Related categories
Subcategories:
224 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 224
Material to categorize
  1. Thomas T. Ballmer & Manfred Pinkal (eds.) (1983). Approaching Vagueness. Sole Distributors for the U.S.A. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..
  2. Robert Barnard (1999). Is Vagueness Non-Projectability? Acta Analytica 14 (1):47--66.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Max Black (1970). Margins of Precision. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
  4. Max Black (1962). The Analysis of Rules. In , Models and Metaphors: Studies in Language and Logic. Cornell University Press.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Alexander Burgess (1998). In Defense of an Indeterminist Theory of Vagueness. The Monist 81 (1):233--52.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Mark A. Changizi (1999). Vagueness and Computation: A Theory of Why There is Vagueness. Acta Analytica 14 (1):39--45.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. J. P. Cleave (1970). The Notion of Validity in Logical Systems with Inexact Predicates. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (3):269-274.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John Coates (1997). Keynes, Vague Concepts and Fuzzy Logic. In G. C. Harcourt & P. A. Riach (eds.), A ”Second Edition’ of the General Theory. Routledge. 244-260.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Murray Code (1995). Myths of Reason: Vagueness, Rationality, and the Lure of Logic. Humanities Press.
  10. Morris R. Cohen (1927). Concepts and Twilight Zones. Journal of Philosophy 24 (25):673-683.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Leon Felkins, Dilemmas of Ambiguity and Vagueness.
    "All the limitative Theorems of metamathematics and the theory of computation suggest that once the ability to represent your own structure has reached a certain critical point, that is the kiss of death: it guarantees that you can never represent yourself totally. Godel's Incompleteness Theorem, Church's Undecidability Theorem, Turing's Halting Problem, Turski's Truth Theorem -- all have the flavour of some ancient fairy tale which warns you that `To seek self-knowledge is to embark on a journey which...will always be incomplete, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Brendan S. Gillon (1990). Ambiguity, Generality, and Indeterminacy: Tests and Definitions. [REVIEW] Synthese 85 (3):391 - 416.
    The problem addressed is that of finding a sound characterization of ambiguity. Two kinds of characterizations are distinguished: tests and definitions. Various definitions of ambiguity are critically examined and contrasted with definitions of generality and indeterminacy, concepts with which ambiguity is sometimes confused. One definition of ambiguity is defended as being more theoretically adequate than others which have been suggested by both philosophers and linguists. It is also shown how this definition of ambiguity obviates a problem thought to be posed (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Review author[S.]: Paul Horwich (1997). The Nature of Vagueness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):929-935.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Keith Hossack (1994). Intolerant Clones. Mind 103 (409):55-58.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. D. Hyde (1999). Pleading Classicism. Mind 108 (432):733-735.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Dominic Hyde (2001). A Reply to Beall and Colyvan. Mind 110 (438):409--411.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Dominic Hyde (1995). Proliferating Conceptions of Truth: Comments on McGee and McLaughlin. Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (S1):253-261.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. A. Iacona (2005). Rethinking Bivalence. Synthese 146 (3):283 - 302.
    Classical logic rests on the assumption that there are two mutually exclusive and jointly exhaustive truth values. This assumption has always been surrounded by philosophical controversy. Doubts have been raised about its legitimacy, and hence about the legitimacy of classical logic. Usually, the assumption is stated in the form of a general principle, namely the principle that every proposition is either true or false. Then, the philosophical controversy is often framed in terms of the question whether every proposition is either (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Rosanna Keefe (1998). Vagueness and Language Clusters. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (4):611 – 620.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Haig Khatchadourian (1962). Vagueness. Philosophical Quarterly 12 (47):138-152.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ewan Klein (1980). A Semantics for Positive and Comparative Adjectives. Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (1):1--45.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Dharmendra Kumar (1971). Vagueness and Subjunctivity. Mind 80 (317):127-131.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Dharmendra Kumar (1967). Logic and Inexact Predicates. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 18 (3):211-222.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Alice Kyburg & Michael Morreau (2000). Fitting Words: Vague Language in Context. Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (6):577-597.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Stephen Leeds (2000). A Disquotationalist Looks at Vagueness. Philosophical Topics 28 (1):107--28.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stephen Leeds (1997). Incommensurability and Vagueness. Noûs 31 (3):385-407.
  27. Kenton F. Machina (1972). Vague Predicates. American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (3):225 - 233.
  28. Vann McGee & Brian P. McLaughlin (2000). The Lessons of the Many. Philosophical Topics 28 (1):129-151.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Mario Mignucci (1993). The Stoic Analysis of the Sorites. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93:231 - 245.
  30. Kristie Miller (2005). Blocking the Path From Vagueness to Four Dimensionalism. Ratio 18 (3):317–331.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks (1991). Some Notes on the Nature of Methodological Indeterminacy. Synthese 88 (3):359 - 378.
    This paper is an attempt to extend the meaning of the concept of indeterminacy for the human sciences. The authors do this by coining the term methodological indeterminacy and arguing that indeterminacy is better understood when linked to specific methodological techniques. Paradoxically, while specific research techniques demonstrate that the issue of indeterminacy is complex, yielding the possibility of types and degrees, it does not eliminate the problem of translation first raised by Quine. However, the authors go on to argue that, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Andrew P. Mills (1995). Unsettled Problems with Vague Truth. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):103 - 117.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Martin Montminy (2011). Indeterminacy, Incompleteness, Indecision, and Other Semantic Phenomena. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):73-98.
    This paper explores the relationships between Davidson's indeterminacy of interpretation thesis and two semantic properties of sentences that have come to be recognized recently, namely semantic incompleteness and semantic indecision.1 More specifically, I will examine what the indeterminacy thesis entails for sentences of the form 'By sentence S (or word w), agent A means that m' and 'Agent A believes that p.' My primary goal is to shed light on the indeterminacy thesis and its consequences. I will distinguish two kinds (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Paul Noordhof (2002). Personal Dualism and the Argument From Differential Vagueness. Philosophical Papers 31 (1):63-86.
    Abstract In Causing Actions, Pietroski defends a distinctive view of the relationship between mind and body which he calls Personal Dualism. Central to his defence is the Argument from Differential Vagueness. It moves from the claim that mental events have different vagueness of spatiotemporal boundaries from neural events to the claim that mental events are not identical to neural events. In response, I argue that this presupposes an ontological account of vagueness that there is no reason to believe in this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Peter Pagin, Central Gap Domain Restriction.
    Ordinary intuitions that vague predicates are tolerant, or cannot have sharp boundaries, can be formalized in first-order logic in at least two non-equivalent ways, a stronger and a weaker. The stronger turns out to be false in domains that have a significant central gap for the predicate in question, i.e. where a sufficiently large middle segment of the ordering relation (such as taller for ‘tall’) is uninstantiated. The weaker principle is true in such domains, but does not in those domains (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. C. S. Peirce (1902). Vague. In J. M. Baldwin (ed.), Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology. Macmillan.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ullin T. Place (1999). Vagueness as a Mark of Dispositional Intentionality. Acta Analytica 14 (23):91-109.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Howard Robinson (2009). Vagueness, Realism, Language and Thought. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt1):83-101.
    The problem of vagueness and the sorites paradox arise because we try to treat natural language as if it were a unitary formal system. In fact, natural language contains a large variety of representational ontologies that serve different purposes and which cannot be united formally, but which can intuitively be taken as ways of seeing a common basic ontology. Using this framework, we can save classical logic from vagueness and avoid the sorites.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Paul A. Roth (1978). Paradox and Indeterminacy. Journal of Philosophy 75 (7):347-367.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Charles Sayward (1989). Does the Law of Excluded Middle Require Bivalence? Erkenntnis 31 (1):129 - 137.
    Determining whether the law of excluded middle requires bivalence depends upon whether we are talking about sentences or propositions. If we are talking about sentences, neither side has a decisive case. If we are talking of propositions, there is a strong argument on the side of those who say the excluded middle does require bivalence. I argue that all challenges to this argument can be met.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Roy A. Sorensen (1998). Sharp Boundaries for Blobs. Philosophical Studies 91 (3):275-295.
  42. Roy A. Sorensen (1989). Slipping Off the Slippery Slope: A Reply to Professor Jacquette. Philosophy and Rhetoric 22 (3):195 - 202.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. R. G. Swinburne (1969). Vagueness, Inexactness, and Imprecision. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (4):281-299.
    THERE IS OFTEN UNCERTAINTY ABOUT WHETHER SOME PREDICATE APPLIES TO SOME PHYSICAL OBJECT OR STATE. THIS UNCERTAINTY MAY HAVE ANY OF THREE SOURCES - VAGUENESS OF A TERM, INEXACTNESS OF A CONCEPT, OR PRACTICAL DIFFICULTY IN DETERMINING ITS APPLICABILITY. VARIOUS WAYS IN WHICH CONCEPTUAL INEXACTNESS OR PRACTICAL DIFFICULTY MAY PRODUCE UNCERTAINTY ARE DISTINGUISHED. NEITHER TERMINOLOGICAL VAGUENESS, NOR PRACTICAL DIFFICULTY IN DETERMINING THE APPLICABILITY OF A CONCEPT ARE NECESSARY FEATURES OF EVERY LANGUAGE IN EVERY PHYSICAL WORLD, BUT CONCEPTUAL INEXACTNESS IS A (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Loretta Torrago (2000). Vague Causation. Noûs 34 (3):313–347.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Peter Verdée & Stephan der Waart van Gulivank (2008). A Generic Framework for Adaptive Vague Logics. Studia Logica 90 (3):385 - 405.
    In this paper, we present a generic format for adaptive vague logics. Logics based on this format are able to (1) identify sentences as vague or non-vague in light of a given set of premises, and to (2) dynamically adjust the possible set of inferences in accordance with these identifications, i.e. sentences that are identified as vague allow only for the application of vague inference rules and sentences that are identified as non-vague also allow for the application of some extra (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Michael Wreen (1985). Vagueness, Values, and the World/Word Wedge. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (4):451 – 464.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Higher-Order Vagueness
  1. Nicholas Asher, Josh Dever & Chris Pappas (2009). Supervaluations Debugged. Mind 118 (472):901-933.
    Supervaluational accounts of vagueness have come under assault from Timothy Williamson for failing to provide either a sufficiently classical logic or a disquotational notion of truth, and from Crispin Wright and others for incorporating a notion of higher-order vagueness, via the determinacy operator, which leads to contradiction when combined with intuitively appealing ‘gap principles’. We argue that these criticisms of supervaluation theory depend on giving supertruth an unnecessarily central role in that theory as the sole notion of truth, rather than (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andrew Bacon, Vagueness at Every Order: The Prospects of Denying B.
    A number of arguments purport to show that vague properties determine sharp boundaries at higher orders. That is, although we may countenance vagueness concerning the location of boundaries for vague predicates, every predicate can instead be associated with precise knowable cut-off points deriving from precision in their higher order boundaries. -/- I argue that this conclusion is indeed paradoxical, and identify the assumption responsible for the paradox as the Brouwerian principle B for vagueness: that if p then it's completely determinate (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Andrew Bacon (2013). Non-Classical Metatheory for Non-Classical Logics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (2):335-355.
    A number of authors have objected to the application of non-classical logic to problems in philosophy on the basis that these non-classical logics are usually characterised by a classical metatheory. In many cases the problem amounts to more than just a discrepancy; the very phenomena responsible for non-classicality occur in the field of semantics as much as they do elsewhere. The phenomena of higher order vagueness and the revenge liar are just two such examples. The aim of this paper is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Susanne Bobzien, A Model-Theoretic Account of Columnar Higher-Order Vagueness.
    ABSTRACT: Paper currently being revised.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 224