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  1. Sara Ahmed (2003). Feminist Futures. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
  2. Rita Alfonso & Jo Trigilio (1997). Surfing the Third Wave: A Dialogue Between Two Third Wave Feminists. Hypatia 12 (3):7-16.
    As third wave feminist philosophers attending graduate schools in different parts of the country, we decided to use our e-mail discussion as the format for presenting our thinking on the subject of third wave feminism. Our dialogue takes us through the subjects of postmodernism, the relationship between theory and practice, the generation gap, and the power relations associated with feminist philosophy as an established part of the academy.
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  3. Jeffner Allen (1984). Women and Food. Journal of Social Philosophy 15 (2):34-41.
  4. Jami L. Anderson (2008). Hegel Knits. APA Newsletter of Feminism and Philosophy.
    Although typical arguments for knitting are that it is useful, therapeutic or the latest trend, I argue that knitting can play a life-changing part in the creation of a person’s self. Knitting can be a genuinely powerful activity, one worthy of respect and admiration.
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  5. Louise Antony (2012). Different Voices or Perfect Storm: Why Are There So Few Women in Philosophy? Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):227-255.
  6. Susan Babbitt (2003). Book Review: Martine Watson Brown Ley and Allison B. Kimmich. Women and Autobiography. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):215-218.
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  7. Alison Bailey (1998). Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a View of Privilege-Cognizant White Character. Hypatia 13 (3):27 - 42.
    I address the problem of how to locate "traitorous" subjects, or those who belong to dominant groups yet resist the usual assumptions and practices of those groups. I argue that Sandra Harding's description of traitors as insiders, who "become marginal" is misleading. Crafting a distinction between "privilege-cognizant" and "privilege-evasive" white scripts, I offer an alternative account of race traitors as privilege-cognizant whites who refuse to animate expected whitely scripts, and who are unfaithful to worldviews whites are expected to hold.
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  8. Alison Bailey (1995). Mothering, Diversity and Peace: Comments on Sara Ruddick's Feminist Maternal Peace Politics. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):162-182.
    Sara Ruddick's contemporary philosophical account of mothering reconsiders the maternal arguments used in the women's peace movements of the earlier part of this century. The culmination of this project is her 1989 book, Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace. Ruddick's project is ground-breaking work in both academic philosophy and feminist theory. -/- In this chapter, I first look at the relationship between the two basic components of Ruddick's argument in Maternal Thinking: the "practicalist conception of truth" (PCT) and feminist (...)
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  9. Alison Bailey & Chris Cuomo (2008). The Feminist Philosophy Reader. McGraw Hill.
    The most comprehensive anthology of feminist philosophy available, this first edition reader brings together over 55 of the most influential and time-tested works to have been published in the field of feminist philosophy. Featuring perspectives from across the philosophical spectrum, and from an array of different cultural vantage points, it displays the incredible range, diversity, and depth of feminist writing on fundamental issues, from the early second wave to the present.
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  10. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2).
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  11. Victoria Bates (2012). 'Misery Loves Company': Sexual Trauma, Psychoanalysis and the Market for Misery. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):61-81.
    This article examines sexual ‘misery memoirs’, focusing on author/reader and genre/market relationships in the context of models of trauma and child sexual abuse. It shows that the success of sexual ‘misery memoirs’ is inextricably bound up with the popular dissemination of a feminist-psychoanalytic model of traumatic memory that has taken place since the 1970s. It also argues that, as the ‘truth’ of recovered and traumatic memories has been fundamental to its success, anxieties about false memory and hoax ‘misery memoirs’ have (...)
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  12. Nora Kizer Bell (1989). Women and AIDS: Too Little, Too Late? Hypatia 4 (3):3 - 22.
    Many authors examine the governmental, the scientific, and the sexual politics of AIDS. Many of these same authors tell the AIDS story within the context of decrying homophobia. The implications of that story, however, have a troubling significance for women. This essay proposes to move the discussion of the sexual politics of AIDS beyond the confines of homophobia and to highlight issues not widely discussed outside of AIDS activist circles-issues which are having, and will continue to have, profound effects on (...)
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  13. Memo Bergmann (1986). How Many Feminists Does It Take To Make A Joke? Sexist Humor and What's Wrong With It. Hypatia 1 (1):63-82.
  14. Robyn Bluhm (2013). Self‐Fulfilling Prophecies: The Influence of Gender Stereotypes on Functional Neuroimaging Research on Emotion. Hypatia 28 (4):870-886.
    Feminist scholars have shown that research on sex/gender differences in the brain is often used to support gender stereotypes. Scientists use a variety of methodological and interpretive strategies to make their results consistent with these stereotypes. In this paper, I analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research that examines differences between women and men in brain activity associated with emotion and show that these researchers go to great lengths to make their results consistent with the view that women are more (...)
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  15. Claudia Card (2003). Anita M. Superson and Ann E. Cudd, Eds., Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism:Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism. [REVIEW] Ethics 114 (1):193-195.
  16. R. Alta Charo (1995). Book Review: Women's Health and Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):195-198.
  17. Lorraine Code (2011). A New Epistemology of Rape? Philosophical Papers 38 (3):327-345.
    In this essay I take issue with entrenched conceptions of individual autonomy for how they block understandings of the implications of rape in patriarchal cultures both 'at home' and in situations of armed conflict. I focus on human vulnerability as it manifests in sedimented assumptions about violence against women as endemic to male-female relations, thwarting possibilities of knowing the specific harms particular acts of rape enact well enough to render intelligible their far-reaching social-political-moral implications. Taking my point of departure from (...)
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  18. Krista Cowman & Louise A. Jackson (2003). Time. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
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  19. Sharon Crasnow (2007). Review of Iddo Landau, Is Philosophy Androcentric?. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).
    of Iddo Landau, (from Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews).
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  20. Sharon Crasnow & Joanne Waugh (eds.) (2012). Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    The eight essays contained in Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture explore the portrayal of women and various philosophical responses to that portrayal in contemporary post-civil rights society. The essays examine visual, print, and performance media — stand-up comedy, movies, television, and a blockbuster trilogy of novel. These philosophical feminist analyses of popular culture consider the possibilities, both positive and negative, that popular culture presents for articulating the structure of the social and cultural practices in which gender matters, and for changing (...)
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  21. Victoria Davion (1988). Competition, Recognition, and Approval-Seeking. Hypatia 3 (2):165 - 166.
    Here I support my position in "Do Good Feminists Compete?" against the suggestion that competing with others weakens rather than strengthens one's sense of self.
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  22. Victoria Davion (1987). Do Good Feminists Compete? Hypatia 2 (2):55 - 63.
    In this paper I argue against the view widely held among feminists that nurturing and competition are incompatible. I also explore the following two more specific objections against competition: (1) competitions are "mini-wars" which encourage hatred; (2) while not "mini-wars," competitions foster a war-like mentality. Underlying these objections is the fear that too strong a sense of self makes war likely by severing connection with others. I argue that because patriarchy encourages women to have too little sense of self, some (...)
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  23. Robbin Derry (1997). Feminism. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:11-29.
  24. Nigel Desouza (2005). Book Review: Sabine Doy, Marion Heinz, and Friederike Kuster. Philosophische Geschlechtertheorien: Ausgewhlte Texte Von der Antike Bis Zur Gegenwart. Stuttgart: Reclam, 2002. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):188-193.
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  25. Tom Digby (1998). Do Feminists Hate Men?: Feminism, Antifeminism, and Gender Oppositionality. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (2):15-31.
  26. Dawn R. Elm (1997). Feminism in Business Ethics. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:139-143.
  27. M. Carmela Epright (2004). Honoring Feminism's Past, Approaching on Embodied Future. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):105-107.
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  28. Gertrude Ezorsky (1977). Hiring Women Faculty. Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (1):82-91.
  29. Linda Fisher (1990). Feminist Theory and the Politics of Inclusion. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):174-183.
  30. Linda Rennie Forcey (1997). Situating Feminism. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):109-111.
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  31. Rico Franses (2000). Introduction to "Iconic Space and the Rule of Lands," by Marie-José Mondzain. Hypatia 15 (4):55-57.
    : This introduction highlights two of Mondzain's contributions in the chapter reproduced here, "Iconic Space and the Rule of Lands." The first is her discussion of a link between images and power, which stresses the formal characteristics of paintings rather than their narratives. The second is her examination of the specific task which representation is called on to perform in religious as opposed to secular contexts, where spiritual, otherworldly figures are given physical shape and form.
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  32. Marilyn Friedman (1991). DOES SOMMERS LIKE WOMEN?: MORE ON LIBERALISM, GENDER HIERARCHY, AND SCARLETT O'HARA. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):75-90.
  33. Robert K. Fullinwider (1998). Contested Commodities: The Trouble with Trade in Sex, Children, Body Parts, and Other Things Margaret Jane Radin Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996, Xiv + 279 Pp., $35.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 37 (04):855-.
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  34. Karen Green (2013). Women's Writing and the Early Modern Genre Wars. Hypatia 28 (3):499-515.
    This paper explores two phases of the early modern genre wars. The first was fought by Marie de Gournay, in her “Preface” to Montaigne's Essays, on behalf of her adoptive father and in defense of his naked and masculine prose. The second was fought half a century later by Nicholas Boileau in opposition to Gournay's feminizing successor, Madeleine de Scudéry. In this debate Gournay's position is egalitarian, whereas Scudéry's approximates to a feminism of difference. It is claimed that both female (...)
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  35. Susan Haack (2008). After My Own Heart: Dorothy Sayers' Feminism. Think 7 (19):23-33.
    Dorothy Sayers' Gaudy Night, published in 1936, explores still-topical questions about the relation of epistemological and ethical values, and about the place of women in the life of the mind. In her wry reflections on the radical differences between today's feminist philosophy and Sayers' no-nonsense observation that Susan Haack draws both on this detective story and on Sayers' wonderfully brisk essay.
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  36. Pamela Courtenay Hall (1993). From Justified Discrimination to Responsive Hiring: The Role Model Argument and Female Equity Hiring in Philosophy. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):23-45.
  37. Maurice Hamington (2012). Gender and International Security: Feminist Perspectives. Edited by Laura Sjoberg. The European Legacy 17 (4):543 - 545.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 4, Page 543-545, July 2012.
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  38. Maurice Hamington (2002). Book Review: Isaac D. Balbus. Emotional Rescue: The Theory and Practice of a Feminist Father. New York: Routledge, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):279-283.
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  39. Rebecca Roman Hanrahan & Louise M. Antony (2005). Because I Said So: Toward a Feminist Theory of Authority. Hypatia 20 (4):59-79.
    : Feminism is an antiauthoritarian movement that has sought to unmask many traditional "authorities" as ungrounded. Given this, it might seem as if feminists are required to abandon the concept of authority altogether. But, we argue, the exercise of authority enables us to coordinate our efforts to achieve larger social goods and, hence, should be preserved. Instead, what is needed and what we provide for here is a way to distinguish legitimate authority from objectionable authoritarianism.
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  40. Clare Hemmings (2011). Why Stories Matter: The Political Grammar of Feminist Theory. Duke University Press.
    Progress -- Loss -- Return -- Amenability -- Citation tactics -- Affective subjects.
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  41. Nancy J. Hirschmann (1998). Western Feminism, Eastern Veiling, and the Question of Free Agency. Constellations 5 (3):345-368.
  42. Steven Horwitz (1995). Feminist Economics: An Austrian Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (2):259-280.
    This paper attempts to assess the recent literature on feminist economics from the perspective of modern Austrian economics. Feminists and Austrians share many epistemological and methodological criticisms of neoclassical theory, although Austrians have never linked those criticisms to gender. Both groups argue that the attempt to mimic the methods of the natural sciences has been a particular source of trouble for neoclassicism. The paper suggests that these common points of criticism can serve as a starting point for dialogue between the (...)
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  43. John C. Hughes & Larry May (1980). Sexual Harassment. Social Theory and Practice 6 (3):249-280.
  44. Tracy Isaacs (2002). Feminism and Agency. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (Supplement):129-154.
  45. Louise C. Johnson (2000). Placebound: Australian Feminist Geographies. Oxford University Press.
    This book examines Australian spaces in feminist terms. Each chapter uses a different key feminist theoretical framework--liberal, socialist, radical, postmodern, and postcolonial--to generate a range of Australian feminist geographies.
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  46. John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.) (1997). Thresholds in Feminist Geography: Difference, Methodology, and Representation. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  47. Sandra Kemp & Paola Bono (eds.) (1993). The Lonely Mirror: Italian Perspectives on Feminist Theory. Routledge.
    Introduction Without a leg to stand on Sandra Kemp and Paola Bono The project that became The Lonely Mirror had been to edit an international collection of ...
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  48. Tsachi Keren-Paz (2010). Poetic Justice: Why Sex-Slaves Should Be Allowed to Sue Ignorant Clients in Conversion. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (3):307-336.
    In this article I argue that clients who purchase commercial sex from forced prostitutes should be strictly liable in tort towards the sex-slaves. Such an approach is both normatively defensible and doctrinally feasible. As I have argued elsewhere, fairness and equality demand that clients compensate sex-slaves even if one refuses to acknowledge that fault is involved in purchasing sex from a prostitute who might be forced. In this article I argue that such strict liability could be grounded in the tort (...)
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  49. Eva Feder Kittay (2013). The Body as the Place of Care. In Donald A. Landes & Azucena Cruz-Pierre (eds.), Exploring the Work of Edward S. Casey. Bloomsbury Publishing,.
  50. Iddo Landau (1997). Good Women and Bad Men: A Bias in Feminist Research. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (1):141-150.
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