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Summary Unsurprisingly, many applied ethicists will recognize the importance of toleration.  We can ask, after all, whether acts like aborting a fetus are moral and we can ask if those same acts should be tolerated, whether or not they are moral.  More surprisingly, perhaps, is the extensive discussions about  toleration in education.  Both of these topics are covered by the pieces in this subcategory.
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  1. Makram Abbes (2005). La question de la tolérance en Occident et en islam à travers le livre de Yves-Charles Zarka et Cynthia Fleury : Difficile tolérance. Astérion 3:325-375.
    Difficile tolérance est écrit par Yves-Charles Zarka avec la collaboration de Cynthia Fleury en vue d’étudier la question de la tolérance dans les sociétés occidentales et la place qu’occupent les communautés arabo-musulmanes au sein de ces sociétés. Les deux auteurs mettent l’accent sur l’incompatibilité entre les valeurs de l’Occident et celles de l’islam ; ils défendent l’idée de l’impossibilité de l’émergence de la tolérance dans la culture de l’islam et soulignent la nécessité de réagir face aux revendications communautaires, de plus (...)
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  2. Nysanbayev Abdumalik (2008). Globalization and the Planetary Ethics Establishment. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 3:75-81.
    The global principles must be the response to the globalizing world. If it is a global selfishness, the humanity will collapse. That is why; the global elfishness should be opposed by the common to all humanity sacral values or the lanetary ethics. Planetary ethics is the whole complex of interconnected principles, ideas and sets, - the complex that ought to be brought to a working system, - dynamic and strict. All these ideals and principles flows from the common to all (...)
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  3. Joseph Agassi, Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom: Popper's Popular Critics.
    Two suggestions are at the back of the present talk. First, toleration is obligatory, not criticism. So do not try to make people critically-minded: do not force them in any way to try to offer or accept criticism, to learn to participate effectively in the game of critical discussion. If they refuse, then they are within their right. Also, they will easily ad vance excuses for their refusal; admittedly some of these are unreasonable, but not all. Instead of trying to (...)
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  4. Mohamed M. Ahmed, Kun Young Chung & John W. Eichenseher (2003). Business Students' Perception of Ethics and Moral Judgment: A Cross-Cultural Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):89 - 102.
    Business relations rely on shared perceptions of what is acceptable/expected norms of behavior. Immense expansion in transnational business made rudimentary consensus on acceptable business practices across cultural boundaries particularly important. Nonetheless, as more and more nations with different cultural and historical experiences interact in the global economy, the potential for misunderstandings based on different expectations is magnified. Such misunderstandings emerge in a growing literature on "improper" business practices – articulated from a narrow cultural perspective. This paper reports an ongoing research (...)
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  5. Brenda Almond (2010). Tolerance, Secularism and Culture: Reply to Blum. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):161-163.
    In response to Lawrence Blum?s critique of my paper ?Education for tolerance?, I argue that the state should not use its control of schools and the content of teaching to impose a new and controversial interpretation of parenthood, nor to preempt parents? right to an education for their children that is consistent with their own religious and moral convictions.
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  6. Brenda Almond (1997). Counselling for Tolerance. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):19-30.
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  7. Elsie C. Ameen, Daryl M. Guffey & Jeffrey J. McMillan (1996). Gender Differences in Determining the Ethical Sensitivity of Future Accounting Professionals. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (5):591 - 597.
    This paper explores possible connections between gender and the willingness to tolerate unethical academic behavior. Data from a sample of 285 accounting majors at four public institutions reveal that females are less tolerant than males when questioned about academic misconduct. Statistically significant differences were found for 17 of 23 questionable activities. Furthermore, females were found to be less cynical and less often involved in academic dishonesty. Overall, the results support the finding of Betz et al. (1989) that the gender socialization (...)
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  8. António Tomas Ana & Patrício Batsîkama (2008). Etonism, Philosophy of Tolerant Reason. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:29-44.
    The term etonism reflects the Angolan ancestral philosophy… Etona in Kikôngo, etonolo or etonuilo in Umbûndu: allegations, reasons, indulgence (tolerance). In Nyaneka form is etŏnya. These significances constitute the essence of the etonism: 1) reasons, 2) allegations, 3) indulgence, 4) evidence that generates the justice and the tolerance. «Who is correct tolerates who is wrong». Also, Etonism identifies 1) racism, 2) tribalism and 3) discrimination as a serious sequel of neo-colonialism, and calls the attention of the Angolan people, using roots (...)
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  9. Neal M. Ashkanasy, Sarah Falkus & Victor J. Callan (2000). Predictors of Ethical Code Use and Ethical Tolerance in the Public Sector. Journal of Business Ethics 25 (3):237 - 253.
    This paper reports the results of a survey of ethical attitudes, values, and propensities in public sector employees in Australia. It was expected that demographic variables, personal values, and contextual variables at the individual level, and group- and organisational-level values would predict use of formal codes of ethics and ethical tolerance (tolerance of unethical behaviour). Useable data were received from 500 respondents selected at random across public sector organisations in a single Australian state. Results supported the study hypotheses, but indicated (...)
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  10. Graham Badley (2009). A Place From Where to Speak: The University and Academic Freedom. British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (2):146 - 163.
    The university is promoted as 'a place from where to speak'. Academic freedom is examined as a crucial value in an increasingly uncertain age which resonates with Barnett's concern to encourage students to overcome their 'fear of freedom'. My concern is that the putative university space of freedom and autonomy may well become constricted by those who would limit not just our freedom to speak but also our freedoms to be and to do. Without academic freedom students and teachers, who (...)
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  11. Annette Baier (2010). Reflections On How We Live. OUP Oxford.
    The pioneering moral philosopher Annette Baier presents a series of new and recent essays in ethics, broadly conceived to include both engagements with other philosophers and personal meditations on life. Baier's unique voice and insight illuminate a wide range of topics. In the public sphere, she enquires into patriotism, what we owe future people, and what toleration we should have for killing. In the private sphere, she discusses honesty, self-knowledge, hope, sympathy, and self-trust, and offers personal reflections on faces, friendship, (...)
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  12. Alison Bailey (2001). Taking Responsibility for Community Violence. In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), FEMINISTS DOING ETHICS.
    This article examines the responses of two communities to hate crimes in their cities. In particular it explores how community understandings of responsibility shape collective responses to hate crimes. I use the case of Bridesberg, Pennsylvania to explore how anti-racist work is restricted by backward-looking conceptions of moral responsibility (e.g. being responsible). Using recent writings in feminist ethics.(1) I argue for a forward-looking notion that advocates an active view: taking responsibility for attitudes and behaviors that foster climates in which hate (...)
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  13. Peter A. Balint (2010). Avoiding an Intolerant Society: Why Respect of Difference May Not Be the Best Approach. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):129-141.
    The building and maintaining of a tolerant society requires both a general policy of toleration on the behalf of the state, as well as a minimal number of acts of intolerance by individual citizens towards their fellow citizens. It is this second area of citizen-citizen relations that is of most interest for education policy. There are those who argue that the best way to achieve a tolerant society is by encouraging, or even requiring, the respect and appreciation of difference amongst (...)
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  14. Matthew Beard (2013). Risking Aggression: Toleration of Threat and Preventive War. Heythrop Journal 54 (5):n/a-n/a.
    Generally speaking, just war theory (JWT) holds that there are two just causes for war: self-defence and ‘other-defence’. The most common type of the latter is popularly known as ‘humanitarian intervention’. There is debate, however, as to whether these can serve as just causes for preventive war. Those who subscribe to JWT tend to be unified in treating so-called preventive war with a high degree of suspicion on the grounds that it fails to satisfy conventional criteria for jus ad bello; (...)
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  15. Petru Bejan (2010). About Hospitality And Tolerance In South-Eastern Europe. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):36-46.
    We almost can’t find among the countries of the East one not to praise or to display as own virtues – particular or specific – hospitality and tolerance. In fact, to project such qualities in a privileged register of categories is a part of a quasi-generalized imagologic strategy meant to valorize the positive character of some traits – ethnic, national or belonging to a group. Each country needs a favorable mythology, luxuriant in fairytales, heroes, acts of bravery, one in which (...)
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  16. M. Bessone (2013). Beyond Liberal Multicultural Toleration: A Critical Approach to Groups' Essentialism. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):271-287.
    The article will argue that, despite Will Kymlicka’s claims to the contrary, the concept of ‘multicultural toleration’ implicitly entails an essentialist concept of groups, which amounts to holding a negative ‘permission’, power-loaded conception of toleration and not a positive liberal ‘respect’ conception. This seems contradictory to the general goal of Kymlicka’s multiculturalism. This article will then argue that multicultural toleration is not a satisfactory concept, neither from a conceptual point of view (it is incoherent) nor from a practical point of (...)
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  17. Magali Bessone, Gideon Calder & Federico Zuolo (forthcoming). How Groups Matter: Challenges of Toleration in Pluralistic Societies. Routledge.
    When groups feature in political philosophy, it is usually in one of three contexts: the redressing of past or current injustices suffered by ethnic or cultural minorities; the nature and scope of group rights; and questions around how institutions are supposed to treat a certain specific identity/cultural/ethnic group. What is missing from these debates is a comprehensive analysis of groups as both agents and objects of social policies. While this has been subject to much scrutiny by sociologists and social psychologists, (...)
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  18. Nigel Biggar (2009). Saving the "Secular": The Public Vocation of Moral Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):159-178.
    The London suicide bombings of July 7, 2005 were partly the revolt of moral earnestness against a liberal society that, enchanted by the fantasy of rationalist anthropology, surrenders its passionate members to a degrading consumerism. The "humane" liberalism variously espoused by Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls, and Jeffrey Stout offers a dignifying alternative; but it is fragile, and each of its proponents looks for allies among certain kinds of religious believer. Stanley Hauerwas, however, counsels Christians against cooperation. On the one hand, (...)
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  19. Maryann Bird, What Will Turkey Tolerate?
    On the grounds of a former Ottoman palace overlooking the Bosphorus, member nations of the European Union and the Organization of the Islamic Conference met in the first-ever O.I.C.-E.U. Joint Forum, initiated by Turkey in the aftermath of Sept. 11 "to promote understanding and harmony among civilizations." Some 70 nations took part, including Iran and Iraq, two points on Washington's "axis of evil." As Turkish officials led their guests in discussing tolerance, appreciation of cultural diversity and the understanding of different (...)
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  20. Jeffrey P. Bishop (2004). Modern Liberalism, Female Circumcision, and the Rationality of Traditions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):473 – 497.
    Tolerance is at the heart of Western liberalism, permitting mutually exclusive ideas and practices to coexist peacefully with one another, without the proponents of the differing ideas and practices killing one another. Yet, nothing challenges tolerance like the practice of sunna, female circumcision, clitorectomy, or genital mutilation. In this essay, I critique the Western critics of the practices, not in order to defend these practices, but rather to show that Western liberalism itself does not offer transcultural and transtemporal principles, for (...)
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  21. Lawrence Blum (2010). Secularism, Multiculturalism and Same-Sex Marriage: A Comment on Brenda Almond's 'Education for Tolerance'. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):145-160.
    Although Almond argues that the contemporary West has lost touch with the value of tolerance, I argue that that value applied to those of different religions and sexual orientations is too minimal a standard for a pluralistic society. I suggest, in the spirit of the work of Charles Taylor and Tariq Modood, the more robust standard of respect and acceptance. In addition, I have criticised Almond?s privileging of parental values over school values, seeing in that privileging a failure to recognise (...)
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  22. Paul Bou-habib (2006). A Theory of Religious Accommodation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):109–126.
  23. Nan Boyd (2000). Policing Queers: San Francisco's History of Repression and Resistance. Radical Philosophy Review 3 (1):20-27.
    Ever since it was annexed from northern Mexico in 1848, San Francisco has catered to tourists attracted to its good year-round weather, natural splendor, as well as its licentious entertainment industry and, since the 1950s, the buoyancy of its lesbian and gay community. The author looks at the growth and vibrancy of alternative lifestyles in San Francisco, arguing that the visibility of the queer community there is not the result of general tolerance in the Western outpost but, paradoxically, the outcome (...)
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  24. Joseph Boyle (1994). Radical Moral Disagreement in Contemporary Health Care: A Roman Catholic Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (2):183-200.
    This paper addresses the moral challenges presented by the existence of radical moral disagreement in contemporary health care. I argue that there is no neutral moral perspective for understanding and resolving these challenges, but that they must be formulated and resolved from within the various perspectives that generate the disagreement. I then explore the natural law tradition's approach to these issues as a test case for my thesis. Keywords: moral conflict, moral perplexity, natural law, radical moral disagreement, toleration CiteULike Connotea (...)
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  25. Ann Breslin (1982). Tolerance and Moral Reasoning Among Adolescents in Ireland. Journal of Moral Education 11 (2):112-127.
    This research was undertaken in order to investigate the relationship between tolerance and moral reasoning among adolescents in Northern Ireland and in the Irish Republic. A study of Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development led to the expectation that individuals who understood the ?principled? level of moral reasoning would be more tolerant than those who reasoned predominantly at the ?conventional? level. The subjects of this research, all senior students, completed a questionnaire which furnished data on their level of moral reasoning, (...)
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  26. Walker Brian (1995). John Rawls, Mikhail Bakhtin, and the Praxis of Toleration. Political Theory 23 (1).
  27. Donald Bruce (2003). Contamination, Crop Trials, and Compatibility. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (6):595-604.
    This paper examines the ethical andsocial questions that underlie the present UKdiscussion whether GM crops and organicagriculture can co-exist within a given regionor are mutually exclusive. A EuropeanCommission report predicted practicaldifficulties in achieving sufficientseparation distances to guarantee lowerthreshold levels proposed for GM material inorganic produce. Evidence of gene flow betweensome crops and their wild relatives has beena key issue in the recent Government consultation toconsult on whether or not to authorizecommercial planting of GM crops, following theresults of the current UK (...)
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  28. Samuel Engle Burr (1952). Tolerance, Intolerance, and Prejudice. Educational Theory 2 (2):116-120.
  29. Les Burwood & Ros Wyeth (1998). Should Schools Promote Toleration? Journal of Moral Education 27 (4):465-473.
    Abstract It is often taken for granted by educationalists that toleration is a good thing; indeed, it is often taken for granted that toleration is a value which should be promoted in schools. It is thought to be especially valuable in a multicultural society such as modern Britain. But is this so, and why? In this paper we show that the issue of whether toleration should be promoted as a virtue in schools is controversial and its value needs careful consideration (...)
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  30. Eamonn Callan (2004). Creating Citizens: Political Education and Liberal Democracy. OUP Oxford.
    Oxford Political Theory presents the best new work in contemporary political theory. It is intended to be broad in scope, including original contributions to political philosophy, and also work in applied political theory. The series contains works of outstanding quality with no restriction as to approach or subject matter. The series editors are Will Kymlicka, David Miller, and Alan Ryan. -/- Any liberal democratic state must honour religious and cultural pluralism in its educational policies. To fail to honour them would (...)
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  31. Eamonn Callan (1989). Godless Moral Education and Liberal Tolerance. Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (2):267–281.
  32. M. Caputi (2011). The Parergonal Politics of Barack Obama. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):823-840.
    This article offers a Derridean analysis of Barack Obama’s statement that, as president, he would be willing to negotiate with political actors dubbed ‘terrorists’, ‘rogues’, ‘enemies’, or members of the ‘axis of evil’. The article argues that the Derridean concept of the ‘parergonal’ is useful, as is the Derridean distinction between hospitality and tolerance. This is because a parergonal approach to politics, evidenced in a willingness to listen to those that others have ignored, and to include those left out, illustrates (...)
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  33. Clare Chambers (2004). Are Breast Implants Better Than Female Genital Mutilation? Autonomy, Gender Equality and Nussbaum's Political Liberalism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (3):1-33.
    This essay considers the tension between political liberalism and gender equality in the light of social construction and multiculturalism. The tension is exemplified by the work of Martha Nussbaum, who tries to reconcile a belief in the universality of certain liberal values such as gender equality with a political liberal tolerance for cultural practices that violate gender equality. The essay distinguishes between first? and second?order conceptions of autonomy, and shows that political liberals mistakenly prioritise second?order autonomy. This prioritisation leads political (...)
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  34. Noam Chomsky, On Israel, Lebanon and Palestine.
    The "moral justification" is supposed to be that capturing soldiers in a cross border raid, and killing others, is an outrageous crime. We know, for certain, that Israel, the United States and other Western governments, as well as the mainstream of articulate Western opinion, do not believe a word of that. Sufficient evidence is their tolerance for many years of US backed Israeli crimes in Lebanon, including four invasions before this one, occupation in violation of Security Council orders for 22 (...)
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  35. Desmond M. Clarke (2013). The Ethics of Religious Toleration. Jurisprudence 4 (1):151-157.
    A review of Why Tolerate Religion? by Brian Leiter.
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  36. Andrew Jason Cohen (2014). Toleration. Polity.
  37. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (1994). Disqualification of Lists in Israel (1948–1984): Retrospect and Appraisal. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 13 (1):43 - 95.
    The aim is to review the decisions of the Central Elections Committee and of the Supreme Court regarding disqualification of lists in Israel. Two major questions are addressed: When should tolerance have its limits?; and, What constraints on liberty should be introduced in order to safeguard democracy? The judicial analysis focuses attention on the issue of whether the justices acted in accordance with the law. Consideration is given to the written law and to existing normative considerations which allow justices an (...)
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  38. Robert J. Colesante & Donald A. Biggs (1999). Teaching About Tolerance with Stories and Arguments. Journal of Moral Education 28 (2):185-199.
    This study investigated narrative and propositional approaches to teaching about controversial moral and political issues. The subjects included 149 graduate and 27 undergraduate students, most of whom were pursuing degrees in education. They viewed one of four videotaped teaching analogues in which a male teacher discussed two questions: (1) Should the government restrict the rights of citizens who engage in homosexual behaviours? (2) Should the government restrict the rights of citizens who engage in offensive public speech? Students viewed one of (...)
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  39. R. M. Cullen (1999). Arguments for Zero Tolerance of Sexual Contact Between Doctors and Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):482-486.
    Some doctors do enter into sexual relationships with patients. These relationships can be damaging to the patient involved. One response available to both individual doctors and to disciplinary bodies is to prohibit sexual contact between doctors and patients ("zero tolerance"). This paper considers five ways of arguing for a zero tolerance policy. The first rests on an empirical claim that such contact is almost always harmful to the patient involved. The second is based on a "principles" approach while the third (...)
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  40. Marcelo Dascal, Towards a Dialectic of Tolerance.
    I was in Bucharest for a few days, not long before the fall of Ceaucescu’s regime. The fear, both of the authorities and of the people, which reigned in the city was vividly felt everywhere. To be sure, the communist regime was based on a doctrine that called itself ‘dialectic’. Unfortunately, it was a ‘dialectic’ that had nothing to do with dialogue, with listening to the other, respecting the other, and learning from the other. It assumed that ‘truth’ and ‘justice’ (...)
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  41. Richard H. Dees (2008). Of Socinians and Homosexuals: Trust and the Limits of Toleration. In Russel Hardin, Ingrid Crepell & Stephen Macedo (eds.), Toleration on Trial. Lexington Books. 85.
  42. James J. Delaney (2003). Tolerance and Tact. Inquiry 22 (4):27-31.
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  43. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Freedom-Costs of Canonical Individualism: Enforced Euthanasia Tolerance in Belgium and the Problem of European Liberalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):333 – 362.
    Belgium's policy of not permitting Catholic hospitals to refuse euthanasia services rests on ethical presuppositions concerning the secular justification of political power which reveal the paradoxical character of European liberalism: In endorsing freedom as a value (rather than as a side constraint), liberalism prioritizes first-order intentions, thus discouraging lasting moral commitments and the authority of moral communities in supporting such commitments. The state itself is thus transformed into a moral community of its own. Alternative policies (such as an explicit moral (...)
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  44. Edward Demenchonok (2008). Rethinking Cultural Diversity. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:13-23.
    At The paper analyzes the problems of cultural diversity and universality as elaborated in the concepts of “intercultural philosophy” (Ra 1 Fornet-Betancourt), “transculture” (Mikhail Epstein), and “discourse ethics” (Jürgen Habermas, Karl-Otto Apel, and Seyla Benhabib). In the postmodern theories of culture, there is an internal tension between multiculturalism and deconstruction. Multiculturalism implies an essentialist connection between cultural production and ethnic or physical origin. In contrast, the paper argues for a concept of cultural diversity free from determinism and representation. The paper (...)
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  45. P. Denis & J. -P. Massaut (1990). Le Père Leclerc, la Tolérance Et le Concile in De la Tolérance à la Liberté Religieuse. A la Mémoire du Père Joseph Lecler, SJ. Recherches de Science Religieuse 78 (1):15-39.
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  46. Philip E. Devine (1987). Relativism, Abortion, and Tolerance. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (1):131-138.
  47. B. M. Dickens (2002). Can Sex Selection Be Ethically Tolerated? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):335-336.
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  48. John Dixon & Rhys Dogan (2002). Towards Constructive Corporate Governance. Philosophy of Management 2 (3):51-71.
    This paper explores corporate governance failure by drawing upon contemporary perspectives in the philosophy of the social sciences to identify four contending perceptions of corporate governance. Each posits a set of corporate governance 'certainties that derive from incompatible contentions about what is knowable and can exist in the social world in which corporations conduct their affairs. The broad conclusion drawn is that corporate governance processes must be seen as environments where failures of governance lead to one of two possible outcomes. (...)
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  49. Drago Djuric (2013). Religious Tolerance in the Edict of Milan and in the Constitution of Medina. Filozofija I Drustvo 24 (1):277-292.
  50. F. O. X. Dov (2010). Retracing Liberalism and Remaking Nature: Designer Children, Research Embryos, and Featherless Chickens. Bioethics 24 (4):170-178.
    Liberal theory seeks to achieve toleration, civil peace, and mutual respect in pluralistic societies by making public policy without reference to arguments arising from within formative ideals about what gives value to human life. Does it make sense to set aside such conceptions of the good when it comes to controversies about stem cell research and the genetic engineering of people or animals? Whether it is reasonable to bracket our worldviews in such cases depends on how we answer the moral (...)
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