This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
8 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Hubert G. Alexander (1971). Transformational Grammar and Aristotelian Logic. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 2 (1/2):57-64.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Emmon Bach, An Extension of Classical Transformational Grammar.
    0. Introductory remarks. I assume that every serious theory of language must give some explicit account of the relationship between expressions in the language described and expressions in some interpreted language which spells out the semantics of the language.1 Let's call this relationship the translation relation. Theories differ as to how this relation is specified. In the Aspects theory of syntax, taken together with a Katz-Postal view of "semantic rules" (Chomsky 1965; Katz and Postal, 1964), it was assumed that (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Malgorzata Haladewicz-Grzelak (2008). An Epistemological Study of Chomsky's Transformational Grammar. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (2):211-246.
    The article traces interpretative mechanisms hidden in Chomsky's Transformational Model. The framework is that of epistemological criticism, investigating the intertwining of interpretation, context and intuition. My hypothesis is that the Transformational Model is an example of a quasi-axiomatic, intuition-based grammar. It is not a scientific model of Competence but a scientistic description of Performance (teleological corpora). The scientistic décor is thus an eristic stratagem to hide arbitrary interpretation. The discussion is empirically substantiated by analyzing the notion of grammaticality, the tectonics (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Paul Kiparsky, Grammaticalization as Optimization.
    According to the neogrammarians and de Saussure, all linguistic change is either sound change, analogy, or borrowing.1 Meillet (1912) identified a class of changes that don’t fit into any of these three categories. Like analogical changes, they are endogenous innovations directly affecting morphology and syntax, but unlike analogical changes, they are not based on any pre-existing patterns in the language. Meillet proposed that they represent a fourth type of change, which he called GRAMMATICALIZATION. Its essential property for him was that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William G. Lycan (1970). Transformational Grammar and the Russell-Strawson Dispute. Metaphilosophy 1 (4):335–337.
  6. Pierre Pica (1992). Projeter-Alpha Ou la Langue Cachée. In Liliane Tasmowksi & Anne Zribi-Hertz (eds.), De la musique à la linguistique. Hommages à Nicolas Ruwet. Communication & Cognition.
    The article shows that the arugument of a verb can be projected in diffrent ways according to the meaning (agentive or not) of the predicate. An analysis is developed which suggests a modification of the projection principle according to which this principle is in part an interpretative principle, not a principle of the core grammmar.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Erik Stenius (1973). Syntax of Symbolic Logic and Transformational Grammar. Synthese 26 (1):57 - 80.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. J. W. Swanson (1969). An Unresolved Problem in Transformational Grammar. Journal of Philosophy 66 (5):124-131.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation