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  1. Jl Abellan (1993). Reflections on the Spanish Understanding of the Word Race, in the Light of the 500th Anniversary of the Discovery of America. Filosoficky Casopis 41 (2):277-288.
  2. Wayne Allen (1999). Eric Voegelin on the Genealogy of Race. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (3):317-337.
  3. Kal Alston (forthcoming). Race Consciousness and the Philosophy of Education. Philosophy of Education.
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  4. Luvell Anderson, Sally Haslanger & Rae Langton (2012). Language and Race. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
  5. Barbara S. Andrew (2000). Beauvoir and The Second Sex: Feminism, Race, and the Origins of Existentialism (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (2):156-160.
  6. Meg Armstrong (1996). "The Effects of Blackness": Gender, Race, and the Sublime in Aesthetic Theories of Burke and Kant. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):213-236.
  7. Alison Bailey (2005). Book Review: Naomi Zack.Women of Color and Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishers, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (1):220-225.
    Naomi Zack’s unique and important collection, Women of Color and Philosophy, brings together for the first time the voices of twelve philosophers who are women of color. She begins with the premise that the work of women of color who do philosophy in academe, but who do not write exclusively on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender, merits a collection of its own. It’s rare that women of color pursue philosophy in academic contexts; Zack counts at most thirty among the (...)
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  8. George Bellis (2000). 3. The White Nun in Rattlebone. Logos 3 (2).
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  9. Bettina Bergo (2013). A Story to Make You Sad: On Alexis Shotwell's Knowing Otherwise: Race, Gender, and Implicit Understanding. Phaenex 8 (1):233-239.
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  10. Walter Block (2011). Review of Easterly's The White Man's Burden. [REVIEW] Libertarian Papers 3.
    William Easterly has a reputation of being a free enterprise oriented economist. Were this not the case, his 2006 book The White Man’s Burden would not have been such a disappointment. In the event, this author misunderstands economic planning; buys into the fallacious notion of the poverty trap ; accepts a positive role for government in development, just as does Easterly’s target, Jeffrey Sachs; calls for state investment in early education; extols the virtues of democracy; attacks the idea of private (...)
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  11. O. K. Bouwsma (1939). On 'This is White'. Philosophical Review 48 (1):71-73.
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  12. Karla C. Holloway (2006). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Accidental Communities: Race, Emergency Medicine, and the Problem of PolyHeme”: The “R” Word: Bioethics and a (Dis)Regard of Race. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):W46-W48.
  13. J. Kameron Carter (2001). Race: A Theological Account. Dissertation, University of Virginia
    Can being, more specifically, black being, be thematized as visible from within the particularity of a given faith tradition, its practices and mode of being in the world? To narrow the question to one specific faith tradition, Christianity: Can blackness be visible within the visibility of the Christian factum---the incarnate God, Jesus of Nazareth? The first two chapters, drawing on the work of Albert J. Raboteau, Charles H. Long, and James H. Cone, show how African American religious scholarship, to varying (...)
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  14. Timothy Chambers (2009). Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 156.
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  15. Timothy Chambers (2009). George Yancy, Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. Radical Philosophy 156:56.
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  16. Speaking Of Civilizations (2002). Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections. In P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.), Philosophy From Africa: A Text with Readings. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Christine Clarke (2010). Fuelling the Machine: Slave Trade and the Industrial Revolution. Constellations 1 (2).
    Some have contested the Industrial Revolution’s status as a climactic event bringing social and political upheaval. However, the abolishment of slavery, the destruction of traditional ways of life, and the rise of class-consciousness confirm the climactic nature of this period. In analyzing the dramatic changes in the social organization of British society, this paper aims to reclaim the title of the Industrial Revolution as just that--revolutionary.
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  18. Alexis Dianda & Robin M. Muller (2014). Further Reading in Philosophy and Race. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 35 (1-2):429-441.
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  19. Frank C. Dukepoo (1998). Commentary on “Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Responses” (F. Jackson). [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):171-180.
  20. R. Austin Freeman (1925). Racial Realities in Europe. The Eugenics Review 17 (1):42.
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  21. Joseph C. Glose (1942). Scientific Aspects of the Race Problem. Thought 17 (1):183-184.
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  22. Michele Goodwin (2008). Review of L. Prograis and E. Pellegrino, Eds., African American Bioethics: Culture, Race, and Identity. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):52-54.
  23. Paul Gormley (2001). Trashing Whiteness: Pulp Fiction, Se7en, Strange Days, and Articulating Affect. Angelaki 6 (1):155 – 171.
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  24. Justin Gosling (1977). Reply to White. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):307 - 314.
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  25. Leonard Harris (2014). Philosophy of Philosophy: Race, Nation, and Religion. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 35 (1-2):369-380.
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  26. Lisa M. Heldke (2004). A du Boisian Proposal for Persistently White Colleges. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):224-238.
  27. Christopher Hom (2008). The Semantics of Racial Epithets. Journal of Philosophy 105 (8):416-440.
    (forthcoming, Journal of Philosophy) - PDF Racial epithets are derogatory expressions, understood to convey contempt toward their targets. But what do they actually mean, if anything? While the prevailing view is that epithets are to be explained pragmatically, I argue that a careful consideration of the data strongly supports a particular semantic theory. I call this view Combinatorial Externalism (CE). CE holds that epithets express complex properties that are determined by the discriminatory practices and stereotypes of their corresponding racist institutions. (...)
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  28. Noel Ignatiev (2003). Whiteness and Class Struggle. Historical Materialism 11 (4):227-235.
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  29. Fatimah Jackson (1998). Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm for (...)
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  30. Jay A. Jacobson & Barbara White (1991). No: Jay A. Jacobson, M.D.(FACP) Barbara White, B.A. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 3 (6):351-353.
  31. Jonathan Michael Kaplan (2010). When Socially Determined Categories Make Biological Realities: Understanding Black/White Health Disparities in the U.S. The Monist 93 (2):281-297.
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  32. John LaFarge (1943). Interracial Justice as a Principle of Order. Modern Schoolman 20 (2):72-77.
  33. M. Lamont & S. Aksartova (2002). Ordinary Cosmopolitanisms: Strategies for Bridging Racial Boundaries Among Working-Class Men. Theory, Culture and Society 19 (4):1-25.
    In contrast to most literature on cosmopolitanism, which focuses on its elite forms, this article analyzes how ordinary people bridge racial boundaries in everyday life. It is based on interviews with 150 non-college-educated white and black workers in the United States and white and North African workers in France. The comparison of the four groups shows how differences in cultural repertoires across national context and structural location shape distinct anti-racist rhetorics. Market-based arguments are salient among American workers, while arguments based (...)
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  34. Joseph Ledit (1948). From White to Red Tsardom. Thought 23 (4):597-604.
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  35. Zeus Leonardo (forthcoming). Critical Pedagogies and Race Theories. Educational Philosophy and Theory.
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  36. Zeus Leonardo (ed.) (2009). Critical Pedagogy and Race. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  37. M. R. Madden (1930). The Coming of the White Man, 1492-1848. Thought 5 (2):316-325.
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  38. I. I. I. McClendon (2004). On the Nature of Whiteness and the Ontology of Race: Toward a Dialectical Materialist Analysis. In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
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  39. John H. McClendon (2004). Philosophy of Language and the African American Experience: Are There Metaphilosophical Implications? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4):305-310.
  40. Mark W. McElroy (2000). Second-Generation KM: A White Paper. Emergence 2 (3):90-100.
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  41. William McGucken (1939). The White Steed and Education. Thought 14 (3):358-364.
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  42. Qudsia Mirza (1999). Patricia Williams: Inflecting Critical Race Theory. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):111-132.
    Critical Race Theory (C.R.T.) has developed out of a deep dissatisfaction that many black legal scholars in the U.S. felt with liberal civil rights discourse, a discourse premised upon the ideals of assimilation, ‘colour-blindness’ and integration. In addition, the emergence of the Critical Legal Studies movement provided Critical Race theorists with an innovative lexicon and practice which allowed them to develop a critique of traditional race analysis and U.S. law. Patricia Williams has played a key role in the formation of (...)
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  43. James W. Nickel (1974). Classification by Race in Compensatory Programs. Ethics 84 (2):146-150.
  44. Osagie Obasogie & David Winickoff (forthcoming). When is the Racial Pharmacy Bad Medicine? Bioethics Forum.
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  45. Joel Olson (2002). Whiteness and the Participation-Inclusion Dilemma. Political Theory 30 (3):384-409.
  46. Goldie Osuri (2008). Beauty and the Bollywood Star : Stories of Skin Colour and Transnational Circulations of Whiteness. In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.
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  47. Lucius Outlaw (2000). Toward a Critical Theory of 'Race'. In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. Oup Oxford.
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  48. Wanda S. Pillow (2007). Searching for Sacajawea: Whitened Reproductions and Endarkened Representations. Hypatia 22 (2):1-19.
    : Pillow's aim is to demonstrate how representations of Sacajawea have shifted in writings about the Lewis and Clark expedition in ways that support manifest destiny and white colonial projects. This essay begins with a general account of Sacajawea. The next section uses two novels (one hundred years apart) to make the case that shifts in the representation of this important historical figure serve similar purposes. There is some attention to white suffragist representations, but the central contrast is between manifest (...)
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  49. Lincoln Reis & Paul Oskar Kristeller (1943). A Reply to Dr. White. Journal of Philosophy 40 (12):319-320.
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  50. Craig A. Saddler (2005). The Impact of Brown on African American Students: A Critical Race Theoretical Perspective. Educational Studies 37 (1):41-55.
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