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Toleration is much discussed for many reasons, some obvious, some less so.  Historically, of course, it was classical liberals that began the push for toleration of differing religions.  More recently, debates have shifted to discussing cultural toleration.  Theology plays a role in both.  Given these facts, in this subcategory are many items about toleration and religion, culture, and theology.  And more.

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  1. Brenda Almond (2010). Education for Tolerance: Cultural Difference and Family Values. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):131-143.
    Those who would defend liberal democracy in today?s changing world face a new toleration debate. While we still want to help our children grow up to see the world from other perspectives than their own, we are no longer as sure as we were that we know what toleration means or what it entails. Where education is concerned, it seems the focus is on tolerance as an attitude?encouraging people to be tolerant?but where the public debate is concerned, the focus is (...)
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  2. Brenda Almond (2010). Tolerance, Secularism and Culture: Reply to Blum. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):161-163.
    In response to Lawrence Blum?s critique of my paper ?Education for tolerance?, I argue that the state should not use its control of schools and the content of teaching to impose a new and controversial interpretation of parenthood, nor to preempt parents? right to an education for their children that is consistent with their own religious and moral convictions.
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  3. António Tomas Ana & Patrício Batsîkama (2008). Etonian Jusphilosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:13-28.
    The term etonism is from «Etona» that means flag, marks, evidence, and reason in Kikôngo. The variants in Umbûndu: etonolo or etonuilo means, allegations, reasons, indulgence (tolerance). The Nyaneka form is etŏnya: 1) reasons, 2) allegations, 3) indulgence and 5) the justice and the tolerance. Etona is Angolan artist (sculptor/painter). In his sculpture they are morphologically evidenced three treatments in the surface of the matter, namely 1) flat treatment; 2) rude treatment and finally 3) accidental treatment. Each one is a (...)
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  4. António Tomas Ana & Patrício Batsîkama (2008). Etonian Jusphilosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:13-28.
    The term etonism is from «Etona» that means flag, marks, evidence, and reason in Kikôngo. The variants in Umbûndu: etonolo or etonuilo means, allegations, reasons, indulgence (tolerance). The Nyaneka form is etŏnya: 1) reasons, 2) allegations, 3) indulgence and 5) the justice and the tolerance. Etona is Angolan artist (sculptor/painter). In his sculpture they are morphologically evidenced three treatments in the surface of the matter, namely 1) flat treatment; 2) rude treatment and finally 3) accidental treatment. Each one is a (...)
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  5. António Tomas Ana & Patrício Batsîkama (2008). Etonian Jusphilosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:13-28.
    The term etonism is from «Etona» that means flag, marks, evidence, and reason in Kikôngo. The variants in Umbûndu: etonolo or etonuilo means, allegations, reasons, indulgence (tolerance). The Nyaneka form is etŏnya: 1) reasons, 2) allegations, 3) indulgence and 5) the justice and the tolerance. Etona is Angolan artist (sculptor/painter). In his sculpture they are morphologically evidenced three treatments in the surface of the matter, namely 1) flat treatment; 2) rude treatment and finally 3) accidental treatment. Each one is a (...)
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  6. A. E. Asira (2007). Nigerian Traditional Religion: A Religion of Tolerance. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 7 (1).
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  7. Robert Audi (2009). Science Education, Religious Toleration, and Liberal Neutrality Toward the Good. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.
  8. Jovan Babić (2004). Toleration Vs. Doctrinal Evil in Our Time. Journal of Ethics 8 (3):225-250.
    Our time is characterized by what seems like an unprecedented process of intense global homogenization. This reality provides the context for exploring the nature and value of toleration. Hence, this essay is meant primarily as a contribution to international ethics rather than political philosophy. It is argued that because of the non-eliminability of differences in the world we should not even hope that there can be only one global religion or ideology. Further exploration exposes conceptual affinity between the concepts of (...)
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  9. Tom Bailey & Valentina Gentile (2012). Religion and the Limits of Liberalism. Philosophia 40 (2):175-178.
    This is the editors' preface to a special issue of Philosophia on 'Religion and Limits of Liberalism'. It begins by noting the challenges which the 'return' of religions to liberal democracies poses to the liberal commitment to respect citizens’ freedom and equality. Then, with particular reference to Rawls' theory of liberal politics, it situates the papers in relation to three different senses of liberal ‘respect’ that are challenged by contemporary religions – one understood in terms of the justification of political (...)
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  10. Giorgio Baruchello (2002). Worlds of Difference: European Discourses of Toleration, C. 1100-C. 1550 Cary J. Nederman University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000, X + 157 Pp., $40.00, $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):802-.
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  11. Magali Bessone (2013). Will the Real Tolerant Racist Please Stand Up? Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):209-223.
    One of the most perplexing paradoxes of toleration concerns the ‘tolerant racist’. According to most current definitions of toleration, a person is considered tolerant if, and only if, 1) he refrains from interfering with something 2) he deeply disapproves of, 3) in spite of having the power to interfere. Hence, a racist who refrains from discriminating against members of races he considers inferior despite having the power to do so, should be considered a tolerant person. Moreover, a person can apparently (...)
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  12. Michael Blake (2007). Toleration and Theocracy: How Liberal States Should Think About Religious States. Journal of International Affairs 61 (1):1-17.
  13. Bernard Botiveau (1997). Tolerance and Law: From Islamic Culture to Islamist Ideology. Ratio Juris 10 (1):61-74.
  14. A. Bouhdiba (1996). On Islamic Tolerance. Diogenes 44 (176):121-136.
  15. Vernon J. Bourke (1978). Lamirande on Augustine and Tolerance. Augustinian Studies 9:103-108.
  16. L. Bretherton (2004). Tolerance, Education and Hospitality: A Theological Proposal. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (1):80-103.
    This article gives a critique of the notion of tolerance and the promotion of tolerance in education as a means of fostering respect for the ‘other’. In its place the theologically specified notion of hospitality is proposed. In the process of doing this, the article addresses three questions: is there an inherent contradiction between liberal philosophies of education and the promotion of tolerance? Is tolerance the best way to enable genuine respect for the ‘other’? And is tolerance something Christians should (...)
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  17. Horace James Bridges (1926/1968). Aspects of Ethical Religion. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
    Ethical mysticism, by S. Coit.--The ethical import of history, by D. S. Muzzey.--The tragic and heroic in life, by W. M. Salter.--Distinctive features of the ethical movement, by A. W. Martin.--Ethical experience as the basis of religious education, by H. Neumann.--"All men are created equal," by G. E. O'Dell.--How far is art an aid to religion? by P. Chubb.--Evolution and the uniqueness of man, by H. J. Bridges.--The spiritual outlook on life, by H. J. Golding.--The ethics of Abu'l Ala al (...)
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  18. Francesco Margiotta Broglio (1997). Tolerance and the Law. Ratio Juris 10 (2):252-265.
  19. Nathan Brown (2008). Muslim Societies, Muslim Minorities: A Commentary. In Russel Hardin, Ingrid Crepell & Stephen Macedo (eds.), Toleration on Trial. Lexington Books. 215.
  20. Wibren Van Der Burg (1998). Beliefs, Persons and Practices: Beyond Tolerance. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (2):227 - 254.
    The central thesis of this paper is that, for most issues of multiculturalism, regarding them as a problem of tolerance puts us on the wrong track because there are certain biases inherent in the principle of tolerance. These biases -- individualism, combined with a focus on religion and a focus on beliefs rather than on persons or practices -- can be regarded as distinctly Protestant. Extending the scope of tolerance may seem a solution but if we really want to counter (...)
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  21. David Burrell (2004). Review of Abu Hamid Al-Ghazali, On the Boundaries of Theological Tolerance. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (2).
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  22. Peter Byrne (2011). Religious Tolerance, Diversity, and Pluralism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68:287-309.
  23. John J. Carroll (1956). Tolerance and the Catholic. Thought 31 (4):629-629.
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  24. Emanuela Ceva (2012). Why Toleration Is Not the Appropriate Response to Dissenting Minorities' Claims. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):n/a-n/a.
    For many liberal democrats toleration has become a sort of pet-concept, to which appeal is made in the face of a myriad issues related to the treatment of minorities. Against the inflationary use of toleration, whether understood positively as recognition or negatively as forbearance, I argue that toleration may not provide the conceptual and normative tools to understand and address the claims for accommodation raised by at least one kind of significant minority: democratic dissenting minorities. These are individuals, or aggregates (...)
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  25. Joseph Chan (2002). Moral Autonomy, Civil Liberties, and Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):281-310.
    Three claims are defended. (1) There is a conception of moral autonomy in Confucian ethics that to a degree can support toleration and freedom. However, (2) Confucian moral autonomy is different from personal autonomy, and the latter gives a stronger justification for civil and personal liberties than does the former. (3) The contemporary appeal of Confucianism would be strengthened by including personal autonomy, and this need not be seen as forsaking Confucian ethics but rather as an internal revision in response (...)
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  26. Daniela-Luminita Constantin, Zizi Goschin & Mariana Dragusin (2010). Ethnic Entrepreneurship as an Integrating Factor in Civil Society and a Gate to Religious Tolerance: A Spotlight on Turkish Entrepreneurs in Romania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):49-79.
    The main aim of this article is to discuss both the concept of secularism among the Ottoman intellectuals and the principle of secularism during the period of the Turkish Republic based on ideas rather than practice. We can analyze “secularism in Turkey” in two separate periods of time: First, “The Ottoman Empire and Secularism” which discusses the ideas of secularism before the foundation of the Turkish Republic, and second “A Brief Analysis of the Turkish Republic and the Principle of Secularism” (...)
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  27. Raymond Corrigan (1934). The Development of Religious Toleration in England. Thought 9 (1):150-151.
  28. John E. Cort (2000). "Intellectual Ahiṃsā" Revisited: Jain Tolerance and Intolerance of Others. Philosophy East and West 50 (3):324-347.
    It has been widely proposed that the Jain logical methods of linguistic analysis collectively known as anekāntavāda (manypointedness) are an extension of the Jain ethical imperative of ahiṃsā (non-harm) into philosophy as a form of intellectual tolerance and relativity--described by several scholars as "intellectual ahiṃsā"--whose genealogy and development over the past sixty-five years are given in detail. It is shown how Jains used anekāntavāda to expose the relative truth of non-Jain metaphysics, while arguing that only Jain metaphysics, which alone is (...)
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  29. Allison Coudert (ed.) (1999). Judaeo-Christian Intellectual Culture in the Seventeenth Century: A Celebration of the Library of Narcissus Marsh (1638-1713). [REVIEW] Kluwer Academic.
    This work focuses on Latin Judaica and Biblical interpretation with a primary emphasis on texts that were found in the library of Archbishop Narcissus Marsh of Dublin. This remarkable collection of Latin Judaica, Polyglot Bibles, and other works sheds light on the way in which the Protestant Reformation dealt both with Jews, and the Bible, the Jewish Kabbalah and religious toleration or intolerance. The articles contained herein will be of especial interest to historians of religion and philosophy, and those (...)
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  30. Herbert H. Coulson (1941). The Development of Religious Toleration in England. Thought 16 (2):364-365.
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  31. Herbert H. Coulson (1939). The Development of Religious Toleration in England 1640-1660. Thought 14 (4):659-661.
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  32. Edwin Curley, Exploring Religious Toleration.
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  33. G. G. De Kruijf (1996). Murray (Ed. Hooper), Bridging the Sacred and the Secular, and Pavlischek, John Courteney Murray and the Dilemma of Religious Toleration. Studies in Christian Ethics 9:103-105.
  34. Richard H. Dees (2004). Trust and Toleration. Routledge.
    This book outlines the social, conceptual, and psychological preconditions for toleration.By looking closely at the religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in France and England and at contemporary controversies about the rights of homosexuals, Richard Dees demonstrates how trust between the opposing parties is needed first, but in just these cases, distrust is all-too-rational. Ultimately, that distrust can only be overcome if the parties undergo a fundamental shift of values - a conversion. Only then can they accept some (...)
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  35. Richard H. Dees (1998). Trust and the Rationality of Toleration. Noûs 32 (1):82-98.
  36. James J. Delaney & Jeffrey Dueck (2003). A Rethinking of Contemporary Religious Tolerance. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:73-82.
    In relating philosophy to intercultural understanding, one of the key problems that arises is that of the relationship between tolerance and religious belief.This paper challenges the common understanding of tolerance in contemporary debates over religious diversity. It argues that tolerance is overused and over-applied in these debates, and has wrongfully come to refer to tactlessness, harshness of condemnation, and even exclusivity of belief. In seeking to clarify the concept and ensure its appropriate usage, it proposes that religious tolerance should only (...)
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  37. Mario Delmirani (1953). Tolerance Et Communaute Humaine. Thought 28 (4):608-611.
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  38. Oyuna Dorzhiguishaeva (2008). Tolerance as the Basic Category of Buddhist Ethics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:13-19.
    The concept of tolerance is one of the basic ethical categories of Buddhism. Showing conscious tolerance, you control a situation and do not allow feelings, such as anger or arrogance to take top above reason. Besides, the tolerance to other people and different situation shows your wide scope and common emancipation. The tolerance is one of qualities inherent to bodhisattvas - sacred Buddhists. These qualities are called paramita, and paramita of tolerance - kshanti-paramita. Kshanti-paramita is triple: tolerance to other alive (...)
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  39. Svitlana Drozhzhyna & Mariya Chernyshova (2013). Формування Толерантності В Сучасному Суспільстві: Аксіологічний Аспект. Схід 3 (3(110)):135-137.
    The work presents axiological aspect of tolerance formation under conditions when each culture comprehends its tradition uniqueness and strives to prove its competitiveness under globalization; basic features of tolerance have been outlined as well.
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  40. Anthony Egan (2012). Religious Tolerance Through Humility: Thinking with Philip Quinn. Edited by James Kraft & David Basinger. Pp. Ix, 130, Aldershot, Ashgate, 2008, $88.95. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (3):540-541.
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  41. F. Etim (2006). Religion, Tolerance and National Development: The Nigerian Experience. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 8 (1).
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  42. Silvio Ferrari (1997). The New Wine and the Old Cask. Tolerance, Religion and the Law in Contemporary Europe. Ratio Juris 10 (1):75-89.
  43. Rodney Fopp (2011). “Repressive Tolerance”: Herbert Marcuse's Exercise in Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology 24 (2):105-122.
    When Herbert Marcuse's essay entitled “Repressive tolerance” was published in the mid-1960s it was trenchantly criticised because it was anti-democratic and defied the academic canon of value neutrality. Yet his argument is attracting renewed interest in the 21st century, particularly when, post 9/11, the thresholds or limits of tolerance are being contested. This article argues that Marcuse's original essay was concerned to problematise the dominant social understandings of tolerance at the time, which were more about insisting that individual citizens tolerate (...)
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  44. Rainer Forst, Toleration. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45. James Franklin (2007). Introduction. In , Life to the Full: Rights and Social Justice in Australia. Connor Court.
    The late twentieth century saw two long-term trends in popular thinking about ethics. One was an increase in relativist opinions, with the “generation of the Sixties” spearheading a general libertarianism, an insistence on toleration of diverse moral views (for “Who is to say what is right? – it’s only your opinion.”) The other trend was an increasing insistence on rights – the gross violations of rights in the killing fields of the mid-century prompted immense efforts in defence of the “inalienable” (...)
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  46. R. G. Frey (1977). TOLERATION by Preston King. Philosophical Books 18 (2):87-87.
  47. P. G. Gleis (1947). The Concept of Religious Tolerance in the Novels of Enrica Von Handel-Mazzetti. Thought 22 (3):530-532.
  48. Dmitry A. Golovushkin (2010). On the Issue of Religious Tolerance in Modern Russia: National Identity and Religion. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (7):101-110.
    The sources of religious tolerance but also of religious nationalism in post-soviet Russia can be found basically in the group identification of nationality and religion. In crisis situations, the historical religion of the Russian society - Orthodoxy - becomes the criterion for identifying the national identity. However, despite the fact that the majority of Russians in our times consider themselves Orthodox, many of them are not believers. The observable effect of the “external belief” results in the fact that the religion (...)
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  49. Ronald K. Goodenow (1977). Racial and Ethnic Tolerance in John Dewey's Educational and Social Thought: The Depression Years. Educational Theory 27 (1):48-64.
  50. Lenn Evan Goodman (2003). Islamic Humanism. Oxford University Press.
    Tracing the course of thought, action, and expression in the golden age of Islamic civilization, L. E. Goodman's Islamic Humanism paints a vivid panorama that departs strikingly from the all too familiar image of Islamic dogma, authoritarianism, and militancy. Among the poets and philosophers, scientists and historians, ethicists and mystics of Islam, Goodman finds a warm and vital humanism, committed to the pursuit of knowledge and to the cosmopolitan values of generosity, tolerance, and understanding. Drawing on a wide range of (...)
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