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  1. Ralf Kaptijn & Fleur Thomese (2010). Fitness Effects of Grandparental Investments in Contemporary Low-Risk Societies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):29-30.
    Coall & Hertwig (C&H) suggest that, because grandparental investments do not impact on child mortality in low-risk societies, fitness effects are not plausible any more. We found that grandparental investments could very well alleviate contemporary constraints on fertility. Cultural factors may influence both the occurrence and impact of grandparental investments.
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  2. Rajesh Kasturirangan, Nirmalya Guha & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in the Indian (...)
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  3. Frank C. Keil (2010). The Feasibility of Folk Science. Cognitive Science 34 (5):826-862.
    If folk science means individuals having well worked out mechanistic theories of the workings of the world, then it is not feasible. Laypeople’s explanatory understandings are remarkably coarse, full of gaps, and often full of inconsistencies. Even worse, most people overestimate their own understandings. Yet recent views suggest that formal scientists may not be so different. In spite of these limitations, science somehow works and its success offers hope for the feasibility of folk science as well. The success of science (...)
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  4. Geert Keil (2000). Naturalismus und Intentionalität. In Geert Keil & Herbert Schnädelbach (eds.), Naturalismus. Suhrkamp 187-204.
    Naturalism in theoretical philosophy comes in three kinds: metaphysical, scientific and semantical. Metaphysical naturalism holds that only natural things exist, scientific (or methodological) naturalism holds that the methods of natural science provide the only avenue to truth, semantic (or analytic) naturalism tries to provide sufficient nonintentional conditions for intentional phenomena. The paper argues that analytic naturalism does not render metaphysical or scientific naturalism obsolete, but can be understood as a further step in elaborating upon these programmes. The intentional idiom of (...)
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  5. Kathryn A. Kerns (2009). Developmental Transformations in Attachment in Middle Childhood. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):33-34.
    The target article proposes a model to explain the emergence of sex differences in attachment in middle childhood and their implications for reproductive strategies. While biological factors are prominent in the model, little is said about the social context of middle childhood and its contributions. There is also a need to clarify the fundamental nature of attachment in middle childhood.
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  6. Boaz Keysar, Shuhong Lin & Dale J. Barr (2003). Limits on Theory of Mind Use in Adults. Cognition 89 (1):25-41.
  7. Melanie Killen, Kelly Lynn Mulvey, Cameron Richardson, Noah Jampol & Amanda Woodward (2011). The Accidental Transgressor: Morally-Relevant Theory of Mind. Cognition 119 (2):197-215.
  8. Michael David Kirchhoff (2012). Extended Cognition and Fixed Properties: Steps to a Third-Wave Version of Extended Cognition. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):287-308.
    This paper explores several paths a distinctive third wave of extended cognition might take. In so doing, I address a couple of shortcomings of first- and second-wave extended cognition associated with a tendency to conceive of the properties of internal and external processes as fixed and non-interchangeable. First, in the domain of cognitive transformation, I argue that a problematic tendency of the complementarity model is that it presupposes that socio-cultural resources augment but do not significantly transform the brain’s representational capacities (...)
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  9. Mikhail Kissine (2012). Pragmatics, Cognitive Flexibility and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Mind and Language 27 (1):1-28.
    Pragmatic deficits of persons with autism spectrum disorders [ASDs] are often traced back to a dysfunction in Theory of Mind. However, the exact nature of the link between pragmatics and mindreading in autism is unclear. Pragmatic deficits in ASDs are not homogenous: in particular, while inter-subjective dimensions are affected, some other pragmatic capacities seem to be relatively preserved. Moreover, failure on classical false-belief tasks stems from executive problems that go beyond belief attribution; false-belief tasks require taking an alternative perspective on (...)
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  10. D. Knight (1997). A Poetics of Psychological Explanation. Metaphilosophy 28 (1-2):63-80.
  11. Gary Kose & Gary Fireman (2000). Postmodern Readings of Piaget's Genetic Epistemology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):52-60.
    This paper examines several contemporary readings of Piaget's texts: M. Chapman's Constructive Evolution provides a wide-ranging exegesis of Piaget's entire body of work; F. Vidal's Piaget before Piaget focuses on Piaget's earliest writings; and H. Beilin's Piaget's New Theory concentrates on Piaget's very last projects. All three contend that in contrast to accepted versions of Piaget's theory, there is a relatively unknown Piaget and a markedly differently way to understand Genetic Epistemology. This brief review attempts to bracket such readings within (...)
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  12. Anton Kühberger, Christoph Kogler, H. U. G. Angelika & Evelyne Mösl (2006). The Role of the Position Effect in Theory and Simulation. Mind and Language 21 (5):610–625.
    We contribute to the empirical debate on whether we understand and predict mental states by using simulation (simulation theory) or by relying on a folk psychological theory (theory theory). To decide between these two fundamental positions, it has been argued that failure to predict other people's choices would be challenging evidence against the simulation view. We test the specific claim that people prefer the rightmost position in choosing among equally valued objects, and whether or not this position bias can be (...)
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  13. R. Langdon & M. Coltheart (1999). Mentalising, Schizotypy, and Schizophrenia. Cognition 71 (1):43-71.
  14. Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart (2001). Visual Perspective-Taking and Schizotypy: Evidence for a Simulation-Based Account of Mentalizing in Normal Adults. Cognition 82 (1):1-26.
  15. K. Lawrence, A. Jones, L. Oreland, D. Spektor, W. Mandy, R. Campbell & D. Skuse (2007). The Development of Mental State Attributions in Women with X-Monosomy, and the Role of Monoamine Oxidase B in the Sociocognitive Phenotype. Cognition 102 (1):84-100.
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  16. W. L. Lee (2005). Bertram F. Malle, How the Mind Explains Behavior: Folk Explanations, Meaning, and Social Interaction. Philosophy in Review 25 (4):276-278.
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  17. Susan R. Leekam & Josef Perner (1991). Does the Autistic Child Have a Metarepresentational Deficit? Cognition 40 (3):203-218.
  18. J. F. Leiber (1985). From Folk Psychology to Cognitive Science. Review of Metaphysics 38 (4):907-908.
  19. Alan M. Leslie (1994). Pretending and Believing: Issues in the Theory of ToMM. Cognition 50 (1-3):211-238.
  20. Alan M. Leslie & Uta Frith (1987). Metarepresentation and Autism: How Not to Lose One's Marbles. Cognition 27 (3):291-294.
  21. Alan M. Leslie, Shaun Nichols, Stephen P. Stich & David B. Klein (1996). Varieties of Off-Line Simulation. In P. Carruthers & P. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press 39-74.
    In the last few years, off-line simulation has become an increasingly important alternative to standard explanations in cognitive science. The contemporary debate began with Gordon (1986) and Goldman's (1989) off-line simulation account of our capacity to predict behavior. On their view, in predicting people's behavior we take our own decision making system `off line' and supply it with the `pretend' beliefs and desires of the person whose behavior we are trying to predict; we then let the decision maker reach a (...)
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  22. Alan M. Leslie & Laila Thaiss (1992). Domain Specificity in Conceptual Development: Neuropsychological Evidence From Autism. Cognition 43 (3):225-251.
  23. Ivan Leudar & Alan Costall (eds.) (2009). Against Theory of Mind. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  24. Angeline Lillard (1998). The Source of Universal Concepts: A View From Folk Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):580-580.
    The evidence Atran uses to support innate biological principles could just as well support learning, just as in another realm often cited as a candidate for innate knowledge, “naive psychology.”.
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  25. Evan J. Livesey & Justin A. Harris (2009). Is There Room for Simple Links in a Propositional Mind? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):212-213.
    Against Mitchell et al.'s assertions, we argue that (1) the concordance between learning and awareness does not support any particular learning theory, (2) their propositional approach is at odds with examples of learned behaviours that contradict beliefs about causation, and (3) the relative virtues of the two approaches in terms of parsimony is more ambiguous than Mitchell et al. suggest.
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  26. David Lumsden (2013). Defending the Middle Ground in Narrative Theory and the Self. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):29-31.
    I am grateful for the responses from Serife Tekin and James Phillips to my paper (Lumsden 2013), for they allow me to clarify my position. Tekin (2013) accurately characterizes me as attempting to salvage the value of narrative theory without accepting the more stringent demands that have been required or implied, notably the necessity for personhood of a whole life narrative. She notes that I attempt to provide an alternative view of the unity of a person, to the degree that (...)
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  27. Yuyan Luo (2011). Do 10-Month-Old Infants Understand Others’ False Beliefs? Cognition 121 (3):289-298.
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  28. Robert Lurz (2009). If Chimpanzees Are Mindreaders, Could Behavioral Science Tell? Toward a Solution of the Logical Problem. Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):305-328.
    There is a persistent methodological problem in primate mindreading research, dubbed the 'logical problem,' over how to determine experimentally whether chimpanzees are mindreaders or just clever behavior-readers of a certain sort. The problem has persisted long enough that some researchers have concluded that it is intractable. The logical problem, I argue, is tractable but only with experimental protocols that are fundamentally different from those that have been currently used or suggested. In the first section, I describe what the logical problem (...)
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  29. Wendy Lynne Lee (2005). Bertram F. Malle, How the Mind Explains Behavior: Folk Explanations, Meaning, and Social Interaction Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (4):276-278.
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  30. Derek E. Lyons & Laurie R. Santos (2006). Ecology, Domain Specificity, and the Origins of Theory of Mind: Is Competition the Catalyst? Philosophy Compass 1 (5):481–492.
  31. Jack Lyons (1997). Testimony, Induction and Folk Psychology. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (2):163 – 178.
  32. Cynthia Macdonald (1993). The Future of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Books 34 (2):114-116.
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  33. Heidi L. Maibom (2000). Tacit Knowledge and Folk Psychology. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 35:95.
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  34. Valerie Malhotra Bentz, William Hamrick & Mary Beth Morrissey (2010). Hisashi Nasu, Lester Embree, George Psathas, and Ilja Srubar (Eds.), Alfred Schutz and His Intellectual Partners; Sandra P. Thomas and Howard R. Pollio, Listening to Patients, A Phenomenological Approach to Nursing Research and Practice; Matthew Ratcliffe, Rethinking Commonsense Psychology: A Critique of Folk Psychology, Theory of Mind and Simulation. [REVIEW] Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 2:204-226.
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  35. Bertram Malle, Attributions as Behavior Explanations: Toward a New Theory.
    Attribution theory has played a major role in social-psychological research. Unfortunately, the term attribution is ambiguous. According to one meaning, forming an attribution is making a dispositional (trait) inference from behavior; according to another meaning, forming an attribution is giving an explanation (especially of behavior). The focus of this paper is on the latter phenomenon of behavior explanations. In particular, I discuss a new theory of explanation that provides an alternative to classic attribution theory as it dominates the textbooks and (...)
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  36. Bertram F. Malle (2005). Three Puzzles of Mindreading. In B. Malle & S. Hodges (eds.), Other Minds. Guilford Press 26--43.
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  37. Bertram F. Malle (2003). Folk Theory of Mind: Conceptual Foundations of Social Cognition. In [Book Chapter] (in Press).
    The human ability to represent, conceptualize, and reason about mind and behavior is one of the greatest achievements of human evolution and is made possible by a “folk theory of mind” — a sophisticated conceptual framework that relates different mental states to each other and connects them to behavior. This chapter examines the nature and elements of this framework and its central functions for social cognition. As a conceptual framework, the folk theory of mind operates prior to any particular conscious (...)
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  38. George Mandler (2009). Propositional Encodings Are a Subset of Organization Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):214-215.
    The notion that human associative learning is a usually conscious, higher-order process is one of the tenets of organization theory, developed over the past century. Propositional/sequential encoding is one of the possible types of organizational structures, but learning may also involve other structures.
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  39. Ausonio Marras (2004). Commonsense Refutations of Eliminativism. In Christina E. Erneling (ed.), The Mind as a Scientific Object: Between Brain and Culture. Oxford University Press 206.
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  40. Alia Martin & Laurie R. Santos (2014). The Origins of Belief Representation: Monkeys Fail to Automatically Represent Others’ Beliefs. Cognition 130 (3):300-308.
  41. Raymond J. McCall (1949). Relation Between Philosophical and Scientific Psychology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 23:144-148.
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  42. James McClenon (1993). The Experiential Foundations of Shamanic Healing. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (2):107-127.
    An experience-centered approach reveals empirical foundations for shamanic healing. This article is based on data derived from surveys of Chinese, Japanese, Caucasian-American, and African-American populations and participant observation of over thirty Asian shamans. Respondents reported anomalous events such as apparitions, extrasensory perceptions, contact with the dead, precognitive dreams, clairvoyance, and out-of-body experiences. Based on folk reasoning, these episodes support belief in spirits, souls, and life after death. Shamanic healers have a far greater propensity to experience anomalous events than general populations (...)
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  43. M. C. McKinnon & M. Moscovitch (2007). Domain-General Contributions to Social Reasoning: Theory of Mind and Deontic Reasoning Re-Explored. Cognition 102 (2):179-218.
  44. Mark Mercer (2007). Folk Psychology's Epistemic Credentials. Facta Philosophica 9 (1):37-53.
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  45. Gerben Meynen (2013). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Free Will, and Control. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (4):323-332.
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is considered to be one of the more common serious mental disorders, with a prevalence rate of about 1% (Heyman et al. 2006). It is characterized by obsessions, or compulsions, or both. According to the DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association 1994), obsessions are “recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced at some time during the disturbance, as intrusive and inappropriate and that cause marked anxiety or distress.” Compulsions, on the other hand, are repetitive behaviors (e.g., (...)
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  46. Ruth G. Millikan (2005). Some Reflections on the Theory Theory - Simulation Theory Discussion. In Susan Hurley & Nick Chater (eds.), Perspectives on Imitation: From Mirror Neurons to Memes, Vol II. MIT Press
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  47. Stephen Mills (2001). The Idea of Different Folk Psychologies. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (4):501 – 519.
    The idea of different folk psychologies is the idea that among the world's cultures there are those whose folk, or commonsense, psychologies differ in theoretically significant ways from each other and from western folk psychology. This challenges the claim that folk psychology is a 'cultural universal'. The paper looks first of all at what are called 'opulent' accounts of folk psychology, which employ a wide-ranging and more complex set of psychological concepts, and 'core' accounts, which employ a much more restricted (...)
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  48. Peter Mitchell & Laura M. Taylor (1999). Shape Constancy and Theory of Mind: Is There a Link? Cognition 70 (2):167-190.
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  49. Richard Montgomery (1987). Psychologism, Folk Psychology and One's Own Case. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 17 (2):195–218.
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  50. R. P. Moon (1996). Common Sense and Psychology.
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