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  1. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women". Hypatia 20 (3):127 - 148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  2. Brian E. Butler (2010). Blackness is Noir: Flory's Philosophical Investigation of the Black Noir Genre in Film. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 14 (1):332-336.
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  3. Monica A. Coleman (2010). Creative Exchange: A Constructive Theology of African American Religious Experience (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 31 (1):73-77.
  4. Phyllis Curtis-Tweed (2003). Experiences of African American Empowerment: A Jamesian Perspective on Agency. Journal of Moral Education 32 (4):397-409.
    This essay draws from the work of William James and three African American pragmatists, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison and Cornel West, to explore the moral relevance of the self as an empowered agent among African American youth. The focus is on Jamesian agency as a function of the individual's awareness of options in context, the self-empowerment that allows one to access those options, and the resulting behaviour that actualises perceived potentials. Case examples clarify how the awareness of self as (...)
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  5. Thomas F. DeFrantz (2005). African American Dance - Philosophy, Aesthetics, and 'Beauty'. Topoi 24 (1):93-102.
    This essay considers the recuperation of beauty as a productive critical strategy in discussions of African American dance. I argue that black performance in general, and African American concert dance in particular, seeks to create aesthetic sites that allow black Americans to participate in discourses of recognition and appreciation to include concepts of beauty. In this, I suggest that beauty may indeed produce social change for its attendant audiences. I also propose that interrogating the notion of beauty may allow for (...)
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  6. Maduabuchi Dukor (2008). Feminism in Theistic Humanism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:63-76.
    An inquiry into the ontology of critical gender consciousness in Africa Philosophy is long over due. “Hitherto a discourse on Gender problems has lost focus because of the tendency to leave out the gaps in culture created by colonial experience, modernity’s assaults and unAfricaness in ontology and essence. It is argued that the fulcrum for a legitimate feminist doctrine is Theistic Humanism, the philosophy of African philosophy that exposes the epistemological and metaphysical basis of the rightful and ethical place of (...)
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  7. Stephen Nathan Haymes (2001). Pedagogy and the Philosophical Anthropology of African American Slave Culture. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):63-92.
  8. Clarence Sholé Johnson (2001). Cornel West, African American Critical Thought, and the Quest for Social Justice. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):547–572.
  9. Horace Meyer Kallen (1957). Alain Locke and Cultural Pluralism. Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):119-127.
  10. Maurice S. Lee (2005). Slavery, Philosophy, and American Literature, 1830-1860. Cambridge University Press.
    Examining the literature of slavery and race before the Civil War, Maurice Lee demonstrates for the first time exactly how the slavery crisis became a crisis of philosophy that exposed the breakdown of national consensus and the limits of rational authority. Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, and Emerson were among the antebellum authors who tried - and failed - to find rational solutions to the slavery conflict. Unable to mediate the slavery controversy as the nation moved toward war, their writings (...)
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  11. Alain LeRoy Locke (1989). The Philosophy of Alain Locke: Harlem Renaissance and Beyond. Temple University Press.
    Discusses Locke's life and views and their impact on American philosophy, as well as his role in the Harlem Renaissance.
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  12. Tommy Lee Lott (ed.) (2002). African-American Philosophy: Selected Readings. Prentice Hall.
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  13. Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.) (2003/2006). A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    This wide-ranging, multidisciplinary collection of newly commissioned articles brings together distinguished voices in the field of Africana philosophy and African-American social and political thought. Provides a comprehensive critical survey of African-American philosophical thought. Collects wide-ranging, multidisciplinary, newly commissioned articles in one authoritative volume. Serves as a benchmark work of reference for courses in philosophy, social and political thought, cultural studies, and African-American studies.
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  14. Charles W. Mills (1994). Do Black Men Have a Moral Duty to Marry Black Women? Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (s1):131-153.
  15. Vemer D. Mitchell (1997). African-American Perspectives and Philosophical Traditions. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 25 (78):20-22.
  16. J. Obi Oguejiofor (2003). Problems and Prospects of a History of African Philosophy. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):477-498.
    Although African philosophy has become a part of the world philosophic heritage that can no longer be neglected, no comprehensive history of it is available yet. This lacuna is due to the numerous problems that affect any attempt to outline such a history. Among these problems are those inherent in the historiography of philosophy in general and many others specific to African philosophy. They include the absence of scholarly unanimity over the exact nature of philosophy and, by extension, African philosophy; (...)
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  17. Lucius T. Outlaw (2009). Review of Ronald R. Sundstrom, The Browning of America and the Evasion of Social Justice. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
  18. Melanie Perrault (2008). African American Environmental Thought. Environmental Ethics 30 (4):435-436.
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  19. Robin T. Peterson (2002). The Depiction of African American Children's Activities in Television Commercials: An Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):303 - 313.
    This study involved a content analysis of the degree of portrayal and the favoribility of portrayal of African American children, as they were cast in various roles. It was hypothesized that these children would be less frequently and less positively portrayed in scholarly than in other roles and that scholarly depiction would vary among product classes. The research results did not support the first two but did support the third hypothesis. Various implications of the findings were drawn.
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  20. Gina Philogene (1994). "African American" as a New Social Representation. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (2):89–109.
  21. John P. Pittman (ed.) (1992/1997). African-American Perspectives and Philosophical Traditions. Routledge.
    A special issue of The Philosophical Forum , one of the most prestigious philosophy journals, is now available to a wider readership through its publication in book form. The volume includes twelve essays in three sections-- Philosophical Traditions; the African-American Tradition; and Racism, Identity, and Social Life. Contributors are: K. Anthony Appiah, Kwasi Wiredu, Lucius Outlaw, Leonard Harris, Bernard Boxill, Frank M. Kirkland, Tommy L. Lott, Adrian M.S. Piper, Laurence Thomas, Michele M. Moody-Adams, Anita L. Allen, and Howard McGary. The (...)
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  22. Samuel K. Roberts (2001). African American Christian Ethics. Pilgrim Press.
  23. Earl Sheridan (1988). The Diminishing Soul of Black America. Social Theory and Practice 14 (2):131-140.
  24. F. A. Sheth (2006). A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Philosophical Review 115 (2):263-267.
  25. Kimberly Smith (2004). Black Agrarianism and the Foundations of Black Environmental Thought. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):267-286.
    Beginning with the nineteenth-century critiques of slave agriculture, African American writers have been centrally concerned with their relationship to the American landscape. Drawing on and responding to the dominant ideology of democratic agrarianism, nineteenth-century black writers developed an agrarian critique of slavery and racial oppression. This black agrarianism focuses on property rights, the status of labor, and the exploitation of workers, exploring how racial oppression can prevent a community from establishing a responsible relationship to the land. Black agrarianism serves as (...)
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  26. Kimberly K. Smith (2005). What is Africa to Me?: Wilderness in Black Thought From 1860 to 1930. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):279-297.
    The concept of wilderness found in the black American intellectual tradition poses a provocative alternative to the preservationist concept. For black writers, the wilderness is not radically separate from human society but has an important historical and social dimension. Nor is it merely a feature of the external landscape; there is also a wilderness within, a vital energy that derives from and connects one to the external wilderness. Wilderness is the origin and foundation of culture; preserving it means preserving not (...)
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  27. George W. Stickel (2004). African-American Philosophy. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (98):45-47.
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  28. Ronald R. Sundstrom (2003). Arrogance, Love, and Identity in the American Struggle with Race. Social Theory and Practice 29 (1):159-172.
  29. Ronald Robles Sundstrom (2012). In The Shadow of Du Bois: Afro-Modern Political Thought in America by Robert Gooding-Williams. Constellations 19 (1):139-145.
  30. Paul C. Taylor (2007). We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity. Social Theory and Practice 33 (1):163-171.
  31. Janie Victoria Ward (1991). “Eyes in the Back of Your Head”: Moral Themes in African American Narratives of Racial Conflict. Journal of Moral Education 20 (3):267-281.
    Abstract This paper examines seven narratives of racial conflict elicited from African American adults and young people. Analysis focusses on the relational nature of the racial conflicts. Issues of power and authority inherent in the sociopolitical context in which racial knowledge develops and moral judgements regarding racial differences are determined are found to be likewise embedded in interracial interpersonal relationships. Adopting Brown & Gilligan's (1990) methodological approach to reading narratives of conflict and choice, the two moral themes of justice and (...)
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  32. George Yancy (2004). Geneva Smitherman: The Social Ontology of African-American Language, the Power of Nommo, and the Dynamics of Resistance and Identity Through Language. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4):273 - 299.
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African-American Aesthetics
  1. Kimberly W. Benston (1993). The Veil of Black: (Un)Masking the Subject of African-American Modernism's “Native Son”. Human Studies 16 (1-2):69 - 99.
  2. D. Brackett (2003). What a Difference a Name Makes : Two Instances of African-American Popular Music. In Martin Clayton, Trevor Herbert & Richard Middleton (eds.), The Cultural Study of Music: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.
  3. Tommy J. Curry (2009). I'm Too Real For Yah. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):61-77.
    I am interested in looking at Krumpin’ through what I am calling the “politics of submergence.” If my world is chaotic, if my Blackness is my murderer, can I be expected to create beauty? Can my art be transformative? My paper argues that Krumpin’ is in fact transformative, not to the extent that it perpetuates hope, but maintains its social pessimism. In accepting both the conditions that have sustained the racial marginalization of African descended people, and the impotence of this (...)
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  4. Dan Flory (2000). Black on White: Film Noir and the Epistemology of Race in Recent African American Cinema. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (1):82–116.
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  5. Eddie S. Glaude (2007). In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America. University of Chicago Press.
    In this timely book, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., one of our nation’s rising young African American intellectuals, makes an impassioned plea for black America to address its social problems by recourse to experience and with an eye set on the promise and potential of the future, rather than the fixed ideas and categories of the past. Central to Glaude’s mission is a rehabilitation of philosopher John Dewey, whose ideas, he argues, can be fruitfully applied to a renewal of African American (...)
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  6. Leonard Harris (2004). The Great Debate: W. E. B. Du Bois Vs. Alain Locke on the Aesthetic. Philosophia Africana 7 (1):15-39.
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  7. Robin James (2011). &Quot;these.Are.The Breaks&Quot;: Rethinking "Disagreement" Through Hip Hop. Transformations (19).
    In this paper, I argue that it is productive to read Rancière’s theory of political practice – what he calls “disagreement” – with and against Kodwo Eshun’s theorization of hip hop. Thinking disagreement through hip hop helps flesh out how, exactly, disagreement works, particularly at the level of individual embodiment and consciousness. While Rancière himself gives us many examples of interruptions to the political body (the demos speaking, Jean Derion asserting the non-universality of “universal” man, etc.), I am interested in (...)
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  8. Richard A. Jones (2009). The Politics of Black Fictive Space. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):391-418.
    Historically, for Black writers, literary fiction has been a site for transforming the discursive disciplinary spaces of political oppression. From 19th century “slave narratives” to the 20th century, Black novelists have created an impressive literary counter-canon in advancing liberatory struggles. W.E.B. Du Bois argued that “all art is political.” Many Black writers have used fiction to create spaces for political and social freedom—from the early work of Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black (1859)—to (...)
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African-American Philosophy: Health Care Ethics
  1. Edward J. Blum (2004). The Soul of W. E. B. Du Bois. Philosophia Africana 7 (2):1-16.
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  2. Annette Dula (1994). African American Suspicion of the Healthcare System Is Justified: What Do We Do About It? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):347-.
  3. Annette Dula, Charmaine Royal, Marian Gray Secundy & Steven Miles (2003). The Ethical and Social Implications of Exploring African American Genealogies. Developing World Bioethics 3 (2):133-141.
    In June 2002, the University of Minnesota hosted a conference to explore the implications of using genetic technologies and genealog.
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  4. Kathryn L. Moseley & David B. Kershaw (2012). African American and White Disparities in Pediatric Kidney Transplantation in the United States. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):353-365.
  5. Catherine Myser (2003). Differences From Somewhere: The Normativity of Whiteness in Bioethics in the United States. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):1 – 11.
    I argue that there has been inadequate attention to and questioning of the dominance and <span class='Hi'>normativity</span> of whiteness in the cultural construction of bioethics in the United States. Therefore we risk reproducing white privilege and white supremacy in its theory, method, and practices. To make my argument, I define whiteness and trace its broader social and legal history in the United States. I then begin to mark whiteness in U.S. bioethics, recasting Renee Fox's sociological marking of its American-ness as (...)
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Afrocentrism
  1. Shelley M. Park & Cheryl Green (2000). The Transracial Adoption of Ethnic Minority Children: Questions Regarding Legal and Scientific Interpretations of a Child’s Best Interests. Adoption Quarterly 3 (2):5-34.
    This paper examines a variety of social scientific studies purporting to demonstrate that transracial adoption is in the best interests of children. Finding flaws in these studies and the ethical and political arguments based upon such scientific findings, we argue for adoption practices and policies that respect the racial and ethnic identities of children of color and their communities of origin.
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  2. Ferguson I. I. Stephen C. (2011). The Utopian Worldview of Afrocentricity: Critical Comments on a Reactionary Philosophy. Socialism and Democracy 25 (1):108-134.
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Culture and African-American Philosophy
  1. Philip Alperson (ed.) (2002). Diversity and Community: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Blackwell Pub..
    Throughout, the volume deals with issues confronting many diverse communities including African, African-American, Asian-American, Native American, Latin ...
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  2. Derrick P. Alridge (1999). Conceptualizing a du Boisian Philosophy of Education: Toward a Model for African-American Education. Educational Theory 49 (3):359-379.
  3. M. K. Asante (1998). The African American as African. Diogenes 46 (184):39-50.
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