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  1. Keith Abney (2013). The Future of Iust War Theory1. In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge 338.
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  2. Ken Akiba (2000). Vagueness as a Modality. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):359-370.
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  3. Robert Albin (2012). BEYOND MODES OF OBJECTIVITY. Logos and Episteme (3):361-371.
    ABSTRACT: Frege, and others who followed him, stressed the role of fallibility as a means to defining ‘objectivity.’ By defining objective judgments as fallible, these philosophers contributed to the consolidation of a theory of objectivity which suggested interpreting epistemological, as well as other judgements, as being objective. An important philosophical implication of this theory lies in its disclosure of the interrelations between truth and objectivity. In light of this insight, and based on an analysis of instances of false (epistemological and (...)
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  4. Virgil C. Aldrich (1937). Some Meanings of 'Vague'. Analysis 4 (6):89 - 95.
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  5. Ahmad Almukdad & David Nelson (1984). Constructible Falsity and Inexact Predicates. Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):231-233.
  6. L. Aqvist (1962). Reflections on the Logic of Nonsense. Theoria 28 (1):138--57.
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  7. S. L. Armstrong, L. R. Gleitman & H. Gleitman (1983). What Some Concepts Might Not Be. Cognition 13 (1):263--308.
  8. C. M. Asmus (2013). Vagueness and Revision Sequences. Synthese 190 (6):953-974.
    Theories of truth and vagueness are closely connected; in this article, I draw another connection between these areas of research. Gupta and Belnap’s Revision Theory of Truth is converted into an approach to vagueness. I show how revision sequences from a general theory of definitions can be used to understand the nature of vague predicates. The revision sequences show how the meaning of vague predicates are interconnected with each other. The approach is contrasted with the similar supervaluationist approach.
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  9. J. L. Austin (1962). Sense and Sensibilia. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the one to put into the hands of those who have been over-impressed by Austin's critics....[Warnock's] brilliant editing puts everybody who is concerned with philosophical problems in his debt.
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  10. Andrew Bacon (2009). Vagueness and Uncertainty. Dissertation, BPhil Thesis, Oxford University
    In this thesis I investigate the behaviour of uncertainty about vague matters. It is a fairly common view that vagueness involves uncertainty of some sort. However there are many fundamental questions about this kind of uncertainty that are left open. Could you be genuinely uncertain about p when there is no matter of fact whether p? Could you remain uncertain in a vague proposition even if you knew exactly which possible world obtained? Should your degrees of belief be probabilistically coherent? (...)
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  11. Archie J. Bahm (1981). Swaminarayan and the Future. In Sahajānanda (ed.), New Dimensions in Vedanta Philosophy. Bochasanwasi Shri Aksharpurushottam Sanstha 1.
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  12. Gordon P. Baker (1970). The Logic of Vagueness.
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  13. Gordon P. Baker & P. M. S. Hacker (1985). Wittgenstein: Rules, Grammar and Necessity. Blackwell.
  14. Philippe Balbiani (2004). Reasoning About Vague Concepts in the Theory of Property Systems. Logique Et Analyse 47:445.
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  15. Elizabeth Barnes (2009). Vagueness. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge
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  16. Elizabeth Barnes & Williams Jrg (2011). Response to Eklund. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 6.
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  17. Walter Belardi (2006). Il Mondo Fuzzy Del Dopo-Babele. Il Calamo.
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  18. A. Cornelius Benjamin (1939). Science and Vagueness. Philosophy of Science 6 (4):422-431.
  19. Brandon Bennett (2005). Modes of Concept Definition and Varieties of Vagueness. Applied Ontology 1 (1):17-26.
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  20. Thomas Bittner (2011). Vague Size Predicates. Applied Ontology 6 (4):317-343.
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  21. Simon Blackburn (2011). TPM Essay. The Philosophers' Magazine 52 (52):34-42.
    I think it is a lapse of taste to spend a grown-up life on problems of which people in the office next door, let alone those outside the building, cannot see the point. I rather fear that the so-called semantic or logical problem of vagueness, Professor Williamson’s own showcase example of his compulsory methods, strikes me as like that.
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  22. Andreas Blume & Oliver Board (2013). Intentional Vagueness. Erkenntnis:1-45.
    This paper analyzes communication with a language that is vague in the sense that identical messages do not always result in identical interpretations. It is shown that strategic agents frequently add to this vagueness by being intentionally vague, i.e. they deliberately choose less precise messages than they have to among the ones available to them in equilibrium. Having to communicate with a vague language can be welfare enhancing because it mitigates conflict. In equilibria that satisfy a dynamic stability condition intentional (...)
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  23. Harmon Seine Boertien (1975). Vagueness of Container Nouns and Cognate Verbs. University Microfilms International.
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  24. Émile Borel (2014). An Economic Paradox: The Sophism of the Heap of Wheat and Statistical Truths. Erkenntnis 79 (5):1081-1088.
    [688/2197] In many economic matters there arises a paradox that may be related to what in logic courses is called the “sophism of the heap of wheat”. Among the sophisms bequeathed to us by the Greeks, none is worthier to have come down through the centuries than this “sophism of the heap of wheat”; indeed this no mere puzzle, but a topical example of a frequent difficulty, as much in practical life as in pure speculation.One grain of wheat does not (...)
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  25. Chris Boyne (1972). Vagueness and Colour Predicates. Mind 81 (324):576-577.
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  26. Jarrett Ernest Brock (1969). C. S. Peirce's Logic of Vagueness. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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  27. Arthur W. Burks (1946). Empiricism and Vagueness. Journal of Philosophy 43 (18):477-486.
  28. Heather Burnett (2014). Penumbral Connections in Comparative Constructions. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 24 (1-2):35-60.
    This paper gives a novel analysis of the logical structure underlying three classes of vague adjectival predicates (relative adjectives, i.e., tall; total adjectives, i.e., straight; and partial adjectives, i.e., wet) and the realisation of this structure in arguments formed with comparative constructions (i.e., John is taller than Mary). I analyse three classes of valid arguments that can be formed with different types of gradable predicates in comparative constructions: scalarity arguments (i.e., Mary is taller than John and John is tall Mary (...)
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  29. Linda Burns (1986). Vagueness and Coherence. Synthese 68 (3):487 - 513.
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  30. Paul Cammell, The Inside Without and the Outside Within: A Philosophical, Developmental and Clinical Study of Borderline Experience.
    This work is a multidisciplinary project that explores the “borderline” concept as it is adopted in psychological, psychiatric and psychoanalytic theory in notions of “borderline phenomena”, “borderline personality organization” and “borderline personality disorder”. I argue that usage of the borderline concept has become overburdened by ethical ambiguity and a lack of conceptual clarity because prevailing theories focus upon approaches that are excessively individualistic, categorical, intrapsychic, and atemporal. I argue that the borderline concept has become a problematic limit concept that requires (...)
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  31. Erik Carlson (2013). Vagueness, Incomparability, and the Collapsing Principle. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):449-463.
    John Broome has argued that incomparability and vagueness cannot coexist in a given betterness order. His argument essentially hinges on an assumption he calls the ‘collapsing principle’. In an earlier article I criticized this principle, but Broome has recently expressed doubts about the cogency of my criticism. Moreover, Cristian Constantinescu has defended Broome’s view from my objection. In this paper, I present further arguments against the collapsing principle, and try to show that Constantinescu’s defence of Broome’s position fails.
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  32. John L. Casti (1997). The Borderline. Complexity 3 (1):5-7.
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  33. María Cerezo (2013). Remarks on the Interest-Relative Theory of Vagueness. Acta Analytica 28 (3):381-394.
    I discuss the interest-relative account of vagueness and argue for a distinction between relational vague predicates and non-relational vague predicates depending on the kind of properties expressed by them. The strategy rests on three arguments arising from the existence of clear cases of a vague predicate, from contexts in which a different answer is required for questions about whether a vague predicate applies to an item, and whether such an item satisfies the interest of an agent, and from cases where (...)
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  34. Arnold Jensen Chien (1987). On Vagueness. Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    The vagueness of a vague sentence intuitively consists in there being both a deficiency in its meaning and a multiplicity of things which a speaker might mean by it. One who knows the meaning is attuned both to the deficiency and to constraints on the possible speaker's meanings. I attempt to provide a theory of speaker's meaning and of meaning which does justice to these phenomena. ;I analyze a speaker's meaning as an answer to a "What-do-you-mean "-question, and analyze the (...)
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  35. Roderick Chisholm (1942). The Problem of the Speckled Hen. Mind 51 (204):368-373.
  36. Noam A. Chomsky (1980). Rules and Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (127):1-61.
    The book from which these sections are excerpted (N. Chomsky, Rules and Representations, Columbia University Press, 1980) is concerned with the prospects for assimilating the study of human intelligence and its products to the natural sciences through the investigation of cognitive structures, understood as systems of rules and representations that can be regarded as These mental structui′es serve as the vehicles for the exercise of various capacities. They develop in the mind on the basis of an innate endowment that permits (...)
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  37. Pablo Cobreros, Paul Egré, Dave Ripley & Robert van Rooij (forthcoming). Pragmatic Interpretations of Vague Expressions: Strongest Meaning and Nonmonotonic Consequence. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-19.
    Recent experiments have shown that naive speakers find borderline contradictions involving vague predicates acceptable. In Cobreros et al. (Journal of Philosophical Logic, 41, 347–385, 2012a) we proposed a pragmatic explanation of the acceptability of borderline contradictions, building on a three-valued semantics. In a reply, Alxatib et al. (Journal of Philosophical Logic, 42, 619–634, 2013) show, however, that the pragmatic account predicts the wrong interpretations for some examples involving disjunction, and propose as a remedy a semantic analysis instead, based on fuzzy (...)
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  38. Evan Cockshaw (2001). Arguing for the Existence of God in the Age of Quantum Indeterminacy. Quodlibet 3.
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  39. Murray Code (1997). On the Poverty of Scientism. Metaphilosophy 28 (1):102--22.
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  40. Jeffrey P. Cohn (1985). Lead Shot Poisons Bald Eagles. BioScience 35 (8):474-476.
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  41. Neil Cooper (1995). Paradox Lost: Understanding Vague Predicates. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (2):244 – 269.
    Abstract The paper is concerned with the status of vague predicates. It is argued that they are for the most part ?classifiers?, which are covertly comparatives and name not monadic properties but relations. The Sorites Paradox, it is claimed, is thus defused and a verdict theory of vague predicates is presented. Our practice in using vague words is described and it is contended that in our use of these predicates we always have a permanent possibility of independent demarcation. Wittgenstein's picture (...)
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  42. Irving M. Copilowish (1939). Border-Line Cases, Vagueness, and Ambiguity. Philosophy of Science 6 (2):181-195.
  43. M. J. Cresswell (1986). A Review of Borderline Reviewing. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 12 (2):175-190.
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  44. Kris de Jaegher (2003). A Game-Theoretic Rationale for Vagueness. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (5):637-659.
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  45. Dan López de Sa (2013). Vagueness as Semantic Indecision: Metaphysical Vagueness Vs Indeterminate Reference. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 14 (2):197-209.
    After presenting a negative characterization of metaphysical vagueness and the main tenets of the view of vagueness as semantic indecision, the paper critically discusses the objection that such a view requires that at least some vagueness not be just constituted by semantic indecision—but rather by the metaphysical vagueness of some semantic relations themselves submitted by Trenton Merricks and, more recently, Nathan Salmon.
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  46. Cooper de (1977). Bivalence, Determinism, and Realism. Logique Et Analyse 20 (77-78):148-155.
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  47. A. Deb (2005). Understanding Bivalence. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1/2).
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  48. Vincent Degauquier (2012). Cuts, Gluts and Gaps. Logique Et Analyse 218:229-240.
    This paper deals with predicate logics involving two truth values (here referred to as bivalent logics). Sequent calculi for these logics rely on a general notion of sequent that helps to make the principles of excluded middle and non-contradiction explicit. Several formulations of the redundancy of cut are possible in these sequent calculi. Indeed, four different forms of cut can be distinguished. I prove that only two of them hold for positive sequent calculus (which is both paraconsistent and paracomplete) while (...)
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  49. Richard DeWitt (1995). Vagueness, Semantics, and the Language of Thought. Psyche 1 (1).
    In recent years, a number of well-known intentional realists have focused their energy on attempts to provide a naturalized theory of mental representation. What tends to be overlooked, however, is that a naturalized theory of mental representation will not, by itself, salvage intentional realism. Since most naturalistic properties play no interesting causal role, intentional realists must also solve the problem of showing how intentional properties , even if naturalized, could be causally efficacious. Because of certain commitments, this problem is especially (...)
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  50. Giuseppina Scotto di Carlo (2013). The Language of the UN: Vagueness in Security Council Resolutions Relating to the Second Gulf War. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (3):693-706.
    Over the last few years the diplomatic language of UN resolutions has repeatedly been questioned for the excessive presence of vagueness. The use of vague terms could be connected to the genre of diplomatic texts, as resolutions should be applicable to every international contingency and used to mitigate tensions between different legal cultures. However, excessive vagueness could also lead to biased or even strategically-motivated interpretations of resolutions, undermining their legal impact and triggering conflicts instead of diplomatic solutions. This study aims (...)
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