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Trust

Edited by Edward Hinchman (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)
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  1. Igor Abramov (2009). Building Peace in Fragile States — Building Trust is Essential for Effective Public-Private Partnerships. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):481 - 494.
    Increasingly, the private sector is playing a greater role in supporting peace building efforts in conflict and post-conflict areas by providing critical expertise, know-how, and capital. However, reports of the corrupt practices of both governments and businesses have plagued international peace building efforts, deepening the distrust of stricken communities. Businesses are perceived as being selfish and indifferent to the impact their operations may have on the social and political development of local communities. Additionally, the corruption of local governments has been (...)
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  2. Fred Adams (2001). Keith Lehrer, Self‐Trust: A Study of Reason, Knowledge, and Autonomy:Self‐Trust: A Study of Reason, Knowledge, and Autonomy. Ethics 111 (2):427-429.
  3. Jonathan E. Adler (1994). Testimony, Trust, Knowing. Journal of Philosophy 91 (5):264-275.
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  4. James Alm & Benno Torgler (2011). Do Ethics Matter? Tax Compliance and Morality. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):635-651.
    In this article we argue that puzzle of tax compliance can be explained, at least in part, by recognizing the typically neglected role of ethics in individual behavior; that is, individuals do not always behave as the selfish, rational, self-interested individuals portrayed in the standard neoclassical paradigm, but rather are often motivated by many other factors that have as their main foundation some aspects of “ethics.” We argue that it is not possible to understand fully an individual’s compliance decisions without (...)
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  5. Ben Almassi (2009). Trust in Expert Testimony: Eddington's 1919 Eclipse Expedition and the British Response to General Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (1):57-67.
  6. Facundo M. Alonso (forthcoming). What is Reliance? Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    In this article I attempt to provide a conceptual framework for thinking about reliance in a systematic way. I argue that reliance is a cognitive attitude that has a tighter connection to the guidance of our thought and action than ordinary belief does. My main thesis is that reliance has a ?constitutive aim?: namely, it aims at guiding our thought and action in a way that is sensible from the standpoint of practical or theoretical ends. This helps explain why reliance (...)
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  7. Kenneth D. Alpern (1997). What Do We Want Trust to Be? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 16 (1/2/3):29-45.
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  8. Heidrun Åm (2011). Trust as Glue in Nanotechnology Governance Networks. Nanoethics 5 (1):115-128.
    This paper reflects on the change of relations among participants in nanotechnology governance through their participation in governance processes such as stakeholder dialogues. I show that policymaking in practice—that is, the practice of coming and working together in such stakeholder dialogues—has the potential for two-fold performative effects: it can contribute to the development of trust and mutual responsibility on the part of the involved actors, and it may bring about effects on the formation of boundaries of what is sayable and (...)
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  9. Heidrun Åm (2011). Trust as Glue in Nanotechnology Governance Networks. Nanoethics 5 (1):115-128.
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  10. Trond Åm (2011). Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies. Nanoethics 5 (1):15-28.
    Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions (...)
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  11. Jon Aarum Andersen (2005). Trust in Managers: A Study of Why Swedish Subordinates Trust Their Managers. Business Ethics 14 (4):392–404.
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  12. R. I. X. Andreassen & Det Etiske Rod (1990). The Importance of Knowledge and Trust in the Definition of Death. Bioethics 4 (3):232–236.
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  13. Gry Ardal (2010). Self and Other in Trust and Distrust. Judging About Trustworthiness. In Arne Grøn & Claudia Welz (eds.), Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. Mohr Siebeck.
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  14. Antonio Argandoña (1999). Sharing Out in Alliances: Trust and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 21 (2-3):217 - 228.
    Alliances are relatively new forms of relationships between businesses which allow cooperation in some areas of activity while maintaining competition in others, even in those areas where cooperation is the established procedure. Logically, this demands a mutual trust on the basis of which the cooperation can be established. The nature of this relationship is, furthermore, dynamic inasmuch as it develops over a period of time and generates new conditions which either enhance or destroy trust.This article reviews the general issues of (...)
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  15. Semra F. Aşcıgil & Aslı B. Parlakgümüş (2012). Ethical Work Climate as an Antecedent of Trust in Co-Workers. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (3-4):399-417.
    This study aims to enhance the understanding about the influence of perceived ethical work climate dimensions on employees’ trust in co-workers. The instrument used was Victor and Cullen’s (1988) questionnaire containing five empirically derived types of ethical climate (caring, law and code, rules, instrumentalism, and independence). As hypothesized, the study revealed that the instrumental ethical climate dimension was negatively related, and independent climate was positively related to co-worker trust. Thus, two ethical climate dimensions (independent and instrumental) account for the 22.7 (...)
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  16. Richard Ashcroft (2009). The Psychology of Repugnance and the Duty to Trust. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):51-52.
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  17. Richard E. Ashcroft (2003). Kant, Mill, Durkheim? Trust and Autonomy in Bioethics and Politics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):359-366.
  18. Kim Atkins (2002). Friendship, Trust and Forgiveness. Philosophia 29 (1-4):111-132.
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  19. R. F. Atkinson (1959). Facts and Obligations. By Dorothy Emmet. (Published by Dr. Williams' Trust, London, 1958. Pp. 20. Price 3s. 6d.). Philosophy 34 (130):275-.
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  20. Robert Audi (2008). Some Dimensions of Trust in Business Practices: From Financial and Product Representation to Licensure and Voting. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):97 - 102.
    This paper is an examination of the role of trust in the previous seven papers in this issue of the Journal. Trust and trustworthiness are briefly characterized; their importance in business itself and in business ethics is briefly described; and each paper is discussed in relation to how trust figures in the ethical issues it raises. The overall discussion brings out the need for further work on the nature of trust and on the elements in business, such as transparency, that (...)
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  21. Angela Ayios (2003). Competence and Trust Guardians as Key Elements of Building Trust in East-West Joint Ventures in Russia. Business Ethics 12 (2):190–202.
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  22. A. Azmanova (2011). Against the Politics of Fear: On Deliberation, Inclusion and the Political Economy of Trust. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):401-412.
    This is an inquiry into the economic psychology of trust: that is, what model of the political economy of complex liberal democracies is conducive to attitudes that allow difference to be perceived in the terms of ‘significant other’, rather than as a menacing or an irrelevant stranger. As a test case of prevailing perceptions of otherness in European societies, I examine attitudes towards Turkey’s accession to the European Union.
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  23. Annette Baier (2010). Reflections On How We Live. OUP Oxford.
    The pioneering moral philosopher Annette Baier presents a series of new and recent essays in ethics, broadly conceived to include both engagements with other philosophers and personal meditations on life. Baier's unique voice and insight illuminate a wide range of topics. In the public sphere, she enquires into patriotism, what we owe future people, and what toleration we should have for killing. In the private sphere, she discusses honesty, self-knowledge, hope, sympathy, and self-trust, and offers personal reflections on faces, friendship, (...)
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  24. Annette Baier (1986). Trust and Antitrust. Ethics 96 (2):231-260.
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  25. Annette C. Baier (2007). Trust, Suffering, and the Aesculapian Virtues. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press. 136--153.
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  26. J. Baker (2003). Intellectual Trust in Oneself and Others. Philosophical Review 112 (4):586-589.
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  27. Judith Baker (2003). Intellectual Trust in Oneself and Others. Philosophical Review 112 (4):586-589.
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  28. Judith Baker (2000). Martin Hollis, Trust Within Reason:Trust Within Reason. Ethics 110 (2):418-421.
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  29. Reviewed by Judith Baker (2000). Martin Hollis, Trust Within Reason. Ethics 110 (2).
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  30. I. Bamforth (2000). Kafka's Uncle: Scenes From a World of Trust Infected by Suspicion. Medical Humanities 26 (2):85-91.
    What happens when we heed a call? Few writers have been as suspicious of their vocation as Franz Kafka (1883–1924). His story, A Country Doctor, (1919) ostensibly about a night visit to a patient that goes badly wrong, suggests a modern writer's journey to the heart of his work. There he discovers that trust, like the tradition which might sustain him, is blighted. This essay also examines Kafka's attitude to illness and the medical profession, and his close relationship with his (...)
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  31. Michael Baurmann & Geoffrey Brennan (2009). What Should the Voter Know? Epistemic Trust in Democracy. Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):159-186.
    Alvin Goldman develops the concept of “core voter knowledge” to capture the kind of knowledge that voters need to have in order that democracy function successfully. As democracy is supposed to promote the people's goals, core voter knowledge must, according to Goldman, first and foremost answer the question which electoral candidate would successfully perform in achieving that voter's ends. In our paper we challenge this concept of core voter knowledge from different angles. We analyse the dimensions of political trustworthiness and (...)
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  32. Paolo Becchi & Lorenzo Scillitani (eds.) (2012). Fiducia E Sicurezza: Un Confronto Plurisciplinare. Rubbettino.
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  33. Lawrence C. Becker (2000). Social Trust and Human Communities. [REVIEW] Dialogue 39 (01):173-.
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  34. Lawrence C. Becker (1996). Trust as Noncognitive Security About Motives. Ethics 107 (1):43-61.
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  35. Geoffrey G. Bell, Robert J. Oppenheimer & Andre Bastien (2002). Trust Deterioration in an International Buyer-Supplier Relationship. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):65 - 78.
    Despite an abundance of research on inter-organizational trust, researchers are only beginning to understand the process of trust deterioration as an inter-organizational phenomenon. This paper presents a case study examining the deteriorating relationship between two international high-tech firms. We surveyed respondents from the supplier firm to identify major elements that reduced the supplier's trust in its customer, using the dimensions of trust identified by Mayer et al. (1995). While violations of ability, integrity, and benevolence all contributed to trust reduction, early (...)
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  36. Richard Bellingham (2003). Ethical Leadership: Rebuilding Trust in Corporations. Hrd Press.
    Creating an ethical culture -- Winning through people -- Winning with customers -- Winning for the community -- Action steps and strategies -- Summary -- Appendix A: An ETHICS evaluation tool: ethics assessment and goal-setting -- Appendix B: Debate and guidance: the literature and best practices.
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  37. Matthew A. Benton (forthcoming). Believing on Authority. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    Linda Zagzebski's "Epistemic Authority" (Oxford University Press, 2012) brings together issues in social epistemology with topics in moral and political philosophy as well as philosophy of religion. In this paper I criticize her discussion of self-trust and rationality, which sets up the main argument of the book; I consider how her view of authority relates to some issues of epistemic authority in testimony; and I raise some concerns about her treatment of religious epistemology and religious authority in particular.
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  38. Gary Bergel (1997). What Have We Learned About Trust From Recent Experiences with Teaming and Empowerment? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 16 (1/2/3):205-210.
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  39. Anna Bernasek (2010). The Economics of Integrity: From Dairy Farmers to Toyota, How Wealth is Built on Trust and What That Means for Our Future. Harperstudio.
    In this "New Era of Responsibility," Bernasek's message is both essential and urgent. The Economics of Integrity is a book for our times.
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  40. C. Bicchieri, E. Xiao & R. Muldoon (2011). Trustworthiness is a Social Norm, but Trusting is Not. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (2):170-187.
    Previous literature has demonstrated the important role that trust plays in developing and maintaining well-functioning societies. However, if we are to learn how to increase levels of trust in society, we must first understand why people choose to trust others. One potential answer to this is that people view trust as normative: there is a social norm for trusting that imposes punishment for noncompliance. To test this, we report data from a survey with salient rewards to elicit people’s attitudes regarding (...)
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  41. Cristina Bicchieri, John Duffy & and Gil Tolle (2004). Trust Among Strangers. Philosophy of Science 71 (3):286-319.
    The paper presents a simulation of the dynamics of impersonal trust. It shows how a "trust and reciprocate" norm can emerge and stabilize in populations of conditional cooperators. The norm, or behavioral regularity, is not to be identified with a single strategy. It is instead supported by several conditional strategies that vary in the frequency and intensity of sanctions.
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  42. Cristina Bicchieri, Azi Lev-On & Alex Chavez (2010). The Medium or the Message? Communication Relevance and Richness in Trust Games. Synthese 176 (1):125 - 147.
    Subjects communicated prior to playing trust games; the richness of the communication media and the topics of conversation were manipulated. Communication richness failed to produce significant differences in first-mover investments. However, the topics of conversation made a significant difference: the amounts sent were considerably higher in the unrestricted communication conditions than in the restricted communication and no-communication conditions. Most importantly, we find that first-movers' expectations of second-movers' reciprocation are influenced by communication and strongly predict their levels of investment.
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  43. Cristina Bicchieri, Ram Mudambi & Pietro Navarra (2005). A Matter of Trust: The Search for Accountability in Italian Politics, 1990–2000. Mind and Society 4 (1):129-148.
    During the Nineties Italian politics underwent major changes. Following the uncovering of systemic corruption, the current political establishment was wiped out. The system of representation at both the national and local level underwent a significant transformation that improved voters’ control over their elected representatives. We argue that both events were the consequence of citizens’ demand for greater accountability of public officers. We model the relationship between voters and politicians as a repeated Trust game. In such game, cooperation can be attained (...)
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  44. Stephanie J. Bird & David E. Housman (1995). Trust and the Collection, Selection, Analysis and Interpretation of Data: A Scientist's View. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (4):371-382.
    Trust is a critical component of research: trust in the work of co-workers and colleagues within the scientific community; trust in the work of research scientists by the non-research community. A wide range of factors, including internally and externally generated pressures and practical and personal limitations, affect the research process. The extent to which these factors are understood and appreciated influence the development of trust in scientific research findings.
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  45. Robert L. Birmingham (1969). The Prisoner's Dilemma and Mutual Trust: Comment. Ethics 79 (2):156-158.
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  46. Nicole Bishop (1996). Trust is Not Enough: Classroom Self-Disclosure and the Loss of Private Lives. Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (3):429–439.
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  47. Keith Blois (2003). Is It Commercially Irresponsible to Trust? Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):183 - 193.
    This paper considers a recent U.K. legal dispute where a supplier sued a large organization, which had been a long-term customer, for breach of implied contract. It uses this case to discuss aspects of the nature of trust between organizations. The discussion encompasses a consideration of the distinction between trust and reliability; and, why the concept of blanket trust is not helpful. In conclusion, by contrasting business-to-business and personal relationships, the paper suggests that firms in their relationships with other institutions (...)
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  48. Louis H. Bluhm (1987). Trust, Terrorism, and Technology. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):333 - 341.
    The development of civilization implies an evolution of complex trust mechanisms which integrate the social system and form bonds which allow individuals to interact, even if they are strangers. Key elements of trust are predictability of consequences and an evaluation of consequences in terms of self-interest or values. Values, ethics, and norms enhance predictability. The terrorist introduces an unpredictable event which has negative consequences, thus destroying trust. However, terrorist-like situations occur in day-to-day activities. Technology itself makes the world more interdependent (...)
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  49. Friedel Bolle (1998). Rewarding Trust: An Experimental Study. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 45 (1):83-98.
    The issue of trust has recently attracted growing attention in research on work relations, capital – owner relations, cultural influences on the economic structures of different countries, and other topics. This paper analyzes a simple experiment on trust and the reward of trust. Mr A is endowed with DM 80. He decides to trust Ms B (and give her his money) or not. Ms B is able to double the sum of money (if she gets it) and can then decide (...)
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  50. Jonathan Bolton (2000). Trust and the Healing Encounter: An Examination of an Unorthodox Healing Performance. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (4):305-319.
    Just why a patient should trust a particular healer isa question that has not been adequately explored inthe literature on healing. This ethnographiccase-report examines the healing performance of achiropractor and proposes that it contains fourintrinsic claims to trustworthiness: he claims to bea qualified and sincere healer who is inpossession of knowledge and techniques that derivetheir power from their truth content and whichempower him to make beneficial changes in thepatient. Taking each claim in turn I described thenature of the claim, how (...)
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