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  1. B. A. (1982). Memory and Mind. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 35 (3):615-616.
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  2. Alia Al-Saji (2004). The Memory of Another Past: Bergson, Deleuze and a New Theory of Time. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 37 (2):203-239.
    Through the philosophies of Bergson and Deleuze, my paper explores a different theory of time. I reconstitute Deleuze’s paradoxes of the past in Difference and Repetition and Bergsonism to reveal a theory of time in which the relation between past and present is one of coexistence rather than succession. The theory of memory implied here is a non-representational one. To elaborate this theory, I ask: what is the role of the “virtual image” in Bergson’s Matter and Memory? Far from representing (...)
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  3. Martha Wagner Alibali & Kenneth R. Koedinger (1999). The Developmental Progression From Implicit to Explicit Knowledge: A Computational Approach. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):755-756.
    Dienes & Perner (D&P) argue that nondeclarative knowledge can take multiple forms. We provide empirical support for this from two related lines of research about the development of mathematical reasoning. We then describe how different forms of procedural and declarative knowledge can be effectively modeled in Anderson's ACT-R theory, contrasting this computational approach with D&P's logical approach. The computational approach suggests that the commonly observed developmental progression from more implicit to more explicit knowledge can be viewed as a consequence of (...)
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  4. Mengistu Amberber (ed.) (2007). The Language of Memory in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective. John Benjamins.
    ... volume explores the language of memory in a cross-linguistic perspective. The term memory is to be understood broadly as the "capacity to encode, store, ...
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  5. Norman H. Anderson (1997). Functional Memory Versus Reproductive Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):19-20.
    A functional theory of memory has already been developed as part of a general functional theory of cognition. The traditional conception of memory as “reproductive” touches on only a minor function. The primary function of memory is in constructing values for goal-directedness of everyday thought and action. This functional approach to memory rests on a solid empirical foundation.
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  6. Jackie Andrade (ed.) (2001). Working Memory in Perspective. Psychology Press.
    In this book, experienced researchers in the field address the question: Will the model survive these challenges?
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  7. Julia Annas (1992). Aristotle on Memory and the Self. In Martha Craven Nussbaum & Amélie Rorty (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press 297--311.
    This essay argues that Aristotle’s view of memory is more like that of the modern psychologist than that of a modern philosopher; he is more interested in accurately delineating different kinds of memory than in discussing philosophical problems of memory. The short treatise On Memory and Recollection is considered a treatise on memory and loosely associated phenomenon and recollection. It is suggested that this work is better regarded as a treatise on two kinds of memory.
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  8. Jose M. Arcaya (1991). Making Time for Memory: A Transcendental Approach. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):75-90.
    The storage view of memory is criticized by this paper. Given that this viewpoint assumes that memory emerges when such physical traces are electrically stimulated in the brain, the paper notes that this account gives no good philosophical account of how past events are able to arise from purely present brain activity. It argues that such an explanation of memory would make any contact with the real past impossible. Attributing the difficulties of the storage hypothesis to its underlying linear view (...)
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  9. Jose M. Arcaya (1989). Memory and Temporality: A Phenomenological Alternative. Philosophical Psychology 2 (1):101-110.
    The notion of memory storage, central to most contemporary theories of remembering, is challenged from a philosophical perspective as being contradictory and untenable. It criticizes this storage hypothesis as relying upon a linear explanation of time, an assumption which results in infinite regression, solipsism, and a failure to contact the real past. A model based on the phenomenological viewpoints of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty is offered as an alternative paradigm. Finally, a research method suggested by this descriptive approach to (...)
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  10. Aristotle, On Memory and Reminiscence.
  11. Aristotle, On Memory and Reminiscence.
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  12. Jay David Atlas, Qualia, Consciousness, and Memory: Dennett , Rosenthal , Ledoux , and Libet.
    In his recent book "Sweet Dreams: philosophical obstacles to a science of consciousness," Dennett renews his attack on a philosophical notion of qualia, the success of which attack is required if his brand of Functionalism is to survive. He also articulates once again what he takes to be essential to his notion of consciousness. I shall argue that his new, central argument against the philosophical concept of qualia fails. In passing I point out a difficulty that David Rosenthal's "higher-order thought" (...)
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  13. Siyaves Azeri (2013). Hume's Social Theory of Memory. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):53-68.
    Traditionally, Hume's account of memory is considered an individualist-atomic representational theory. However, textual evidence suggests that Hume's account is better seen as a first attempt to create a social theory of memory that considers social context, custom and habits, language, and logical structures as constitutive elements of memory.
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  14. Bernard J. Baars (1998). Attention, Self, and Conscious Self-Monitoring. In A Cognitive Theory of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press
    ?In everday language, the word ?attention? implies control of access to consciousness, and we adopt this usage here. Attention itself can be either voluntary or automatic. This can be readily modeled in the theory. Further, a contrastive analysis of spontaneously self?attributed vs. self?alien experiences suggests that ?self? can be interpreted as the more enduring, higher levels of the dominant context hierarchy, which create continuity over the changing flow of events. Since context is by definition unconscious in GW theory, self in (...)
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  15. Bernard J. Baars, Uma Ramamurthy & Stan Franklin (2007). How Deliberate, Spontaneous, and Unwanted Memories Emerge in a Computational Model of Consciousness. In John H. Mace (ed.), Involuntary Memory. New Perspectives in Cognitive Psychology. Blackwell Publishing 177-207.
  16. Annette C. Baier (1976). Mixing Memory and Desire. American Philosophical Quarterly 13 (July):213-20.
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  17. J. B. Baillie (1917). On the Nature of Memory-Knowledge. Mind 26 (103):249-272.
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  18. Thomas Baldwin (2010). Russell on Memory. Principia 5 (1-2):187-208.
    Russell famously propounded scepticism about memory in The Analysis of Mind (1921). As he there acknowledged, one way to counter this sceptical position is to hold that memory involves direct acquaintance with past, and this is in fact a thesis Russell had advanced in The Problems of Philosophy (1911). Indeed he had there used the case of memory to develop a sophisticated fallibilist, non-sceptical, epistemology. By 1921, however, Russell had rejected the early conception of memory as incompatible with the neutral (...)
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  19. Andrejs Balodis (2008). Revitalization of the Past. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 54:3-12.
    The concept of memory rests at the heart of Bersgon’s theory of consciousness. His theory of memory is the novelty in the history of philosophy. It is not an affirmation either of the metaphysical conceptions (versions à la Platonism) where “all knowledge is recollection”, nor of empiricist psychology possibly traceble back to Aristotle, where, briefly speaking, the faculty of memory depends on the general perceptual capacity. Contrary to the majority of the philosophical and psychological theories of his epoch, Bergson assigns (...)
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  20. David A. Balota, Patrick O. Dolan & Janet M. Duchek (2000). Memory Changes in Healthy Young and Older Adults. In Endel Tulving (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Memory. Oxford University Press 395--410.
    The present chapter provides a review of the literature addressing changes in memory performance in older adults (often retired individuals with an age between 60 and 80 years), compared to younger adults (often college students around age 20). While it is well-established that memory performance declines in older adults (e.g., Kausler, 1994; Ryan, 1992), it is now clear that not all aspects of memory are impaired (e.g., Balota & Duchek, 1988; Burke & Light, 1981; Craik, 1983; Schacter, Kihlstrom, Kaszniak & (...)
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  21. William P. Banks (1995). Implicit Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):369-370.
  22. Jeffrey Andrew Barash (2010). The Place of Remembrance: Reflections on Paul Ricoeur's Theory of Collective Memory. In Brian Treanor & Henry Isaac Venema (eds.), A Passion for the Possible: Thinking with Paul Ricoeur. Fordham University Press
  23. Jeffrey Andrew Barash (1997). The Sources of Memory. Journal of the History of Ideas 58 (4):707-717.
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  24. Amanda Barnier & John Sutton (2008). From Individual Memory to Collective Memory: Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives. Memory 16 (3):177-182.
    Very often our memories of the past are of experiences or events we shared with others. And ‘‘in many circumstances in society, remembering is a social event’’ (Roediger, Bergman, & Meade, 2000, p. 129): parents and children reminisce about significant family events, friends discuss a movie they just saw together, students study for exams with their roommates, colleagues remind one another of information relevant to an important group decision, and complete strangers discuss a crime they happened to witness together. Psychology (...)
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  25. Elaine S. Barry, Mary J. Naus & Lynn P. Rehm (2006). Depression, Implicit Memory, and Self: A Revised Memory Model of Emotion. Clinical Psychology Review 26:719-745.
    Cognitive constructs are explored for clinical psychologists interested in cognitive phenomena in depression. Both traditional and modern memory constructs are outlined and described with attention to their contribution to understanding depression. In particular, the notions of memory construction, self-schemas, and autobiographical memory (per [Conway, M.A. (2001). Sensory–perceptual episodic memory and its context: Autobiographical memory. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences, 356, 1375–1384.]) are discussed. Then, the phenomenon of implicit memory is described as a way to bring (...)
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  26. Renate Bartsch (2002). Consciousness Emerging: The Dynamics of Perception, Imagination, Action, Memory, Thought, and Language. John Benjamins.
  27. R. W. Beardsmore (1989). Autobiography and the Brain: Mary Warnock on Memory. British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (3):261-269.
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  28. Robert F. Belli (1986). Mechanist And Organicist Parallels Between Theories Of Memory And Science. Journal of Mind and Behavior 7 (1):63-86.
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  29. Aaron Ben-Zeev (1986). Two Approaches to Memory. Philosophical Investigations 9 (October):288-301.
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  30. B. S. Benjamin (1956). Remembering. Mind 65 (July):312-331.
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  31. Henri Bergson (1991). Matter and Memory. MIT Press.
    A monumental work by an important modern philosopher, Matter and Memory (1896) represents one of the great inquiries into perception and memory, movement and time, matter and mind. Nobel Prize-winner Henri Bergson surveys these independent but related spheres, exploring the connection of mind and body to individual freedom of choice. Bergson’s efforts to reconcile the facts of biology to a theory of consciousness offered a challenge to the mechanistic view of nature, and his original and innovative views exercised a profound (...)
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  32. Sven Bernecker (2011). Précis of Memory: A Philosophical Study. Philosophical Studies 153 (1):61-64.
  33. Sven Bernecker (2010). Russell on Mnemic Causation. Principia 5 (1-2):149-186.
    According to the standard view, the causal process connecting a past representation and its subsequent recall involves intermediary memory traces. Yet Bertrand Russell and Ludwig Wittgenstein held that since the physiological evidence for memory traces isn't quite conclusive, it is prudent to come up with an account of memory causation-referred to as nmemic causation—that manages without the stipulation of memory traces. Given mnemic causation, a past representation is directly causally active over a temporal distance. I argue that the stipulation of (...)
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  34. Sven Bernecker (2009). Memory: A Philosophical Study. OUP Oxford.
    Sven Bernecker presents a new causal theory of memory, examining a number of metaphysical and epistemological issues crucial to the understanding of propositional or factual memory. This book provides sophisticated and comprehensive coverage of a much neglected area of philosophy, and will also appeal to cognitive scientists and psychologists.
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  35. Sven Bernecker (2008). The Motivation of the Causal Theory of Memory. In The Metaphysics of Memory. Springer 17--29.
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  36. Sven Bernecker (2008). The Metaphysics of Memory. Springer.
    This book investigates central issues in the philosophy of memory. Does remembering require a causal process connecting the past representation to its subsequent recall and, if so, what is the nature of the causal process? Of what kind are the primary intentional objects of memory states? How do we know that our memory experiences portray things the way they happened in the past? Given that our memory is not only a passive device for reproducing thoughts but also an active device (...)
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  37. Sven Bernecker (2007). Remembering Without Knowing. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):137 – 156.
    This paper challenges the standard conception of memory as a form of knowledge. Unlike knowledge, memory implies neither belief nor justification.
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  38. Sven Bernecker (2004). Memory and Externalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):605-632.
    Content externalism about memory says that the individuation of memory contents depends on relations the subject bears to his past environment. I defend externalism about memory by arguing that neither philosophical nor psychological considerations stand in the way of accepting the context dependency of memory that follows from externalism.
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  39. Sven Bernecker & Kourken Michaelian (eds.) (2017). The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory. Routledge.
    Memory occupies a fundamental place in philosophy, playing a central role not only in the history of philosophy but also in philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics. Yet the philosophy of memory has only recently emerged as an area of study and research in its own right. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory is an outstanding reference source on the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting area, and is the first philosophical collection of its kind. The forty-eight (...)
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  40. Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton (2015). Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering. Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and interactional synchrony occurring at (...)
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  41. Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton (2015). Multiple Timescales of Joint Remembering in the Crafting of aMemory-Scaffolding Tool During Collaborative Design. In G. Airenti, B. G. Bara & G. Sandini (eds.), roceedings of EuroAsianPacific Joint Conference on Cognitive Science. 60-65.
    Joint remembering relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, linguistic, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales which we distinguish for analytic purposes with the terms ‘coordination’, ‘collaboration’, ‘cooperation’, and ‘culture’, so as better to study their interanimation in practice. As an illustrative example of the complementary timescales involved in joint remembering in a real-world activity, we present a (...)
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  42. Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton (2015). Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering. Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and interactional synchrony occurring at (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Ligon Bjork & Robert A. Bjork (1996). Continuing Influences of To-Be-Forgotten Information. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):176-196.
    In the present paper, we first argue that it is critical for humans to forget; that is, to have some means of preventing out-of-date information from interfering with the recall of current information. We then argue that the primary means of accomplishing such adaptive updating of human memory is retrieval inhibition: Information that is rendered out of date by new learning becomes less retrievable, but remains at essentially full strength in memory as indexed by other measures, such as recognition and (...)
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  44. David Bloch (2007). Aristotle on Memory and Recollection: Text, Translation, Interpretation, and Reception in Western Scholasticism. Brill.
    Based on a new critical edition of Aristotle's "De Memoria" and two interpretive essays, this book challenges current views on Aristotle's theories of memory ...
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  45. Aaron Bogart (2009). The Metaphysics of Memory, by Sven Bernecker. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):622 – 627.
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  46. Vernon J. Bourke (1941). Intellectual Memory in the Thomistic Theory of Knowledge. Modern Schoolman 18 (2):21-24.
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  47. Gordon H. Bower (1996). Reactivating a Reactivation Theory of Implicit Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):27-72.
    Implicit and explicit memory tasks are interpreted within a traditional memory theory that distinguishes associations between different classes of memory units . Associations from specific sensory features to logogens are strengthened by perceptual experiences, leading to specific perceptual priming. Associations among concepts are strengthened by use, leading to specific conceptual priming. Activating associations from concepts to logogens leads to semantic and associative priming. Item presentation also establishes a new association from it to a representation of the personal context, comprising an (...)
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  48. Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.) (2009). Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge.
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  49. Evander Bradley McGilvary (1933). Perceptual and Memory Perspectives. Journal of Philosophy 30 (12):309-330.
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  50. Francis H. Bradley (1899). Some Remarks on Memory and Inference. Mind 8 (30):145-166.
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