This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
1588 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 1588
Material to categorize
  1. Francisco Aboitiz, Javier López-Calderón & Vladimir López (2007). The Mesencephalon as a Source of Preattentive Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):81-82.
    By themselves, mesencephalic subcortical mechanisms provide a preattentive kind of consciousness, related to stimulus-related, short-latency dopamine release triggered by collicular input. Elaborate forms of consciousness, containing identifiable objects (visual, auditory, tactile, or chemical), imply longer-lasting phenomena that depend on the activation of prosencephalic networks. Nevertheless, the maintenance of these higher-level networks strongly depends on long-lasting mesencephalic dopamine release. (Published Online May 1 2007).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Thanks for the Memories: Extending the Hippocampal-Diencephalic Mnemonic System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):471-479.
    The goal of our target article was to review a number of emerging facts about the effects of limbic damage on memory in humans and animals, and about divisions within recognition memory in humans. We then argued that this information can be synthesized to produce a new view of the substrates of episodic memory. The key pathway in this system is from the hippocampus to the anterior thalamic nuclei. There seems to be a general agreement that the importance of this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thorsten Albrecht, Susan Klapötke & Uwe Mattler (2010). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking Are Enhanced by Perceptual Learning. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):656-666.
  4. M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier, J. H. Fallon & S. J. Barker (1996). PET Imaging of Conscious and Unconscious Verbal Memory. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):448-62.
  5. Jackie Andrade, Rajesh Munglani, J. Gareth Jones & Alan D. Baddeley (1994). Cognitive Performance During Anesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (2):148-165.
  6. John Antrobus, Toshiaki Kondo, Ruth Reinsel & George Fein (1995). Dreaming in the Late Morning: Summation of REM and Diurnal Cortical Activation. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (3):275-299.
  7. Eoghan Mac Aogáin (1998). Imitation Without Attitudes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):696-697.
    Byrne & Russon's account of program imitation in primates involves propositional attitudes (expectations and goals), which limits its falsifiability. Yet their account of priming shows exactly how imitation without attitudes would look. The challenge is to upgrade the notion of priming to give an account of low-level program imitation without invoking propositional attitudes.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Michael A. Arbib & Peter Érdi (2000). Organizing the Brain's Diversities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):551-565.
    We clarify the arguments in Neural organization: Structure, function, and dynamics, acknowledge important contributions cited by our critics, and respond to their criticisms by charting directions for further development of our integrated approach to theoretical and empirical studies of neural organization. We first discuss functional organization in general (behavior versus cognitive functioning, the need to study body and brain together, function in ontogeny and phylogeny) and then focus on schema theory (noting that schema theory is not just a top-down theory (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Adam Arico, Brian Fiala, Robert F. Goldberg & Shaun Nichols (2011). The Folk Psychology of Consciousness. Mind and Language 26 (3):327-352.
    This paper proposes the ‘AGENCY model’ of conscious state attribution, according to which an entity's displaying certain relatively simple features (e.g. eyes, distinctive motions, interactive behavior) automatically triggers a disposition to attribute conscious states to that entity. To test the model's predictions, participants completed a speeded object/attribution task, in which they responded positively or negatively to attributions of mental properties (including conscious and non-conscious states) to different sorts of entities (insects, plants, artifacts, etc.). As predicted, participants responded positively to conscious (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Arp (2005). Scenario Visualization: One Explanation of Creative Problem Solving. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (3):31-60.
    In this paper, I first present the ideas and arguments put forward by evolutionary psychologists that humans evolved certain capacities to creatively problem solve. Specifically, Steven Mithen thinks that creative problem solving is possible because the mind has evolved a conscious capacity he calls cognitive fluidity, the flexible exchange of information between and among mental modules. While I agree with Mithen that cognitive fluidity acts as a necessary condition for creative problem solving, I disagree that cognitive fluidity alone will suffice (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Bernard J. Baars (1996). When Are Images Conscious? The Curious Disconnection Between Imagery and Consciousness in the Scientific Literature. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):261-264.
  12. Elisabeth Bacon, Nathalie Huet & Jean-Marie Danion (2011). Metamemory Knowledge and Beliefs in Patients with Schizophrenia and How These Relate to Objective Cognitive Abilities. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1315-1326.
  13. Alan Baddeley (2007). Working Memory, Thought, and Action. OUP Oxford.
    'Working Memory, Thought, and Action' is the magnum opus of one of the most influential cognitive psychologists of the past 50 years. This new volume on the model he created (with Graham Hitch) discusses the developments that have occurred within the model in the past twenty years, and places it within a broader context. -/- Working memory is a temporary storage system that underpins our capacity for coherent thought. Some 30 years ago, Baddeley and Hitch proposed a way of thinking (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Frank Baeyens, Debora Vansteenwegen & Dirk Hermans (2009). Associative Learning Requires Associations, Not Propositions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):198-199.
    We discuss findings on evaluative conditioning (EC) that are problematic for the account of learning, namely, dissociations between conscious beliefs and acquired (dis)liking. We next argue that, both for EC and for Pavlovian learning in general, conditioned responding cannot rationally be inferred from propositional knowledge type and that, therefore, performance cannot be explained.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. A. G. Baker, Irina Baetu & Robin A. Murphy (2009). Propositional Learning is a Useful Research Heuristic but It is Not a Theoretical Algorithm. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):199-200.
    Mitchell et al.'s claim, that their propositional theory is a single-process theory, is illusory because they relegate some learning to a secondary memory process. This renders the single-process theory untestable. The propositional account is not a process theory of learning, but rather, a heuristic that has led to interesting research.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Dana H. Ballard, Mary M. Hayhoe, Polly K. Pook & Rajesh P. N. Rao (1997). Pointing the Way. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):758-763.
    The majority of commentators agree that the time to focus on embodiment has arrived and that the disembodied approach that was taken from the birth of artificial intelligence is unlikely to provide a satisfactory account of the special features of human intelligence. In our Response, we begin by addressing the general comments and criticisms directed at the emerging enterprise of deictic and embodied cognition. In subsequent sections we examine the topics that constitute the core of the commentaries: embodiment mechanisms, dorsal (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Horace Barlow (2001). The Exploitation of Regularities in the Environment by the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):602-607.
    Statistical regularities of the environment are important for learning, memory, intelligence, inductive inference, and in fact, for any area of cognitive science where an information-processing brain promotes survival by exploiting them. This has been recognised by many of those interested in cognitive function, starting with Helmholtz, Mach, and Pearson, and continuing through Craik, Tolman, Attneave, and Brunswik. In the current era, many of us have begun to show how neural mechanisms exploit the regular statistical properties of natural images. Shepard proposed (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David Barner (2008). In Defense of Intuitive Mathematical Theories as the Basis for Natural Number. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):643-644.
    Though there are holes in the theory of how children move through stages of numerical competence, the current approach offers the most promising avenue for characterizing changes in competence as children confront new mathematical concepts. Like the science of mathematics, children's discovery of number is rooted in intuitions about sets, and not purely in analytic truths.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Nathaniel F. Barrett (2011). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (2):197-200.
    I imagine that many readers of AJTP will find it hard to get excited about a new collection of essays about consciousness from the process perspective, no matter how good it is purported to be, because they are bored with the so-called "problem of consciousness" and uninterested in playing the role of the choir for what looks like a lot of old-fashioned Whiteheadian preaching. But in fact this book was conceived with the intention to do much more than preach to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lawrence W. Barsalou (2010). Grounded Cognition: Past, Present, and Future. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):716-724.
    Thirty years ago, grounded cognition had roots in philosophy, perception, cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology. During the next 20 years, grounded cognition continued developing in these areas, and it also took new forms in robotics, cognitive ecology, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychology. In the past 10 years, research on grounded cognition has grown rapidly, especially in cognitive neuroscience, social neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, and developmental psychology. Currently, grounded cognition appears to be achieving increased acceptance throughout cognitive (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Hilary Barth (2008). Do Mental Magnitudes Form Part of the Foundation for Natural Number Concepts? Don't Count Them Out Yet. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):644-645.
    The current consensus among most researchers is that natural number is not built solely upon a foundation of mental magnitudes. On their way to the conclusion that magnitudes do not form any part of that foundation, Rips et al. pass rather quickly by theories suggesting that mental magnitudes might play some role. These theories deserve a closer look.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Hilary Barth, Kristen La Mont, Jennifer Lipton, Stanislas Dehaene, Nancy Kanwisher & Elizabeth Spelke (2006). Non-Symbolic Arithmetic in Adults and Young Children. Cognition 98 (3):199-222.
  23. Paolo Bartolomeo & Gianfranco Dalla Barba (2002). Varieties of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):331-332.
    In agreement with some of the ideas expressed by Perruchet & Vinter (P&V), we believe that some phenomena hitherto attributed to “unconscious” processing may in fact reflect a fundamental distinction between direct and reflexive forms of consciousness. This dichotomy, developed by the phenomenological tradition, is substantiated by examples coming from experimental psychology and lesion neuropsychology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. W. Robert Batsell Jr & Aaron G. Blankenship (2002). Beyond Potentiation: Synergistic Conditioning in Flavor-Aversion Learning. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):383-408.
    Taste-aversion learning has been a popular paradigm for examining associative processes because it often produces outcomes that are different from those observed in other classical conditioning paradigms. One such outcome is taste-mediated odor potentiation in which aversion conditioning with a weak odor and a strong taste results in increased or synergistic conditioning to the odor. Because this strengthened odor aversion was not anticipated by formal models of learning, investigation of taste-mediated odor potentiation was a hot topic in the 1980s. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Batsell Jr & Aaron G. Blankenship (2002). Beyond Potentiation: Synergistic Conditioning in Flavor-Aversion Learning. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):383-408.
    Taste-aversion learning has been a popular paradigm for examining associative processes because it often produces outcomes that are different from those observed in other classical conditioning paradigms. One such outcome is taste-mediated odor potentiation in which aversion conditioning with a weak odor and a strong taste results in increased or synergistic conditioning to the odor. Because this strengthened odor aversion was not anticipated by formal models of learning, investigation of taste-mediated odor potentiation was a hot topic in the 1980s. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. W. Robert Batsell & Aaron G. Blankenship (2002). Beyond Potentiation: Synergistic Conditioning in Flavor-Aversion Learning. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):383-408.
    Taste-aversion learning has been a popular paradigm for examining associative processes because it often produces outcomes that are different from those observed in other classical conditioning paradigms. One such outcome is taste-mediated odor potentiation in which aversion conditioning with a weak odor and a strong taste results in increased or synergistic conditioning to the odor. Because this strengthened odor aversion was not anticipated by formal models of learning, investigation of taste-mediated odor potentiation was a hot topic in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Tim Bayne & Jordi Fernandez (eds.) (2008). Delusion and Self-Deception: Affective and Motivational Influences on Belief Formation (Macquarie Monographs in Cognitive Science). Psychology Press.
    This collection of essays focuses on the interface between delusions and self-deception.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Tom Beckers & Bram Vervliet (2009). The Truth and Value of Theories of Associative Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):200-201.
    In this commentary, we assess the propositional approach to associative learning not only in terms of veridicality and falsifiability, but also in heuristic value. We remark that it has furthered our knowledge and understanding of human, as well as animal, associative learning. At the same time, we maintain that models developed from the association formation tradition continue to bear great heuristic value as well.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2007). The Hypthalamo-Tectoperiaqueductal System: Unconscious Underpinnings of Conscious Behaviour. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):85-86.
    The insight that, in terms of behaviour control, the mesodiencephalic system is superordinate to the cortex should have profound implications for behavioural sciences. Nevertheless, the thalamocortical system could still be deemed an “organ of consciousness” if we came to accept that consciousness is not central to purposeful behaviour, in accordance with instinct theory. Philosophically, Merker's concepts of basic consciousness and ego-centre warrant critical discussion. (Published Online May 1 2007).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Lucas Bietti (2011). Cognitive Pragmatics: The Mental Processes of Communication. Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):1-5.
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 25, Issue 4, Page 623-627, August 2012.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jens Erling Birch (2011). Skills and Knowledge - Nothing but Memory? Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (4):362 - 378.
    The aim of this article is to enquire into neuroscientific research on memory and relate it to topics of skill, knowledge and consciousness. The article outlines some contemporary theories on procedural and working memory, and discusses what contributions they give to sport science and philosophy of sport. It is argued that memory research gives important insights to the neuronal structures and events involved in knowledge and consciousness contributing to sport skills, but that these explanations are not exhaustive. The article argues (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2009). What's Reason Got to Do with It? Affect as the Foundation of Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):201-202.
    We propose that learning has a top-down component, but not in the propositional terms described by Mitchell et al. Specifically, we propose that a host of learning processes, including associative learning, serve to imbue the representation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) with affective meaning.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ned Block (2011). The Anna Karenina Theory of the Unconscious. Neuropsychoanalysis 13 (1):34-37.
    The Anna Karenina Theory says: all conscious states are alike; each unconscious state is unconscious in its own way. This note argues that many components have to function properly to produce consciousness, but failure in any one of many different ones can yield an unconscious state in different ways. In that sense the Anna Karenina theory is true. But in another respect it is false: kinds of unconsciousness depend on kinds of consciousness.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. R. A. Boakes (2009). Learning Without Thinking. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):202-203.
    The main conclusion to draw from Mitchell et al's article is that it is difficult to disentangle cognitive and learning processes in contingency and causal experiments. More compelling evidence for human associate learning comes from research where, because of the type of events involved, participants are unable or unlikely to think about the relationships between the events.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Johan J. Bolhuis (1997). Learning, Development, and Synaptic Plasticity: The Avian Connection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):559-560.
    Quartz & Sejnowski's target article concentrates on the development of a number of neural parameters, especially neuronal processes, in the mammalian brain. Data on learning-related changes in spines and synapses in the developing avian brain are consistent with a constructivist interpretation. The issue of an integration of selectionist and constructivist views is discussed.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Linda A. W. Brakel (2010). Unconscious Knowing and Other Essays in Psycho-Philosophical Analysis. Oxford University Press.
    Unconscious knowing : psychoanalytic evidence in support of a radical epistemic view -- The limits of rationality : vagueness, a case study -- Agency "me"-ness in action -- The placebo effect : psychoanalytic theory can help explain the phenomenon -- Explanations and conclusions.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Gary L. Brase (2004). Functional Clothes for the Emperor. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):328-329.
    A more complete and balanced theoretical framework for social psychology, as recommended in the target article, must include functional explanations of processes – moving beyond enumerations of processes and their properties. These functional explanations are at a different, but complementary, level from process descriptions. The further advancement of social psychology relies on the incorporation of such multilevel explanations.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Gene A. Brewer, Justin Knight, J. Thadeus Meeks & Richard L. Marsh (2011). On the Role of Imagery in Event-Based Prospective Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):901-907.
  39. John Briere (1995). Child Abuse, Memory, and Recall: A Commentary. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):83-87.
  40. Axel Buchner & Edgar Erdfelder (1996). On Assumptions of, Relations Between, and Evaluations of Some Process Dissociation Measurement Models. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):581-594.
  41. Axel Buchner & Werner Wippich (1996). Investigating Fame Judgments: On the Generality of Hypotheses, Conclusions, and Measurement Models. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):226-231.
  42. Axel Buchner & Werner Wippich (1996). Unconscious Gender Bias in Fame Judgments? Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):197-220.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon (1998). Common Ground on Which to Approach the Origins of Higher Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):709-717.
    Imitation research has been hindered by (1) overly molecular analyses of behaviour that ignore hierarchical structure, and (2) attempts to disqualify observational evidence. Program-level imitation is one of a range of cognitive skills for scheduling efficient novel behaviour, in particular, enabling an individual to purloin the organization of another's behaviour for its own. To do so, the individual must perceive the underlying hierarchical schedule of the fluid action it observes and must understand the local functions of subroutines within the overall (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. C. Cahill, M. Al-Eithan & C. D. Frith (1993). Conscious and Unconscious Rule-Induction: A Neuropsychological Case Study. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):210-224.
  45. William Calvin, William H. Calvin , "Memory's Future," Psychology Today 34(2):55ff.
    Psychology's fascination with memory and its imperfections dates back further than we can remember. The first careful experimental studies of memory were published in 1885 by German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus, and tens of thousands of memory studies have been conducted since. What has been learned, and what might the future of memory be?
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Caplan & Gloria Waters (1999). Issues Regarding General and Domain-Specific Resources. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):114-122.
    Commentaries on our target article raise further questions about the validity of an undifferentiated central executive that supplies resources to all verbal tasks. Working memory tasks are more likely to measure divided attention capacities and the efficiency of performing tasks within specific domains than a shared resource pool. In our response to the commentaries, we review and further expand upon empirical findings that relate performance on working memory tasks to sentence processing, concluding that our view that the two are not (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Peter Cariani (1997). Consciousness and the Organization of Neural Processes: Commentary on John Et Al. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):56-64.
  48. Richard A. Carlson (1999). Implicit Representation, Mental States, and Mental Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):761-762.
    Dienes & Perner's target article constitutes a significant advance in thinking about implicit knowledge. However, it largely neglects processing details and thus the time scale of mental states realizing propositional attitudes. Considering real-time processing raises questions about the possible brevity of implicit representation, the nature of processes that generate explicit knowledge, and the points of view from which knowledge may be represented. Understanding the propositional attitude analysis in terms of momentary mental states points the way toward answering these questions.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (2013). Seeing and Retinal Stability: On a Sensorimotor Argument for the Necessity of Eye Movement for Sight. Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):263 - 266.
    Sensorimotor theorists of perception have argued that eye movement is a necessary condition for seeing on the basis that subjects whose retinal images do not move undergo a form of blindness. I show that the argument does not work.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Christine W. Chan (2003). Cognitive Modeling and Representation of Knowledge in Ontological Engineering. Brain and Mind 4 (2):269-282.
    This paper describes the processes of cognitive modeling and representation of human expertise for developing an ontology and knowledge base of an expert system. An ontology is an organization and classification of knowledge. Ontological engineering in artificial intelligence (AI) has the practical goal of constructing frameworks for knowledge that allow computational systems to tackle knowledge-intensive problems and supports knowledge sharing and reuse. Ontological engineering is also a process that facilitates construction of the knowledge base of an intelligent system, which can (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1588