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Summary The history of toleration is largely the history of liberalism.  It is not just liberalism in a narrow understanding, though, that is concerned with toleration.  Arguably all normative political theories are.  Indeed, many moral theories speak to toleration.  There are at least two sets of issues considered by the pieces in this category: how do moral theories ground a belief in the normative value of toleration and what do normative political theories require be tolerated.
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  1. Sherman A. Jackson (2002). On the Boundaries of Theological Tolerance in Islam. Oxford University Press Pakistan.
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  2. Farid Abdel-Nour (1999). Beyond Rorty, Habermas and Rawls: Cross-Cultural Judgement in the Postmetaphysical Age. Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    This dissertation engages the following question: how, in the absence of an uncontroversial source of moral guidance, can liberals make political and moral claims across cultural divides? While committed to toleration, liberals cannot escape the compulsion to apply basic standards of equal individual human rights and liberties universally. Under postmetaphysical conditions, however, they no longer find credible arguments that assure them of the sources of these standards in "natural law," "human nature," or "practical reason." Aware that individual rights have their (...)
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  3. Olivier Abel (2004). Tolérance et laïcité. Archives de Philosophie du Droit 48:19-26.
    Après avoir exposé la diversité historique des formes de la tolérance, l’auteur cherche à montrer comment la laïcité est déchirée entre l’obligation de riposter à l’uniformisation mondiale, et celle de riposter à la balkanisation identitaire. Le problème politique du délicat passage à un régime post-national se redouble du problème théologique de la place à laisser à des convictions vivantes et créatrices, mais sincèrement pluralistes. Ce sont les deux faces d’un seul problème.
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  4. Alexander Agnello (2015). The Power of Tolerance: A Debate Wendy Brown and Rainer Forst Columbia University Press, 2014; 112 Pp.; $15.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 54 (3):557-559.
  5. Ely Aharonson (2008). Wendy Brown, Regulating Aversion: Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (2):201-206.
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  6. Scott F. Aikin & Jason Aleksander (2013). Nicholas of Cusa's De Pace Fidei and the Meta-Exclusivism of Religious Pluralism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):219-235.
    In response to the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Nicholas of Cusa wrote De pace fidei defending a commitment to religious tolerance on the basis of the notion that all diverse rites are but manifestations of one true religion. Drawing on a discussion of why Nicholas of Cusa is unable to square the two objectives of arguing for pluralistic tolerance and explaining the contents of the one true faith, we outline why theological pluralism is compromised by its own (...)
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  7. R. Alavi (2003). Impartiality in Moral and Political Philosophy By Susan Mendus. Auslegung 26 (2):101-105.
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  8. Yann Allard-Tremblay (2015). Human Rights, Specification and Communities of Inquiry. Global Constitutionalism 4 (2): 254-287.
    This paper offers a revised political conception of human rights informed by legal pluralism and epistemic considerations. In the first part, I present the political conception of human rights. I then argue for four desiderata that such a conception should meet to be functionally applicable. In the rest of the first section and in the second section, I explain how abstract human rights norms and the practice of specification prevent the political conception from meeting these four desiderata. In the last (...)
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  9. Michael W. Allen (2003). William James: Social Philosopher. Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
    Chapter One distinguishes the early, individualistic, writings from the later, more socially conscious ones. The metaphysical language of impermeable surfaces and levels, and rigid hierarchies, is consonant in James's writing with the assumption of what Dewey calls an individual/society split. ;Chapter Two focuses upon the relational self from the Principles of Psychology. The central pair of terms is that of strength/fragility, in which a self is revealed that is both functionally efficacious through activities of emphasis, selection, and negation, and permeable (...)
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  10. Sybol Cook Anderson (2009). Hegel's Theory of Recognition: From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity. Continuum.
    Introduction: Redeeming recognition -- Oppression reconsidered -- Foundations of a liberal conception -- Toward a liberal conception of oppression -- Conclusion : A liberal conception of oppression -- Misrecognition as oppression -- Exploitation and disempowerment -- Cultural imperialism -- Marginalization -- Violence -- Conclusion: Misrecognition as oppression -- Overcoming oppression : the limits of toleration -- Contemporary differences : matters of toleration -- John Rawls : political liberalism -- Will Kymlicka : multicultural citizenship -- Conclusion: Accommodating differences : the limits (...)
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  11. José Román Flecha Andrés (2001). Confesión Públicade Dios Ante Los Nuevos Ídolos. Salmanticensis 48 (2):239-270.
    It is said that Europe finds itself today in a post-christian situa-tion. Further, there are many who advocate abandoning monotheism in order to get back to prechristian polytheism in the hope that the plurality of gods would favour a democratic tolerance in a pluralistic world. In this article the author firstly asks if European Christians have not gone back to adoring idols and to attempting to distinguish between them in the new forms of devotion to possessiveness, to power and to (...)
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  12. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2002). Leibniz and Religious Toleration. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):601-622.
    As one might expect, throughout his life Leibniz assumed an attitude of religious toleration both ad intra (that is, toward Christians of other confessions) and ad extra (that is, toward non-Christians, notably Muslims). Focusing in particular on his epistolary exchange with the French Catholic convert Paul Pellisson-Fontanier, I argue that neither toleration ad intra nor toleration ad extra is grounded for Leibniz in indifference toward the content of revealed religion. On the contrary, Leibniz remained convinced of the objective truth of (...)
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  13. Karl-Otto Apel (1997). Plurality of the Good? The Problem of Affirmative Tolerance in a Multicultural Society From an Ethical Point of View. Ratio Juris 10 (2):199-212.
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  14. Ruben Apressyan (2012). The Principle of Toleration. Journal of Philosophical Research 37 (Supplement):223-227.
    As a moral principle toleration is universal, but only in the sense that potentially it is addressed to every rational and moral agent. The question is whether this principle is appropriate in all situations and what are those moral agents who recognize its practical actuality for them? Toleration is not an absolute ethical principle, but one among others in the context of a particular moral system. It should be given a proper place in the hierarchy of principles. Understanding toleration as (...)
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  15. D. Archard (forthcoming). Michael Walzer, On Toleration. Radical Philosophy.
  16. David Archard (1998). On Toleration. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 90.
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  17. David Archard (1996). Introduction. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 40:1-5.
    As befits a volume devoted to the topic of pluralism the contributing pieces collected here are varied. Their concern is with very different kinds of difference, and their conclusions range from an insistence that pluralism is both inevitable and desirable to a belief that it is unsustainable and perhaps remediable. The starting point for any discussion of pluralism is a recognition that we inhabit a world of differences. These differences are exhibited in moral outlooks, cultural identities, ways of life, religious (...)
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  18. Richard Arneson, Liberal Neutrality on the Good: An Autopsy.
    Should government be neutral "on the question of the good life, or of what gives value to life"?1 Some political theorists propose that governmental neutrality is a core commitment of any liberalism worth the name and a requirement of justice. For them, neutrality is the appropriate generalization of the ideal of religious tolerance. The state should be neutral in matters of religion, and neutral also in all controversies concerning the nature of the good or the ways in which it is (...)
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  19. Richard J. Arneson, Value Pluralism Does Not Support Liberalism.
    Following hints in the writings of Isaiah Berlin, some political theorists hold that the thesis of value pluralism is true and that this truth provides support for political liberalism of a sort that prescribes wide guarantees of individual liberty.1 There are many different goods, and they are incommensurable. Hence, people should be left free to live their own lives as they choose so long as they don’t harm others in certain ways. In a free society there is a strong presumption (...)
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  20. Christian Arnsperger (forthcoming). John Rawls et l'engagement moral. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    Cet article analyse la manière dont l'engagement moral individuel est traité dans la théorie de la justice de John Rawls. En partant de la distinctionclé entre rationnel et raisonnable, la notion de « conformité » est décomposée en plusieurs strates. A une forme minimale de la conformité s'ajoutent des notions d'adhésion faible et d'adhésion forte. Diverses maximes de comportement individuel sont discutées, qui correspondent à différents degrés d'exigence morale. L'article s'achève sur une réflexion plus large sur le lien entre engagement (...)
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  21. Richard Ashcraft (ed.) (1991). John Locke: Critical Assessments. Routledge.
    This work is the second in the Routledge Series of Critical Assessments of Leading Political Philosophers . Each volume of the series presents a comprehensive selection of the critical literature commenting on the life and works of a major political philosopher. John Locke (1632-1704) is a key figure because his political philosophy was one of the foundations for both the American Constitution and the French Revolution. He defined government as based on a free contract between people which can be subsequently (...)
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  22. Roger Aubert, Louis Bouyer, Lucien Cerfaux, Yves Congar, Albert Dondeyne & Augustin Léonard (1954). Tolérance et communauté humaine. Chrétiens dans un monde divisé. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 59 (1):98-98.
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  23. Robert Audi (forthcoming). Democracy, Secularity, and Toleration. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  24. Robert Audi (2014). Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Democratic states must protect the liberty of citizens and must accommodate both religious liberty and cultural diversity. This democratic imperative is one reason for the increasing secularity of most modern democracies. Religious citizens, however, commonly see a secular state as unfriendly toward religion. This book articulates principles that enable secular governments to protect liberty in a way that judiciously separates church and state and fully respects religious citizens.After presenting a brief account of the relation between religion and ethics, the book (...)
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  25. Robert Audi (2011). Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State. OUP Usa.
    This book clarifies the relation between religion and ethics, articulates principles governing religion in politics, and outlines a theory of civic virtue. It frames institutional principles to guide governmental policies toward religion and counterpart standards to guide individual citizens; and it defends an account of toleration that leavens the ethical framework both in individual nations and internationally.
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  26. Robert Audi (2009). Science Education, Religious Toleration, and Liberal Neutrality Toward the Good. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press
  27. Daniel Augenstein (2010). Tolerance and Liberal Justice. Ratio Juris 23 (4):437-459.
    Tolerance, the mere “putting up” with disapproved behaviour and practices, is often considered a too negative and passive engagement with difference in the liberal constitutional state. In response, liberal thinkers have either discarded tolerance, or assimilated it to the moral and legal precepts of liberal justice. In contradistinction to these approaches I argue that there is something distinctive and valuable about tolerance that should not be undermined by more ambitious, rights-based models of social cooperation. I develop a conception of tolerance (...)
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  28. José Manuel Bermudo Avila (1999). La tolerancia (del liberalismo al pluralismo). Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 33:243-260.
    En el artículo se contraponen, argumentan y valoran dos conceptos de la tolerancia. Uno, de raíz ilustrada, compatible con la posibilidad de establecer preferencias racionales entre los modelos de comunidad política, criterios de justicia o formas de vida; se trata de una tolerancia respecto a las personas (y sus derechos a expresarse y a elegir su plan de vida) compatible con la crítica radical a sus ideas y representaciones. El otro concepto, coherente con la actual ideología del pluralismo, que afirma (...)
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  29. Mitch Avila (2011). Human Rights and Toleration in Rawls. Human Rights Review 12 (1):1-14.
    In a Society of Peoples as Rawls conceives it, human rights function as “criteria for toleration.” This paper defends the conception of human rights that appears in Rawls’ The Law of Peoples as normatively and theoretically adequate. I claim that human rights function as criteria for determining whether or not a given society or legal system can be tolerated. As such, “human rights” are not themselves basic facts or judgments or ascriptions, but rather the means by which we collectively attempt (...)
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  30. Josette Baer, Appreciating Minorities or Why Tolerance is Not Enough. Is Power Sharing the ‘Moral Must’ in International Politics?
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  31. Annette Baier (2012). Reflections on How We Live. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The pioneering moral philosopher Annette Baier presents a series of new and recent essays in ethics, broadly conceived to include both engagements with other philosophers and personal meditations on life. Baier's unique voice and insight illuminate a wide range of topics. In the public sphere, she enquires into patriotism, what we owe future people, and what toleration we should have for killing. In the private sphere, she discusses honesty, self-knowledge, hope, sympathy, and self-trust, and offers personal reflections on faces, friendship, (...)
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  32. Annette Baier (2010). Reflections on How We Live. OUP Oxford.
    The pioneering moral philosopher Annette Baier presents a series of new and recent essays in ethics, broadly conceived to include both engagements with other philosophers and personal meditations on life. Baier's unique voice and insight illuminate topics ranging from patriotism and future generations to honesty, trust, hope, and friendship.
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  33. Storm Bailey (unknown). Tolerance and Hospitality as Virtues. Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 23 (1):62-68.
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  34. Tom Bailey & Valentina Gentile (2012). Religion and the Limits of Liberalism. Philosophia 40 (2):175-178.
    This is the editors' preface to a special issue of Philosophia on 'Religion and Limits of Liberalism'. It begins by noting the challenges which the 'return' of religions to liberal democracies poses to the liberal commitment to respect citizens’ freedom and equality. Then, with particular reference to Rawls' theory of liberal politics, it situates the papers in relation to three different senses of liberal ‘respect’ that are challenged by contemporary religions – one understood in terms of the justification of political (...)
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  35. Jean J. Baillargeon (1996). Toleration and Equality: A Defense of Political Liberalism. Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
    This thesis offers an interpretation of liberalism that reconciles religious toleration and political equality. It stresses the influence of John Locke's argument for toleration on the recent work of John Rawls, and discusses contemporary problems pertaining to religious freedom, cultural membership, gender equality and the education of children. ;The aim of Chapter One is to stress the starting point of liberal theory, namely that a special warrant is needed to underwrite the power of the state to force citizens to comply (...)
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  36. C. Edwin Baker (2008). Rawls, Equality, and Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (3):203-246.
    Part I distinguishes epistemic and choice democracy, attributing the first to the Rawls of A Theory of Justice but arguing that the second is more justifiable. Part II argues that in comparison with the difference principle, three principles — equal participation in choice democracy, no subordinating purpose, and a just wants guarantee — constitute a more rational choice in the original position; and that they better provide all the benefits claimed for the difference principle in its comparison with either average (...)
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  37. Oded Balaban (2004). Democracy and the Limits of Tolerance. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 12.
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  38. Thomas Baldwin (1985). Toleration and the Right to Freedon. In John Horton & Susan Mendus (eds.), Aspects of Toleration: Philosophical Studies. Methuen
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  39. Peter Balint (2014). Toleration, by Andrew Jason Cohen. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):816-817.
  40. Peter Balint (2014). Toleration, by Andrew Jason Cohen. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):816-817.
  41. Peter Balint (2012). Not yet Making Sense of Political Toleration. Res Publica 18 (3):259-264.
    Abstract A growing number of theorists have argued that toleration, at least in its traditional sense, is no longer applicable to liberal democratic political arrangements—especially if these political arrangements are conceived of as neutral. Peter Jones has tried make sense of political toleration while staying true to its more traditional (disapproval yet non-prevention) meaning. In this article, while I am sympathetic to his motivation, I argue that Jones’ attempt to make sense of political toleration is not successful. Content Type Journal (...)
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  42. Peter A. Balint (2010). Avoiding an Intolerant Society: Why Respect of Difference May Not Be the Best Approach. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (1):129-141.
    The building and maintaining of a tolerant society requires both a general policy of toleration on the behalf of the state, as well as a minimal number of acts of intolerance by individual citizens towards their fellow citizens. It is this second area of citizen-citizen relations that is of most interest for education policy. There are those who argue that the best way to achieve a tolerant society is by encouraging, or even requiring, the respect and appreciation of difference amongst (...)
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  43. Giuseppe Ballacci (2004). Cary J. Nederman: Worlds of Difference: European Discourses of Toleration, C. 1100-C. 1550. The Pennsylvania State University Press, University Park, Pennsylvania. [REVIEW] Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política 4:192-194.
  44. Barry Barnes (2001). Tolerance as a Primary Virtue. Res Publica 7 (3):231-245.
    The commonly perceived tension between authentic moral and ethical action and action involving tolerance is held to be the illusory product of an unduly individualistic frame of thought. Moral and ethical actions are produced not by independent individuals but by participants in cultural traditions. And even the wholly routine continuation of a single homogeneous tradition must always and invariably involve mutual tolerance: participants must interact not as independent individuals but as tolerant members. Tolerance deserves recognition, accordingly, as a primary virtue, (...)
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  45. Philip Barnes (2006). The Misrepresentation of Religion in Modern British (Religious) Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (4):395 - 411.
    The purpose of this paper is to articulate a new perspective on British multi-faith religious education that both complements and, in part, subsumes existing critiques. My argument, while controversial, is straightforward: it is that British religious education has misrepresented the nature of religion in efforts to commend itself as contributing to the social aims of education, as these are typically framed in liberal democratic societies. Contemporary multi-faith religious education is placed in context and its underlying theological and philosophical commitments identified (...)
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  46. Barnes Barry (2001). Tolerance as a Primary Virtue. Res Publica 7 (3).
  47. Charles Bastide (1907). John Locke Ses Théories Politiques Et Leur Influence En Angleterre. Les Libertés Politiques - L'église Et l'État - la Tolérance. E. Leroux.
  48. Jean Baubérot & Claude-Jean Lenoir (1997). La Tolérance Ou la Liberté? Les Leçons de Voltaire Et de Condorcet. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  49. Brian Baxter (1989). On Toleration. Philosophical Books 30 (1):53-54.
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  50. Raymond Andrew Bazowski (1994). Ronald Dworkin's Legal and Political Philosophy. Dissertation, Carleton University (Canada)
    Ronald Dworkin is one of the most important contemporary legal and political writers in the English-speaking world. This thesis analyzes the connection between Dworkin's political, moral, and jurisprudential theories. In legal circles Dworkin is best known for his celebrated "right answer" thesis which proposes that hard cases in law do have right answers. To sustain this thesis Dworkin develops a novel theory of law in which adjudication is portrayed as an interpretative exercise involving moral and political as well as strictly (...)
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1 — 50 / 1139