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  1. Thomas Kingsmill Abbott (1864/1988). Sight and Touch: An Attempt to Disprove the Received (or Berkeleian) Theory of Vision. Garland.
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  2. Diogenes Allen (1969). Tactile and Non-Tactile Awarenesses. Mind 78 (312):567-570.
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  3. David Appelbaum (1988). The Interpenetrating Reality: Bringing The Body To Touch. Lang.
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  4. David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.
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  5. Ferdinand Binkofski, Kathrin Reetz & Annabelle Blangero (2007). Tactile Agnosia and Tactile Apraxia: Cross Talk Between the Action and Perception Streams in the Anterior Intraparietal Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):201-202.
    In the haptic domain, a double dissociation can be proposed on the basis of neurological deficits between tactile information for action, represented by tactile apraxia, and tactile information for perception, represented by tactile agnosia. We suggest that this dissociation comes from different networks, both involving the anterior intraparietal area of the posterior parietal cortex.
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  6. Ned Block (2003). Spatial Perception Via Tactile Sensation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.
    I’m now looking at a soccer ball and a Nintendo Game Cube, and thus am having a perceptual experience of a sphere and a cube. My friend, blind from birth, (who’s helping me with the cleaning) is touching these items, and is thus having a perceptual experience of the same things. Not only are we perceiving the same items, but in doing so we apply the terms ‘sphere’ and ‘cube’, respectively, to them. Are we, in doing so, applying the same, (...)
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  7. Ned Block (2003). Tactile Sensation Via Spatial Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.
  8. Abraham P. Bos (2010). The Soul's Instrument for Touching in Aristotle, on the Soul II 11, 422b34–423a21. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (1):89-102.
    From ancient times Aristotle, On the Soul II 11, 422b34ff. on the perception of touch has remained incomprehensible. We can only start to understand the text when we see that Aristotle, in talking about “the ensouled body” (423a13), means “the soul's instrumental body” and views this as the actual instrument for the perception of touch. The visible body is only an intermediary between the soul-body and the object of touch.
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  9. Tad T. Brunyé, Eliza K. Walters, Tali Ditman, Stephanie A. Gagnon, Caroline R. Mahoney & Holly A. Taylor (2012). The Fabric of Thought: Priming Tactile Properties During Reading Influences Direct Tactile Perception. Cognitive Science 36 (8):1449-1467.
    The present studies examined whether implied tactile properties during language comprehension influence subsequent direct tactile perception, and the specificity of any such effects. Participants read sentences that implicitly conveyed information regarding tactile properties (e.g., Grace tried on a pair of thick corduroy pants while shopping) that were either related or unrelated to fabrics and varied in implied texture (smooth, medium, rough). After reading each sentence, participants then performed an unrelated rating task during which they felt and rated the texture of (...)
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  10. Frédérique De Vignemont & Olivier Massin (forthcoming). Touch. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.
    Since Aristotle, touch has been found especially hard to define. One of the few unchallenged intuition about touch, however, is that tactile awareness entertains some especially close relationship with bodily awareness. This article considers the relation between touch and bodily awareness from two different perspectives: the body template theory and the body map theory. According to the former, touch is defined by the fact that tactile content matches proprioceptive content. We raise some objections against such a bodily definition of touch (...)
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  11. Dr Edmund Montgomery (1885). III. —Space and Touch, I. Mind (38):227-244.
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  12. Dr Edmund Montgomery (1885). III. —Space and Touch, I. Mind (38):227-244.
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  13. Martin Eimer, Angelo Maravita, Jose Van Velzen, Masud Husain & Jon Driver (2002). The Electrophysiology of Tactile Extinction: ERP Correlates of Unconscious Somatosensory Processing. Neuropsychologia 40 (13):2438-2447.
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  14. Matthew Fulkerson (2014). The First Sense: A Philosophical Study of Human Touch. MIT Press.
    It is through touch that we are able to interact directly with the world; it is our primary conduit of both pleasure and pain. Touch may be our most immediate and powerful sense—“the first sense" because of the central role it plays in experience. In this book, Matthew Fulkerson proposes that human touch, despite its functional diversity, is a single, unified sensory modality. Fulkerson offers a philosophical account of touch, reflecting the interests, methods, and approach that define contemporary philosophy; but (...)
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  15. Matthew Fulkerson (2012). Touch Without Touching. Philosophers' Imprint 12 (5).
    In this paper, I argue that in touch, as in vision and audition, we can and often do perceive objects and properties even when we are not in direct or even apparent bodily contact with them. Unlike those senses, however, touch experiences require a special kind of mutually interactive connection between our sensory surfaces and the objects of our experience. I call this constraint the Connection Principle. This view has implications for the proper understanding of touch, and perceptual reference generally. (...)
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  16. Matthew Fulkerson (2011). The Unity of Haptic Touch. Philosophical Psychology 24 (4):493 - 516.
    Haptic touch is an inherently active and exploratory form of perception, involving both coordinated movements and an array of distinct sensory receptors in the skin. For this reason, some have claimed that haptic touch is not a single sense, but rather a multisensory collection of distinct sensory systems. Though this claim is often made, it relies on what I regard as a confused conception of multisensory interaction. In its place, I develop a nuanced hierarchy of multisensory involvement. According to this (...)
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  17. Edouard Gentaz, Yvette Hatwell & Arlette Streri (2001). Constructivist and Ecological Approaches in Tactual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):106-106.
    Constructivist and ecological approaches are also observed in tactile perception studies. The question is whether identification and localization are dissociated in the tactile modality as well, and whether Norman's conception may be generalized to the field of touch. An analogue to blindsight was evidenced in passive touch, but no such dissociation was observed in active touch. A study is in progress in this domain.
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  18. Edouard Gentaz & Yves Rossetti (1999). Is Haptic Perception Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):378-379.
    A further step in Pylyshyn's discontinuity thesis is to examine the penetrability of haptic (tactual-kinesthetic) perception. The study of the perception of orientation and the “oblique effect” (lower performance in oblique orientations than in vertical–horizontal orientations) in the visual and haptic modalities allows this question to be discussed. We suggest that part of the visual process generating the visual oblique effect is cognitively impenetrable, whereas all haptic processes generating the haptic oblique effect are cognitively penetrable.
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  19. Rebecca Steiner Goldner (2011). Touch and Flesh in Aristotle's de Anima. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):435-446.
    In this paper, I argue for the sense of touch as primary in Aristotle’s account of sensation. Touch, as the identifying and inaugurating distinction of sensate beings, is both of utmost importance to Aristotle as well as highly aporetic on his explanation. The issue of touch and the problematic of flesh, in particular, bring us to Merleau-Ponty’s account of flesh as the chiasmic fold and overlap of subject and object, of self and other, and to an incipient and veiled knowledge (...)
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  20. Richard Gray (2013). What Do Our Experiences of Heat and Cold Represent? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):131-151.
    Our experiences of heat and cold are usually thought to represent states of things: their hotness and coldness. I propose a novel account according to which their contents are not states of things but processes, more specifically, the opposite processes of thermal energy being transmitted to and from the body, respectively. I call this account the Heat Exchange Model of heat perception. Having set out the evidence in support of the proposal, I conclude by showing how it provides a new (...)
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  21. Justin A. Harris, Lisa Karlov & Colin W. G. Clifford (2006). Localization of Tactile Stimuli Depends on Conscious Detection. Journal of Neuroscience 26 (3):948-952.
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  22. Bruce Hood (1994). Seeing, Reaching, Touching: The Relations Between Vision and Touch in Infancy. Mind and Language 9 (3):373-376.
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  23. Robert Hopkins (2011). Re-Imagining, Re-Viewing and Re-Touching. In Fiona McPherson (ed.), The senses: classic and contemporary philosophical perspectives. Oxford University Press, Usa. 261.
    One strategy for working out how to individuate the senses is to pursue that task in tandem with that of individuating the sensory imaginings. We can tackle both, at least for the spatial senses of sight and touch, if we appeal to the idea that, while both modes represent their objects perspectivally, different forms of perspective are involved in each. This cannot, however, exhaust the differences between tactual and visual. Tactual experience is tied to bodily awareness as visual is not. (...)
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  24. Robert Hopkins (2004). Painting, Sculpture, Sight, and Touch. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):149-166.
    I raise two questions that bear on the aesthetics of painting and sculpture. First, painting involves perspective, in the sense that everything represented in a painting is represented from a point, or points, within represented space; is sculpture also perspectival? Second, painting is specially linked to vision; is sculpture linked in this way either to vision or to touch? To clarify the link between painting and vision, I describe the perspectival structure of vision. Since this is the same structure we (...)
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  25. Robert Hopkins (2000). Touching Pictures. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):149-167.
    Congenitally blind people can make and understand ‘tactile pictures’ – representations form of raised ridges on flat surfaces. If made visible, these representations can serve as pictures for the sighted. Does it follow that we should take at face value the idea that they are pictures made for touch? I explore this question, and the related issue of the aesthetics of ‘tactile pictures’ by considering the role in both depiction and pictorial aesthetics of experience, and by asking how far the (...)
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  26. C. Korsmeyer (2012). Touch and the Experience of the Genuine. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):365-377.
    Genuineness is an important property of objects that are rare, old, or preserved as memorials. Being genuine enhances economic value for objects such as works of art, and it is obviously critical for historical purposes, such as assessing the artefacts from a past culture. Here I argue that genuineness is also an aesthetic property that delivers an experience of its own. I contend that the sense of touch covertly operates in such experiences, as this sense conveys the impression of being (...)
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  27. Dominic M. M. Lopes (1997). Art Media and the Sense Modalities: Tactile Pictures. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):425-440.
    It is widely assumed that the art media can be individuated with reference to the sense modalities. Different art media are perceived by means of different sense modalities, and this tells us what properties of each medium are aesthetically relevant. The case of pictures appears to fit this principle well, for pictures are deemed purely and paradigmatically visual representations. However, recent psychological studies show that congenitally and early blind people have the ability to interpret and make raised‐line drawings through touch. (...)
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  28. Dominic M. McIver Lopes (2002). Vision, Touch, and the Value of Pictures. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):191-201.
    Since blind people can draw and interpret raised-line drawings, depiction is not an essentially visual medium. Neither is the art of pictures an essentially visual art form. The reasons given for evaluating a picture aesthetically may advert to its tactile qualities insteadof its visual qualities.In particular, a raised-line picture canbe valued for the tactile experience it elicits of the scene it depicts, just as a visual picture is sometimes valuedfor eliciting a visual experience of its subject. The argument for this (...)
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  29. Colin Marshall (forthcoming). Hume Versus the Vulgar on Resistance, Nisus, and the Impression of Power. Philosophical Studies.
    In the first Enquiry, Hume takes the experience of exerting force against a solid body to be a key ingredient of the vulgar idea of power, so that the vulgar take that experience to provide us with an impression of power. Hume provides two arguments against the vulgar on this point: the first concerning our other applications of the idea of power and the second concerning whether that experience yields certainty about distinct events. I argue that, even if we accept (...)
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  30. Michael Martin (1992). Sight and Touch. In Tim Crane (ed.), The Contents of Experience. New York: Cambridge University Press.
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  31. Pascal Massie (2013). Touching, Thinking, Being: The Sense of Touch in Aristotle's De Anima and its Implications. Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17:74-101.
  32. Olivier Massin (2010). L'objectivité du toucher [The Objectivity of the Sense of Touch]. Dissertation, Aix-Marseille
    This thesis vindicates the common-sense intuition that touch is more objective than the other senses. The reason why it is so, it is argued, is that touch is the only sense essential of the experience of physical effort, and that this experience constitutes our only acquaintance with the mind-independence of the physical world. The thesis is divided in tree parts. Part I argues that sensory modalities are individuated by they proper objects, realistically construed. Part II argues that the proper objects (...)
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  33. Olivier Massin & Jean-Maurice Monnoyer (2003). Toucher Et Proprioception. Voir (Barré) 26:48-73.
    Our thesis is that proprioception is not a sixth sense distinct from the sense of touch, but a part of that tactile (or haptic) sense. The tactile sense is defined as the sense whose direct intentional objects are macroscopic mechanical properties. We first argue (against D. Armstrong, 1962; B. O'Shaughnessy 1989, 1995, 1998 and M. Martin, 1992, 1993,1995) that the two following claims are incompatible : (i) proprioception is a sense distinct from touch; (ii) touch is a bipolar modality, that (...)
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  34. Filip Mattens (2009). Perception, Body, and the Sense of Touch: Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 25 (2):97-120.
    In recent philosophy of mind, a series of challenging ideas have appeared about the relation between the body and the sense of touch. In certain respects, these ideas have a striking affinity with Husserl’s theory of the constitution of the body. Nevertheless, these two approaches lead to very different understandings of the role of the body in perception. Either the body is characterized as a perceptual “organ,” or the body is said to function as a “template.” Despite its focus on (...)
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  35. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Introduction to Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. In , Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.
    Perception is the ultimate source of our knowledge about contingent facts. It is an extremely important philosophical development that starting in the last quarter of the twentieth century, philosophers have begun to change how they think of perception. The traditional view of perception focussed on sensory receptors; it has become clear, however, that perceptual systems radically transform the output of these receptors, yielding content concerning objects and events in the external world. Adequate understanding of this process requires that we think (...)
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  36. Fawn M. McNeil-Haber (2004). Ethical Considerations in the Use of Nonerotic Touch in Psychotherapy with Children. Ethics and Behavior 14 (2):123 – 140.
    Although touch frequently occurs in psychotherapy with children, there is little written on the ethical considerations of therapeutic touch. Because physical contact does occur, therapists must consider if, how, and when it is used, for both their clients' safety and their own. In this review, I further develop the issues suggested by Aquino and Lee (2000) in the use of nurturing touch in therapy by considering many types of touch that occur in psychotherapy with children; the possible positive role of (...)
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  37. E. Montgomery (1885). Space and Touch (I). Mind 10 (38):227-44.
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  38. Edmund Montgomery (1885). Space and Touch, I. Mind 10 (38):227-244.
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  39. Edmund Montgomery (1885). Space and Touch, II. Mind 10 (39):377-398.
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  40. Edmund Montgomery (1885). Space and Touch, III. Mind 10 (40):512-531.
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  41. David Morris (2002). Touching Intelligence. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (149-162):149-162.
    Touch requires that one move in concert with one's tactile object. This provokes the question how joint movement of this sort yields perception of tactile qualities of the object vs. tactile qualities of an object-augmented body. Phenomenological analysis together with results of dynamic systems theory (in psychology) suggest that the difference stems from 'resonant' vs. 'reverberant' modalities of body-object movement. The further suggestion is that tactile movement is itself a form of discriminative intelligence, and that the peculiar intimacy of touch (...)
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  42. Brian O'Shaughnessy (1989). The Sense of Touch. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (1):37 – 58.
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  43. Massimiliano Oliveri, Paolo Maria Rossini, Maria M. Filippi, Raimondo Traversa, Paola Cicinelli & Carlo Caltagirone (2002). Specific Forms of Neural Activity Associated with Tactile Space Awareness. Neuroreport 13 (8):997-1001.
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  44. Mark Paterson (2009). The Human Touch. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):50-56.
    Touch is a sense of communication. It is receptive, expressive, can communicate empathy. It can bring distant objects and people into proximity. It is a carnal world, with its pleasures of feeling and being felt, of tasting and touching the textures of flesh and of food. And equally it is a profound world of philosophical verification, of the communication of presence and empathy with others, of the mutual implication or folding of body, flesh and world.
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  45. Mark Paterson (2009). The Human Touch. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):50-56.
    Touch is a sense of communication. It is receptive, expressive, can communicate empathy. It can bring distant objects and people into proximity. It is a carnal world, with its pleasures of feeling and being felt, of tasting and touching the textures of flesh and of food. And equally it is a profound world of philosophical verification, of the communication of presence and empathy with others, of the mutual implication or folding of body, flesh and world.
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  46. H. H. Price (1944). Touch and Organic Sensation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 44:I.
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  47. Matthew Ratcliffe (2012). What is Touch? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (3):413 - 432.
    This paper addresses the nature of touch or ?tactual perception?. I argue that touch encompasses a wide range of perceptual achievements, that treating it as a number of separate senses will not work, and that the permissive conception we are left with is so permissive that it is unclear how touch might be distinguished from the other senses. I conclude that no criteria will succeed in individuating touch. Although I do not rule out the possibility that this also applies to (...)
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  48. Matthew Ratcliffe (2008). Touch and Situatedness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):299 – 322.
    This paper explores the phenomenology of touch and proposes that the structure of touch serves to cast light on the more general way in which we 'find ourselves in a world'. Recent philosophical work on perception tends to emphasize vision. This, I suggest, motivates the imposition of a distinction between externally directed perception of objects and internally directed perception of one's own body. In contrast, the phenomenology of touch involves neither firm boundaries between body and world nor perception of bodily (...)
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  49. Louise Richardson (2013). Bodily Sensation and Tactile Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):134-154.
  50. Norihiro Sadato, Satoru Nakashita & Daisuke N. Saito (2007). Pathways of Tactile-Visual Crossmodal Interaction for Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):218-219.
    There is a task-specificity in the visual-tactile interaction for perception: The polymodal posterior parietal cortex is related to the comparison of the shapes coded by different sensory modalities, whereas the lateral occipital complex is the part of the network for multimodal shape identification. These interactions may be mediated by some latent pathways potentiated by sensory deprivation or learning.
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