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  1. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1950). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the First Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  2. Anjan Chatterjee Adam J. Woods, Matthew Lehet (2012). Context Modulates the Contribution of Time and Space in Causal Inference. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    Humans use kinematic temporal and spatial information from the environment to infer the causal dynamics (e.g., force) of an event. We hypothesize that the basis for these inferences are malleable and modulated by contextual temporal and spatial information. Specifically, the present research investigates whether the extent of a person's ongoing experience with direct causal events (e.g., temporally contiguous and spatially continuous) alters their use of time and space in judgments of causality. Participants made inferences of causality on animated launching events (...)
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  3. Kathleen Akins (ed.) (1996). Perception. Oxford University Press.
  4. Liliana Albertazzi (1999). The Time of Presentness. A Chapter in Positivistic and Descriptive Psychology. Axiomathes 10 (1-3):49-73.
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  5. D. A. Allport (1968). Phenomenal Similarity and the Perceptual Moment Hypothesis. British Journal of Psychology 59:395-406.
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  6. Holly Andersen (2013). The Representation of Time in Agency. In Adrian Bardon & Heather Dyke (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Time. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper outlines some key issues that arise when agency and temporality are considered jointly, from the perspective of psychology, cognitive neuroscience, phenomenology, and action theory. I address the difference between time simpliciter and time as represented as it figures in phenomena like intentional binding, goal-oriented action plans, emulation systems, and ‘temporal agency’. An examination of Husserl’s account of time consciousness highlights difficulties in generalizing his account to include a substantive notion of agency, a weakness inherited by explanatory projects like (...)
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  7. Sieghard Beller Andrea Bender, Annelie Rothe-Wulf, Lisa Hüther (2012). Moving Forward in Space and Time: How Strong is the Conceptual Link Between Spatial and Temporal Frames of Reference? Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    People often use spatial vocabulary to describe temporal relations, and this increasingly has motivated attempts to map spatial frames of reference (FoRs) onto time. Recent research suggested that speech communities, which differ in how they conceptualize space, may also differ in how they conceptualize time and, more specifically, that the preferences for spatial FoRs should carry over to the domain of time. Here, we scrutinize this assumption (a) by reviewing data from recent studies on temporal references, (b) by comparing data (...)
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  8. Kathleen M. Arnold, Kathleen B. McDermott & Karl K. Szpunar (2011). Individual Differences in Time Perspective Predict Autonoetic Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):712-719.
  9. Valtteri Arstila (2012). Time Slows Down During Accidents. Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    The experienced speed of the passage of time is not constant as time can seem to fly or slow down depending on the circumstances we are in. Anecdotally accidents and other frightening events are extreme examples of the latter; people who have survived from accidents often report altered phenomenology including how everything appeared to happen in slow motion. While the experienced phenomenology has been investigated, there are no explanations about how one can have these experiences. Instead, the only recently discussed (...)
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  10. Yochai Ataria & Yuval Neria (2013). Consciousness-Body-Time: How Do People Think Lacking Their Body? [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (2):159-178.
    War captivity is an extreme traumatic experience typically involving exposure to repeated stressors, including torture, isolation, and humiliation. Captives are flung from their previous known world into an unfamiliar reality in which their state of consciousness may undergo significant change. In the present study extensive interviews were conducted with fifteen Israeli former prisoners of war who fell captive during the 1973 Yom Kippur war with the goal of examining the architecture of human thought in subjects lacking a sense of body (...)
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  11. Harald Atmanspacher, The Significance of Causally Coupled, Stable Neuronal Assemblies for the Psychological Time Arrow.
    Stable neuronal assemblies are generally regarded as neural correlates of mental representations. Their temporal sequence corresponds to the experience of a direction of time, sometimes called the psychological time arrow. We show that the stability of particular, biophysically motivated models of neuronal assemblies, called coupled map lattices, is supported by causal interactions among neurons and obstructed by non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons. This surprising relation between causality and stability suggests that those neuronal assemblies that are stable due to causal (...)
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  12. R. Banks & D. Cappon (1962). Effect of Reduced Sensory Input on Time Perception. Perceptual and Motor Skills 14.
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  13. Henri Bergson (1971). Time and Free Will. New York,Humanities Press.
  14. Richard A. Block (1996). Psychological Time and Memory Systems of the Brain. In J. T. Fraser & M. Soulsby (eds.), Dimensions of Time and Life: The Study of Time. , Volume 8.
  15. Richard A. Block (ed.) (1990). Cognitive Models of Psychological Time. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Models of psychological time / Richard A. Block -- Implicit and explicit representations of time / John A. Michon -- The evasive art of subjective time...
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  16. Richard A. Block (1979). Time and Consciousness. In G. Underwood & R. Stevens (eds.), Aspects of Consciousness, Volume 1. Academic Press.
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  17. Amanda R. Bolbecker, Zixi Cheng, Gary Felsten, King-Leung Kong, Corrinne C. M. Lim, Sheryl J. Nisly-Nagele, Lolin T. Wang-Bennett & Gerald S. Wasserman (2002). Two Asymmetries Governing Neural and Mental Timing. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):265-272.
  18. Bruno G. Breitmeyer (2002). In Support of Pockett's Critique of Libet's Studies of the Time Course of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):280-283.
  19. Jason W. Brown (1991). Self and Process: Brain States and the Conscious Present. Springer-Verlag.
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  20. Jason W. Brown (1990). Psychology of Time Awareness. Brain and Cognition 14:144-64.
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  21. John Campbell, Ordinary Thinking About Time.
    I will describe two non-standard ways of thinking about time. The first is ubiquitous in animal cognition. I will call it ‘phase time’. Suppose for example you consider a hibernating animal. This animal might have representation of the various seasons of the year, and modulate its actions dependent on the season. But it need have no distinction between the winter of one year and the winter of another; it thinks of time only in terms of repeatable phases.
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  22. Jonathan Cohen (1954). The Experience of Time. Acta Psychologica 10:207-19.
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  23. Time Consciousness (1992). Husserlian Foundations of Sartre's Treatment of Time Consciousness. In D. P. Chattopadhyaya, Lester E. Embree & Jitendranath Mohanty (eds.), Phenomenology and Indian Philosophy. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 126.
  24. Barry F. Dainton (2003). Time in Experience: Reply to Gallagher. Psyche 9 (12).
    Consciousness exists in time, but time is also to be found within consciousness: we are directly aware of both persistence and change, at least over short intervals. On reflection this can seem baffling. How is it possible for us to be immediately aware of phenomena which are not (strictly speaking) present? What must consciousness be like for this to be possible? In "Stream of Consciousness" I argued that influential accounts of phenomenal temporality along the lines developed by Broad and Husserl (...)
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  25. John F. DeCarlo (2010). The Poisoning of Hamlet's Temporal Subjectivity. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 5 (12):30-40.
    The paper addresses the question: why and how does Hamlet lose track of time in the Prayer-Closet scene sequence? While Deleuze aptly notes the poetic formula “the time is out of joint” is indicative of time no longer being subordinate to cyclical rhythms of nature, or as Polonius asserts: “Time is time”(II.ii.88), but rather movement being subordinated to time, it is argued that the HAMLET text goes further in its pre-figuration of Kant’s concept that time is a mysteriously autonomous form. (...)
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  26. Frank H. Durgin & Saul Sternberg (2002). The Time of Consciousness and Vice Versa. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):284-290.
  27. Heather Dyke (2002). Mc Taggart and the Truth About Time. In Craig Callender (ed.), Time, Reality and Experience. Cambridge University Press. 137-.
    McTaggart famously argued that time is unreal. Today, almost no one agrees with his conclusion. But his argument remains the locus classicus for both the A-theory and the B-theory of time. I show how McTaggart’s argument provided the impetus for both of these opposing views of the nature of time. I also present and defend what I take to be the correct view of the nature of time.
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  28. Robert Efron (1970). The Measurement of Perceptual Durations. Studium Generale 23:550-561.
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  29. H. Eisler (1975). Subjective Duration and Psychophysics. Psychological Review 82:429-50.
  30. Andreas K. Engel (2003). Time and Conscious Visual Processing. In Hede Helfrich (ed.), Time and Mind II: Information Processing Perspectives. Hogrefe & Huber Publishers. 141-159.
  31. Vyvyan Evans (2004). The Structure of Time: Language, Meaning and Temporal Cognition. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    Drawing on findings in psychology, neuroscience, and utilising the perspective of cognitive linguistics, this work argues that our experience of time may...
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  32. J. T. Fraser (ed.) (1989). Time and Mind: Interdisciplinary Issues. International Universities Press.
  33. J. T. Fraser, F. Haber & G. Muller (eds.) (1972). The Study of Time. Springer-Verlag.
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  34. J. T. Fraser & Nathaniel M. Lawrence (eds.) (1975). The Study of Time II. Springer-Verlag.
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  35. J. T. Fraser & M. Soulsby (eds.) (1996). Dimensions of Time and Life: The Study of Time. , Volume 8.
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  36. William J. Friedman (1990). About Time: Inventing the Fourth Dimension. Cambridge: MIT Press.
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  37. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (1995). The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  38. Don Gifford (2011). Zones of Re-Membering: Time, Memory, and (Un)Consciousness. Rodopi.
    For Gifford, the profoundest explorer of the human consciousness, time, and memory is James Joyce and in its range of reference, wit, and humanity the spirit of ...
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  39. Joseph Glicksohn (2001). Temporal Cognition and the Phenomenology of Time: A Multiplicative Function for Apparent Duration. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):1-25.
    The literature on time perception is discussed. This is done with reference both to the ''cognitive-timer'' model for time estimation and to the subjective experience of apparent duration. Three assumptions underlying the model are scrutinized. I stress the strong interplay among attention, arousal, and time perception, which is at the base of the cognitive-timer model. It is suggested that a multiplicative function of two key components (the number of subjective time units and their size) should predict apparent duration. Implications for (...)
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  40. Gilberto Gomes (2002). On Experimental and Philosophical Investigations of Mental Timing: A Response to Commentary. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):304-307.
  41. Gilberto Gomes (2002). Problems in the Timing of Conscious Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):191-97.
  42. Gilberto Gomes (2002). The Interpretation of Libet's Results on the Timing of Conscious Events: A Commentary. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):221-230.
  43. W. Gooddy (1967). Introduction to Problems of Time Awareness. Studium Generale 20:33-41.
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  44. Patrick Haggard & S. Clark (2003). Intentional Action: Conscious Experience and Neural Prediction. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):695-707.
    Intentional action involves both a series of neural events in the motor areas of the brain, and also a distinctive conscious experience that ''I'' am the author of the action. This paper investigates some possible ways in which these neural and phenomenal events may be related. Recent models of motor prediction are relevant to the conscious experience of action as well as to its neural control. Such models depend critically on matching the actual consequences of a movement against its internally (...)
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  45. Stuart R. Hameroff (2003). Time, Consciousness, and Quantum Events in Fundamental Space-Time Geometry. In R. Buccheri (ed.), The Nature of Time: Geometry, Physics and Perception. 77-89.
    1. Introduction: The problems of time and consciousness What is time? St. Augustine remarked that when no one asked him, he knew what time was; however when someone asked him, he did not. Is time a process which flows? Is time a dimension in which processes occur? Does time actually exist? The notion that time is a process which "flows" directionally may be illusory (the "myth of passage") for if time did flow it would do so in some medium or (...)
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  46. R. E. Hicks, George W. Miller, G. Gaes & K. Bierman (1977). Concurrent Processing Demands and the Experience of Time-in-Passing. American Journal of Psychology 90:431-46.
  47. Hudson Hoagland (1950). Consciousness and the Chemistry of Time. In H. A. Abramson (ed.), Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the First Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
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  48. Hudson Hoagland (1943). The Chemistry of Time. Scientific Monthly 56 (3):56-61.
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  49. Christoph Hoerl (2012). Seeing Motion and Apparent Motion. European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    In apparent motion experiments, participants are presented with what is in fact a succession of two brief stationary stimuli at two different locations, but they report an impression of movement. Philosophers have recently debated whether apparent motion provides evidence in favour of a particular account of the nature of temporal experience. I argue that the existing discussion in this area is premised on a mistaken view of the phenomenology of apparent motion and, as a result, the space of possible philosophical (...)
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  50. Christoph Hoerl (2009). Time and Tense in Perceptual Experience. Philosophers' Imprint 9 (12):1-18.
    We can not just see, hear or feel how things are at a time, but we also have perceptual experiences as of things moving or changing. I argue that such temporal experiences have a content that is tenseless, i.e. best characterized in terms of notions such as 'before' and 'after' (rather than, say, 'past', 'present' and 'future'), and that such experiences are essentially of the nature of a process that takes up time, viz., the same time as the process that (...)
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