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Therapeutic Cloning

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
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  1. L. Bernier (2004). Reproductive and Therapeutic Cloning, Germline Therapy, and Purchase of Gametes and Embryos: Comments on Canadian Legislation Governing Reproduction Technologies. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):527-532.
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  2. Russell Blackford (2007). Slippery Slopes to Slippery Slopes: Therapeutic Cloning and the Criminal Law. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (2):63-64.
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  3. Andrea Bonnicksen (2007). Pt. V. Reproduction and Cloning. Abortion Revisited / Don Marquis ; Moral Status, Moral Value, and Human Embryos: Implications for Stem Cell Research / Bonnie Steinbock ; Therapeutic Cloning: Politics and Policy. [REVIEW] In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Alistair Brown (2010). Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation. Part I: Arguments For and Against & Regulations. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):75-86.
    In analysing the position adopted by the United Kingdom over therapeutic cloning, this paper will endeavour to examine the question of regulation, its necessity and extent. This will be achieved through considering different models of relevant theoretical discourse before, in applying that discourse to identified systems of regulation, the advantages and pitfalls of each system will be assessed in the hope of reaching a solution appropriate to the sensitive, yet dynamic, needs of the issue.
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  5. Alistair Brown (2010). Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation - Part II: Analysing the UK Position. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):60-73.
    It will be remembered that the introductory chapter to this paper differentiated between human therapeutic cloning and embryonic stem cell research, with the former concept encapsulating the latter one. In turning to examine the current system of regulation found within the United Kingdom this has particular relevance as it is only the practice of therapeutic cloning – the creation and use of an embryo – which engages with the regulative measures adopted.
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  6. S. Camporesi & L. Bortolotti (2008). Reproductive Cloning in Humans and Therapeutic Cloning in Primates: Is the Ethical Debate Catching Up with the Recent Scientific Advances? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e15-e15.
    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved so (...)
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  7. Marilyn E. Coors (2002). Therapeutic Cloning: From Consequences to Contradiction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):297 – 317.
    The British Parliament legalized therapeutic cloning in December 2000 despite opposition from the European Union. The watershed event in Parliament's move was the active and unprecedented government support for the generation and destruction of human embryonic life merely as a means of medical advancement. This article contends that the utilitarian analysis of this procedure is necessary to identify the real world risks of therapeutic cloning but insufficient to identify the breach of defensible ethical limits that this procedure represents. A value-oriented (...)
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  8. Hossam E. Fadel (2012). Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review. Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human embryonic (...)
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  9. H. Fangerau (2005). Can Artificial Parthenogenesis Sidestep Ethical Pitfalls in Human Therapeutic Cloning? An Historical Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (12):733-735.
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  10. J.-E. S. Hansen (2002). Embryonic Stem Cell Production Through Therapeutic Cloning has Fewer Ethical Problems Than Stem Cell Harvest From Surplus IVF Embryos. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):86-88.
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  11. Daniel Holbrook (2007). All Embryos Are Equal?: Issues in Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis, IVF Implantation, Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and Therapeutic Cloning. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):43-53.
    The focus here is the question of the moral status of viable human embryos for the first few days of their existence. More precisely, my focus is the human embryo from its conception, through its becoming a mass of undifferentiated cells, to its first differentiation when the initial stem cell mass appears. Naturally, this would occur in the first week of the embryo’s existence, whether in vitro (in a laboratory) or in vivo (in the uterine tubes or uterus). With cryogenics, (...)
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  12. E. Jensen (2008). Through Thick and Thin: Rationalizing the Public Bioethical Debate Over Therapeutic Cloning. Clinical Ethics 3 (4):194-198.
    Beauchamp and Childress (1994) elaborated an approach to bioethical deliberations based on four universalistic principles. This framework of ‘principlism’ has been criticized from within biomedical ethics as insufficient and problematic. However, this article considers a more radical sociological critique by John Evans (2002) that rejects the entire approach of defining ‘principles’ a priori. This sociological critique is based on classical sociologist Max Weber's (1925) distinction between instrumental (‘thin’) and substantive (‘thick’) rationality. As an exploratory assessment of Evans' critique, his conceptualization (...)
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  13. Gerard Magill (2006). Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Human Therapeutic Cloning : Maintaining the Ethical Tension Between Respect and Research. In Ana Smith Iltis (ed.), Research Ethics. Routledge.
  14. Mary B. Mahowald (2004). Self-Preservation: An Argument for Therapeutic Cloning, and a Strategy for Fostering Respect for Moral Integrity. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):56-66.
    The issues of human cloning and stem cell retrieval are inseparable in circumstances in which the rationale of self-preservation may be invoked as a negative right. I apply this rationale to a hypothetical case in which cloning is necessary to preserve the bodily integrity or life of an individual. Self-preservation as moral integrity is examined in a narrower context, i.e., as applicable to those for whom deliberate termination of embryonic life is morally-problematic. This issue is addressed through comparison with two (...)
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  15. Azevedo Marco Antonio (2013). Human Enhancement: A New Issue in Philosophical Agenda. Princípios 20 (33):265-304.
    Since before we can remember, humanity aims to overcome its biological limitations; such a goal has certainly played a key role in the advent of technique. However, despite the benefits that technique may bring, the people who make use of it will inevitably be under risk of harm. Even though human technical wisdom consists in attaining the best result without compromising anybody’s safety, misuses are always a possibility in the horizon. Nowadays, technology can be used for more than just improving (...)
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  16. Jerzy Pelc (2007). Human Cloning and Organ Transplants Vs. Definition of Human Being. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:235-244.
    In bioethical discussions of human cloning there are sometimes employed definitions broadening the denotation of the term human being to include also, on an equal footing, human embryos. Also, the fact of being human is being equated with being a person. Consequently, embryos are treated as having dignity and calls are heard in the name of justice to protect the rights and interests of embryos whenever these clash with the interests of mature human beings. The author, being a layman in (...)
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  17. Robert Sparrow (2009). Therapeutic Cloning and Reproductive Liberty. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (2):1-17.
    Concern for “reproductive liberty” suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning (...)
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  18. M. Spriggs (2003). Therapeutic Cloning Research and Ethical Oversight. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):207-208.
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  19. Fredrik Svenaeus (2007). A Heideggerian Defense of Therapeutic Cloning. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (1):31-62.
    Debates about the legitimacy of embryonic stem-cell research have largely focused on the type of ethical value that should be accorded to the human embryo in␣vitro. In this paper, I try to show that, to broaden the scope of these debates, one needs to articulate an ontology that does not limit itself to biological accounts, but that instead focuses on the embryo’s place in a totality of relevance surrounding and guiding a human practice. Instead of attempting to substantiate the ethical (...)
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