowledge. I then argue that the apparent difference extended mind is supposed to have for ability or credit theories is also illusory.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Fred Adams (2005). Tracking Theories of Knowledge. Veritas 50 (4):1-35.
    As teorias epistemológicas do rastreamento sustentam que o conhecimento é uma relação real entre o agente cognitivo e seu ambiente. Os estados cognitivos de um agente epistêmico fazem o rastreamento da verdade das proposições que são objeto de conhecimento ao embasarem a crença em indicadores confiáveis da verdade (evidência, razões, ou métodos de formação de crença). A novidade nessa abordagem é que se dá pouca ênfase no tipo de justificação epistêmica voltada ao fornecimento de procedimentos de decisão doxástica ou regras (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Fred Adams & Murray Clarke (2005). Resurrecting the Tracking Theories. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (2):207 – 221.
    Much of contemporary epistemology proceeds on the assumption that tracking theories of knowledge, such as those of Dretske and Nozick, are dead. The word on the street is that Kripke and others killed these theories with their counterexamples, and that epistemology must move in a new direction as a result. In this paper we defend the tracking theories against purportedly deadly objections. We detect life in the tracking theories, despite what we perceive to be a premature burial.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John A. Barker & Fred Adams (2012). Conclusive Reasons, Knowledge, and Action. Philosophical Issues 22 (1):35-52.
  5. Niels Ole Bernsen (1978). Knowledge: A Treatise on Our Cognitive Situation. Odense University Press.
  6. Steffen Borge (2008). Stanley on the Knowledge-Relation. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):109-124.
    The latest newcomer on the epistemology scene is Subject-Sensitive Invariantism (SSI), which is the view that even though the semantics of the verb “know” is invariant, the answer to the question of whether someone knows something is sensitive to factors about that person. Factors about the context of the purported knower are relevant to whether he knows some proposition p or not. In this paper I present Jason Stanley's version of SSI, a theory Stanley calls Interest-Relative Invariantism (IRI). The core (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jessica Brown (2013). Impurism, Practical Reasoning, and the Threshold Problem. Noûs 47 (1):179-192.
    I consider but reject one broad strategy for answering the threshold problem for fallibilist accounts of knowledge, namely what fixes the degree of probability required for one to know? According to the impurist strategy to be considered, the required degree of probability is fixed by one's practical reasoning situation. I distinguish two different ways to implement the suggested impurist strategy. According to the Relevance Approach, the threshold for a subject to know a proposition at a time is determined by the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jessica Brown (2012). Practial Reasoning, Decision Theory and Anti-Intellectualism. Episteme 9 (1):1-20.
    In this paper, I focus on the most important form of argument for anti-intellectualism, one that exploits alleged connections between knowledge and practical reasoning. I first focus on a form of this argument which exploits a universal principle, Sufficiency, connecting knowledge and practical reasoning. In the face of putative counterexamples to Sufficiency, a number of authors have attempted to reformulate the argument with a weaker principle. However, I argue that the weaker principles suggested are also problematic. I conclude that, so (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Lawrence R. Carleton (1982). Justification and Knowledge: New Studies in Epistemology. Edited by George Pappas. Modern Schoolman 60 (1):60-61.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Quassim Cassam (2009). The Possibility of Knowledge • by Quassim Cassam • Oxford University Press, 2007. X + 256 Pp. £32.00 Cloth: Summary. [REVIEW] Analysis 69 (2):307-309.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Quassim Cassam (2007). The Possibility of Knowledge. Grazer Philosophische Studien 74 (1):125-141.
    I focus on two questions: what is knowledge, and how is knowledge possible? The latter is an example of a how-possible question. I argue that how-possible questions are obstacle-dependent and that they need to be dealt with at three different levels, the level of means, of obstacle-removal, and of enabling conditions. At the first of these levels the possibility of knowledge is accounted for by identifying means of knowing, and I argue that the identification of such means also contributes to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Albert Casullo (2012). Essays on A Priori Knowledge and Justification: Essays. OUP USA.
    The past twenty-five years have seen a major renewal of interest in the topic of a priori knowledge. In the sixteen essays collected here, which span this entire period, philosopher Albert Casullo documents the complex set of issues motivating the renewed interest, identifies the central epistemological questions, and provides the leading ideas of a unified response to them. Throughout the essays, Casullo offers a systematic treatment of the concept of a priori knowledge, the existence of a priori knowledge, and the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Albert Casullo, Annotated Bibliography on A Priori Knowledge.
    Contents 1. Introduction 2. General Overviews 3. Textbooks 4. Anthologies 5. Historical Background to the Contemporary Debate 6. General Accounts 7. Mathematical Knowledge 8. Logical Knowledge 9. Intuitions and Conceptual Analysis 10. Modal Knowledge a. Overviews b. Primary Sources 11. Testimonial Knowledge 12. Naturalism 13. Scepticism 14. New Developments..
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jonathan Cohen, Philosophy 111: Contemporary Work in Metaphysics and Epistemology.
    This course is an introduction to contemporary work in epistemology -- roughly, the theory of knowledge -- and metaphysics -- roughly, the theory of what there is in the world. As such, the course will be devoted to fundamental questions about the world and our knowledge of it. What is matter? How is a priori knowledge possible? What does it mean for evidence to confirm a theory? In addressing these topics, we'll also discuss classic paradoxes involving truth, vagueness, space-time, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jonathan Cohen, Philosophy 132: Epistemology.
    This is a course in recent and contemporary approaches to the theory of knowledge. We'll be looking at some of the major debates in epistemology, including those over the structure of knowledge, the proper analysis of knowledge, justification, and related notions, as well as some meta-epistemological issues that have arisen in recent discussions of so-called naturalized epistemology. The course will not presuppose any exposure to the relevant literatures, and will be a broad overview of some of the going accounts and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Richard Foley, Epistemology.
    In epistemology Chisholm was a defender of FOUNDATIONALISM [S]. He asserted that any proposition that it is justified for a person to believe gets at least part of its justification from basic propositions, which are themselves justified but not by anything else. Contingent propositions are basic insofar as they correspond to selfpresenting states of the person, which for Chisholm are states such that whenever one is in the state and believes that one is in it, one’s belief is maximally justified. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Charles Edward Gauss (1943). Epistemology, Referential or Representative? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 3 (3):349-359.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Wesley H. Holliday (forthcoming). Fallibilism and Multiple Paths to Knowledge. Oxford Studies in Epistemology 5.
  19. Peter D. Klein (1982). Reply to Professor Odegard. Philosophical Books 23 (4):409-19.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Henri Lauener (1977). Ferdinand Gonseth 1890-1975. Dialectica 31 (1-2):113-118.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Scott MacDonald (1993). Theory of Knowledge. In Norman Kretzman & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Aquinas. Cambridge University Press. 160.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Scott MacDonald (1993). Theory of Knowledge. In Norman Kretzman & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Aquinas. Cambridge University Press. 160.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Luca Moretti (2012). Patrick Greenough and Duncan Pritchard (Eds.), Williamson on Knowledge, Oxford: OUP (2009). [REVIEW] Mind 121 (484):1069-1073.
  24. Anna Mudde (2008). Karen Barad's Agential Realism and Reflexive Epistemic Authority. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 25:65-75.
    Feminist and post-colonial epistemologists, philosophers of science, and thinkers more generally may find themselves in a distinct form of difficult situation regarding their access to and authority over knowledge within the academic world. Because feminist and post-colonial approaches to knowledge require an acute awareness of relations of domination and the ways in which these pervade the social and epistemic world, it is often difficult to know how to proceed in making theory. These theorists are in particularly ripe positions to benefit (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Antonio Nunziante (2010). Sulla struttura “a specchio” della mente in Leibniz. Tra solipsismo e concezione organica della materia. Rivista di Filosofia 2 (2):243-268.
    One of the symbolic images to which Leibniz constantly entrusted the synthesis of his own thought regards the idea of looking upon the same city from different perspectives. This is an image that is diffused throughout all Leibniz's writings and it clearly reflects the philosopher's passion for matters regarding perspective as well as optical phenomena. The point of view of the inhabitants who look at it can be therefore compared to a mirror which reflects a certain portion of reality, according (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Pollock (1970/1975). Knowledge and Justification. Princeton University Press.
    Princeton University Press, 1974. This book is out of print, but can be downloaded as a pdf file (5 MB).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Vincent G. Potter (1986). Philosophy of Knowledge. Distributed by Fordham University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Bertrand Russell (2009). Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits. Routledge.
    First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Wesley C. Salmon (1974). Human Knowledge. Duckworth.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Sean Sayers (1989). Knowledge as a Social Phenomenon. Radical Philosophy 52 (52):34-7.
    The idea that knowledge is a social phenomenon is no longer either novel or unfamiliar. With the growth of the social sciences, we are accustomed to seeing ideas and beliefs in social and historical terms, and trying to understand how they arise and why they take the forms that they do. Philosophers, however, are only gradually coming to terms with these views. For they call in question ideas about the nature of knowledge which have dominated epistemology since the seventeenth century.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Robert K. Shope (1984). Cognitive Abilities, Conditionals, and Knowledge: A Response to Nozick. Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):29-48.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. John Turri (forthcoming). From Virtue Epistemology to Abilism: Theoretical and Empirical Developments. In Tbd (ed.), TBD.
    I review several theoretical and empirical developments relevant to assessing contemporary virtue epistemology’s theory of knowledge. What emerges is a leaner theory of knowledge that is more empirically adequate, better captures the ordinary conception of knowledge, and is ripe for cross-fertilization with cognitive science. I call this view abilism. Along the way I identify several topics for future research.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Kenneth R. Westphal (ed.) (2009). The Blackwell Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This groundbreaking collective commentary on the whole of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, written by a select group of leading international scholars, peels back the layers of Hegel’s great work to reveal new insights into one of the most challenging works in the history of Western philosophy. By closely analyzing the original text, each essay illuminates the philosophical issues addressed in each section of Hegel’s work. By considering the role and function of each section of text within the Phenomenology as a (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Kenneth R. Westphal (2006). 'Science and the Philosophers'. In Pihlström & Vilkko Koskinen (ed.), Science: A Challenge to Philosophy? Pp. 125-152.
    The advent of distinctively Modern European philosophy at the turn of the seventeenth century was occasioned by two major developments: the painful recognition after thirty years of religious war that principles of public conduct must be justified independently of sectarian religious dogma; and the growth of natural science, especially discoveries in astronomy that linked terrestrial and celestial physics in a newly mathematicized, explanatory mechanics founded by Galileo and dramatically extended by Newton. The roles of reason and empirical evidence in inquiry, (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Kenneth R. Westphal (2004). ‘Must the Transcendental Conditions for the Possibility of Experience Be Ideal?’. In C. Ferrini (ed.), Eredità Kantiane (1804–2004): questioni emergenti e problemi irrisolti. Bibliopolis.
    Three genuinely transcendental conditions for the possibility of self-conscious experience are and can only be material (§§2–4). Identifying these conditions shows that the link between transcendental proof and transcendental idealism is not direct, but must be justified by substantive argument (§§ 4, 5). This illuminates the prospect of separating transcendental proofs from transcendental idealism. Indeed, examining these conditions reveals a powerful strategy for using transcendental proof to defend realism sans phrase. Strikingly, this prospect illuminates some otherwise occluded aspects of post-Kantian (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Kenneth R. Westphal (2003). ‘Can Pragmatic Realists Argue Transcendentally?’. In John Shook (ed.), Pragmatic Naturalism and Realism. Prometheus.
    Kant’s and Hegel’s transcendental argument for mental-content externalism breaks the deadlock between ‘internal’ and genuine realists. This argument shows that human beings can only be self-conscious in a world that provides a humanly recognizable regularity and variety among the things (or events) we sense. This feature of the world cannot result from human thought or language. Hence semantic arguments against realism can only be developed if realism about the world is true. Some of Putnam’s arguments for internal realism are taken (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Kenneth R. Westphal (1999). ‘Hegel’s Epistemology? Reflections on Some Recent Expositions’. Clio 28 (3):303-323.
    The notion that Hegel repudiated epistemology has had dire consequences for our understanding of Hegel. By disregarding epistemology, Hegel’s expositors often disregarded the general issues central to epistemology of how one can establish or justify a philosophical view. If Hegel did address epistemological issues and tried to justify (not simply to expound) ‘absolute knowledge’, then that disregard would produce skewed interpretations of Hegel. Recent attention to Hegel’s epistemology (e.g., by Klaus Hartmann, Joseph Flay, Robert Pippin, Michael Forster, Terry Pinkard, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kenneth R. Westphal (1998). Hegel's Solution to the Dilemma of the Criterion. In Jon Stewart (ed.), The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: A Collection of Critical and Interpretive Essays. SUNY. 173 - 188.
    [Revised version.] Contemporary epistemologists, including Chisholm, Moser, Alston and Fogelin, have over-simplified Pyrrhonian scepticism and in particular Sextus Empiricus’ Dilemma of the Criterion. I argue that the central methodological problem Hegel addresses in the Introduction to the Phenomenology of Spirit is the ‘Dilemma of the Criterion’, which purports to show that no criterion for distinguishing truth from falsehood can be established. I show that the Dilemma is especially pressing for any epistemology which, like Hegel’s, rejects ‘knowledge by acquaintance’, aims to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Causal Theory of Knowledge
  1. David B. Annis (1981). Swain's Causal Theory of Knowledge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):149-156.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Brian Besong (2014). The Prudent Conscience View. International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2):127-141.
    Moral intuitionism, which claims that some moral seemings are justification-conferring, has become an increasingly popular account in moral epistemology. Defenses of the position have largely focused on the standard account, according to which the justification-conferring power of a moral seeming is determined by its phenomenal credentials alone. Unfortunately, the standard account is a less plausible version of moral intuitionism because it does not take etiology seriously. In this paper, I provide an outline and defense of a non-standard account of moral (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. L. S. Carrier (1976). The Causal Theory of Knowledge. Philosophia 6 (2):237-257.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Christian Coseru (2009). Mind in Indian Buddhist Philosophy. In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Perhaps no other classical philosophical tradition, East or West, offers a more complex and counter-intuitive account of mind and mental phenomena than Buddhism. While Buddhists share with other Indian philosophers the view that the domain of the mental encompasses a set of interrelated faculties and processes, they do not associate mental phenomena with the activity of a substantial, independent, and enduring self or agent. Rather, Buddhist theories of mind center on the doctrine of no-self (Pāli anatta, Skt.[1] anātma), which postulates (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Francis W. Dauer (1980). Hume's Skeptical Solution and the Causal Theory of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 89 (3):357-378.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. D. Goldstick (1972). A Contribution Towards the Development of the Causal Theory of Knowledge. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):238-248.
    1 Cf. D. M. Armstrong, A Materialist Theory of Mind (London, 1968), Chapter 9; 'A Causal Theory of Knowledge' by Alvin I. Goldman, The Journal of Philosophy , Vol. LXIV, No. 12, June 22, 1967. A striking parallelism would appear to exist between 'the causal theory of knowledge' and the orthodox Stoic doctrine regarding the kataleptike phantasia . See, for example, Sextus Empiricus, Adversus Mathematicos 7.248 (reprinted in Stoicorum Veterum Fragmenta , edited by H. F. A. von Arnim, Leipzig, 1921, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. D. Goldstick (1972). A Contribution Towards the Development of the Causal Theory of Knowledge. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):238 – 248.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Wolfgang Grassl (1981). Knowing That One Knows and the Causal Theory of Knowledge. International Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):43-59.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. A. J. Holland (1977). Can Mannison Avoid a Causal Theory of Knowledge? Philosophical Quarterly 27 (107):158-161.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Christoph Jäger (2004). Skepticism, Information, and Closure: Dretske's Theory of Knowledge. Erkenntnis 61 (2-3):187 - 201.
    According to Fred Dretskes externalist theory of knowledge a subject knows that p if and only if she believes that p and this belief is caused or causally sustained by the information that p. Another famous feature of Dretskes epistemology is his denial that knowledge is closed under known logical entailment. I argue that, given Dretskes construal of information, he is in fact committed to the view that both information and knowledge are closed under known entailment. This has far-reaching consequences. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Mark Steiner (1973). Platonism and the Causal Theory of Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 70 (3):57-66.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Defeasibility Theory of Knowledge
  1. Avram Hiller (2013). Knowledge Essentially Based Upon False Belief. Logos and Episteme 4 (1):7-19.
    Richard Feldman and William Lycan have defended a view according to which a necessary condition for a doxastic agent to have knowledge is that the agent’s belief is not essentially based on any false assumptions. I call this the no-essential-false-assumption account, or NEFA. Peter Klein considers examples of what he calls “useful false beliefs” and alters his own account of knowledge in a way which can be seen as a refinement of NEFA. This paper shows that NEFA, even given Klein’s (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 133