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  1. Barbara Abbott (1995). Thinking Without English. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):49 - 55.
    Abbott replies to each of Hauser's arguments. Problem solving by chimpanzees and evidence of recursion in the thought of a feral human being suggest that natural language is not necessary for productive thought. Communication would be trivial if the inner language were the outer language, but it is not. The decryption analogy Hauser uses is flawed, and it is not clear which way Occam's razor cuts.
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  2. Paulo Abrantes (2010). Philosophy of Mind. J. Kim [Resenha]. Principia 1 (2):312-325.
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  3. Ira Altman (1997). The Concept of Intelligence: A Philosophical Analysis. University Press of America.
    This book is about the concept of intelligence which derives virtually all of its significance from an occurrence use of mental conduct adverbs. The Concept of Intelligence provides an episodic rather than a dispositional analysis, while at the same time, agreeing that intelligence has 'outer criteria' of meaning. It reinforces the 'nature' as opposed to the 'nurture' side of the popular debate on intelligence by showing what the concept signifies in ordinary language, and so, dovetails with the controversial 'The Bell (...)
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  4. Santiago Arango-Muñoz (2014). The Nature of Epistemic Feelings. Philosophical Psychology 27 (2):1-19.
    Among the phenomena that make up the mind, cognitive psychologists and philosophers have postulated a puzzling one that they have called ?epistemic feelings.? This paper aims to (1) characterize these experiences according to their intentional content and phenomenal character, and (2) describe the nature of these mental states as nonconceptual in the cases of animals and infants, and as conceptual mental states in the case of adult human beings. Finally, (3) the paper will contrast three accounts of the causes and (...)
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  5. Jonathan Baron (1990). Thinking About Consequences. Journal of Moral Education 19 (2):77-87.
    Abstract Critical thinking about moral decisions considers the consequences of options for the achievement of people's goals. Attempts to think critically lead to error and bias, so intuitive rules are needed to guard against these errors and to save time. Intuitive rules, however, lead to errors and biases of their own. I propose that students be taught to approximate critical thinking itself and that they learn rules of thumb to guard against its pitfalls. In particular, students need to learn certain (...)
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  6. Guillaume Beaulac (2014). Language, Mind, and Cognitive Science: Remarks on Theories of the Language-Cognition Relationships in Human Minds. Dissertation, University of Western Ontario
    My dissertation establishes the basis for a systematic outlook on the role language plays in human cognition. It is an investigation based on a cognitive conception of language, as opposed to communicative conceptions, viz. those that suppose that language plays no role in cognition. I focus, in Chapter 2, on three paradigmatic theories adopting this perspective, each offering different views on how language contributes to or changes cognition. -/- In Chapter 3, I criticize current views held by dual-process theorists, and (...)
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  7. H. A. Bedau (1957). Book Review:On Human Thinking K. W. Monsarrat. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 24 (1):91-.
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  8. José Luis Bermúdez (2007). Negation, Contrariety, and Practical Reasoning: Comments on Millikan's Varieties of Meaning. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):663–669.
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  9. John D. Bishop (1980). The Analogy Theory of Thinking. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (September):222-238.
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  10. David M. Brahinsky (1982). Making and Thinking. International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2):99-101.
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  11. Tim Crane (2008). Sainsbury on Thinking About an Object (Sainsbury Sobre Pensar Acerca de Un Objeto). Critica 40 (120):85 - 95.
    R.M. Sainsbury's account of reference has many compelling and attractive features. But it has the undesirable consequence that sentences of the form "x is thinking about y" can never be true when y is replaced by a non-referring term. Of the two obvious ways to deal with this problem within Sainsbury's framework, I reject one (the analysis of thinking about as a propositional attitude) and endorse the other (treating "thinks about" as akin to an intensional transitive verb). This endorsement is (...)
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  12. Gregory Currie (1985). The Analysis of Thoughts. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (3):283 – 298.
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  13. John Divers & Alexander Miller (1994). Best Opinion, Intention-Detecting and Analytic Functionalism. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):239-245.
  14. Andreas Elpidorou (2012). Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):145-160.
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
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  15. Christopher Gauker (2007). On the Alleged Priority of Thought Over Language. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press 125.
    It is obvious that there are kinds of cognition -- mental problem solving -- that do not require spoken language. But it should not be obvious that peculiarly conceptual thought is independent of spoken language. This paper is a critical survey of arguments concluding that conceptual thought must be independent of language. The special emphasis is on arguments that John Searle has put forward, but others are considered as well. These include the claim that only the intentionality of thought is (...)
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  16. Liran Shia Gordon (2016). Some Thoughts About Aquinas's Conception of Truth as Adequation. Heythrop Journal 57 (2):325-336.
    While Aquinas’s primary notion of truth as adequation is applied to God and man in somewhat different ways, it is apparent that it is not applicable to the angels, at least not in the same way. However, since truth is a transcendental, and as transcendentals are convertible, one may claim that the transcendental systems that apply to various beings differ. In order to consolidate the universality of the transcendental system, the study aims to show the manner truth as adequation can (...)
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  17. Justus Hartnack (1972). On Thinking. Mind 81 (October):543-552.
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  18. Ulf Hlobil (2015). Anti-Normativism Evaluated. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (3):376-395.
    I argue that recent attempts to show that meaning and content are not normative fail. The two most important arguments anti-normativists have presented are what I call the ‘argument from constitution’ and the ‘argument from guidance’. Both of these arguments suffer from the same basic problem: they overlook the possibility of focusing on assessability by norms, rather than compliance with norms or guidance by norms. Moreover, I argue that the anti-normativists arguments fail even if we ignore this basic problem. Thus, (...)
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  19. Christopher Hookway (1997). Analyticity, Linguistic Rules and Epistemic Evaluation. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 42:197-.
  20. Walter Hopp (2010). How to Think About Nonconceptual Content. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):1-24.
    This paper provides a general account of what nonconceptual content is, and some considerations in favor of its existence. After distinguishing between the contents and objects of mental states, as well as the properties of being conceptual and being conceptualized, I argue that what is phenomenologically distinctive about conceptual content is that it is not determined by, and does not determine, the intuitive character of an experience. That is, for virtually any experience E with intuitive character I, there is no (...)
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  21. W. E. Johnson (1918). Analysis of Thinking (I). Mind 27 (105):1-21.
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  22. K. (1995). Some Varieties of Thinking: Reflections on Meinong and Fodor. Grazer Philosophische Studien 50:365-395.
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  23. David Kirsh (2013). Embodied Cognition and the Magical Future of Interaction Design. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 20 (1):30.
    The theory of embodied cognition can provide HCI practitioners and theorists with new ideas about interac-tion and new principles for better designs. I support this claim with four ideas about cognition: (1) interacting with tools changes the way we think and perceive – tools, when manipulated, are soon absorbed into the body schema, and this absorption leads to fundamental changes in the way we perceive and conceive of our environments; (2) we think with our bodies not just (...)
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  24. David Kirsh (2012). Running It Through the Body. Proceedings of the 34th Annual Cognitive Science Society 34:593-598.
    Video data from three large captures of choreographic dance making was analyzed to determine if there is a difference between participant knowledge – the knowledge an agent acquires by being the cause of an action – and observer knowledge – the knowledge an observer acquires through close attention to someone else’s performance. The idea that there might be no difference has been challenged by recent findings about the action observation network and tacitly challenged by certain tenets in enactive perception. We (...)
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  25. David Kirsh (2011). Creative Cognition in Choreography. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Computational Creativity:1-6.
    Contemporary choreography offers a window onto creative processes that rely on harnessing the power of sensory sys- tems. Dancers use their body as a thing to think with and their sensory systems as engines to simulate ideas non- propositionally. We report here on an initial analysis of data collected in a lengthy ethnographic study of the making of a dance by a major choreographer and show how translating between different sensory modalities can help dancers and choreographer to be more creative.
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  26. David Kirsh (2010). Thinking With External Representations. AI and Society 25 (4):441-454.
    Why do people create extra representations to help them make sense of situations, diagrams, illustrations, instructions and problems? The obvious explanation— external representations save internal memory and com- putation—is only part of the story. I discuss seven ways external representations enhance cognitive power: they change the cost structure of the inferential landscape; they provide a structure that can serve as a shareable object of thought; they create persistent referents; they facilitate re- representation; they are often a more natural representation of (...)
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  27. H. E. L. (1956). On Human Thinking. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):180-180.
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  28. A. R. Lacey (1963). Thoughts and the Sui Generis. Mind 72 (January):129-132.
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  29. Hemdat Lerman (2015). The Intellectual Powers: A Study of Human Nature, by P. M. S. Hacker. [REVIEW] Mind 124 (496):1278-1285.
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  30. Peter Lewis & Andrew Harrison (1979). Making and Thinking: A Study of Intelligent Activities. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (117):362.
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  31. Douglas C. Long (1961). Second Thoughts: A Reply to Mr Ginnane's Thoughts. Mind 70 (July):405-411.
  32. William E. Lyons (1979). Ryle's Three Accounts of Thinking. International Philosophical Quarterly 19 (December):443-450.
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  33. Richard E. Mayer & Russell Revlin (1978). An Information Processing Framework for Research on Human Reasoning. In Russell Revlin & Richard E. Mayer (eds.), Human Reasoning. Distributed Solely by Halsted Press
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  34. Bernard Mayo (1980). Making and Thinking: A Study of Intelligent Activities By Andrew Harrison Hassocks: Harvester Press, 1978, 207 Pp., £11.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 55 (211):128-.
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  35. Bernard Mayo (1980). HARRISON, ANDREW "Making and Thinking: A Study of Intelligent Activities". [REVIEW] Philosophy 55:128.
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  36. Friederike Moltmann, Attitudinal Objects and the Distinction Between Actions and Products.
    This paper explores a notion of a truth-bearing entity that is distinct both from a proposition and from an intentional event, state, or action, namely the notion of an attitudinal object. Attitudinal objects are entities like ‘John’s belief that S’, John’s claim that S’, ‘John’s desire that S’, or ‘John’s request that S’. The notion of an attitudinal object has an important precedent in the work of the Polish philosopher Twardowski (1912), who drew a more general distinction between ‘actions’ and (...)
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  37. Keith W. Monsarrat (1955). On Human Thinking. London,: Methuen.
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  38. Julius Moravcsik (1983). Can There Be a Science of Thought? Conceptus: Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie 17 (40-41):239-262.
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  39. David L. Mouton (1969). The Concept of Thinking. Noûs 3 (November):355-372.
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  40. H. H. Price (1946/1975). Thinking and Representation. Haskell House.
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  41. Joan W. Reeves (1965). Thinking About Thinking. New York: Braziller.
    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the following: Professor DW Harding for suggesting inquiry into Binet's work and for allowing use of his own ideas in ...
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  42. John M. Russell (1980). How to Think About Thinking. Journal of Mind and Behavior 1 (1):45-62.
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  43. R. A. Sharpe (1980). "Making and Thinking. A Study of Intelligent Activities": Andrew Harrison. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (2):185.
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  44. Ludovic Soutif (2012). De Re Thought, Object Identity, and Knowing-Wh*. Analytica 16 (1-2):133-164.
    In this paper, I discuss a view of de re thoughts that can be naturally endorsed in the wake of Russell's account. This is the view that a thought is about the very thing (res) rather than a mere characterization of it if and only if it is constitutively tied, if not to the existence, at least to the identity of its object and the thinker knows which/who the object of his/her thought is. Faced with the challenge of accommodating far (...)
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  45. Isidora Stojanovic & Neftalí Villanueva Fernández (2015). Mental Files, Blown Up by Indexed Files. Inquiry 58 (4):393-407.
    Mental Files, Blown Up by Indexed Files. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/0020174X.2014.883746.
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  46. Dustin Stokes (2007). Incubated Cognition and Creativity. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (3):83-100.
    Many traditional theories of creativity put heavy emphasis on an incubation stage in creative cognitive processes. The basic phenomenon is a familiar one: we are working on a task or problem, we leave it aside for some period of time, and when we return attention to the task we have some new insight that services completion of the task. This feature, combined with other ostensibly mysterious features of creativity, has discouraged naturalists from theorizing creativity. This avoidance is misguided: we can (...)
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  47. Roger J. Sullivan (1984). Making and Thinking. Review of Metaphysics 37 (3):635-637.
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  48. Richard Swinburne (1985). Thought. Philosophical Studies 48 (September):153-172.
    AN OCCURRENT THOUGHT IS DISTINGUISHED FROM BELIEF, INTELLIGENT BEHAVIOR, AND THE ACTIVE PROCESS OF THINKING. THE OCCURRENCE OF THOUGHTS IS NOT TO BE ANALYZED IN TERMS OF THE OCCURRENCE OF IMAGES OF WORDS OF SENTENCES WHICH EXPRESS THEM AND OFTEN ACCOMPANY THEM. THOUGHTS HAVE INBUILT INTENTIONALITY.
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  49. Daniel M. Taylor (1956). Thinking. Mind 65 (April):246-251.
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  50. Paul Trainor (1980). Making and Thinking: A Study of Intelligent Activities. By Andrew Harrison. Modern Schoolman 57 (2):179-180.
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