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  1. added 2015-02-27
    Nikolay Milkov (2006). Hermann Lotze's "Microcosm". In A.-T. Tymieniecka (ed.), Islamic Philosophy and Phenomenology on the Perennial Issue of Microcosm and Macrocosm. Kluwer. 41-65.
    Lotze’s "Microcosm" was published in three volumes, in 1856, 1858 and 1864, respectively. It was soon one of the most widely read philosophy books of the time. It was translated into French and Russian immediately, into English in 1885/87, and into Italian in 1911/16. The book saw six editions in Germany alone by 1923.
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  2. added 2015-02-25
    Matthew Rendall (forthcoming). Mere Addition and the Separateness of Persons. Journal of Philosophy.
    How can we resist the repugnant conclusion? James Griffin has suggested that part way through the sequence we may reach a world—let us call it "J"— in which the lives are lexically superior to those that follow. If it would be better to live a single life in J than through any number of lives in the next one ("K"), we may judge the smaller world preferable, as if aggregating the lives in the larger world intrapersonally. I argue that the (...)
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  3. added 2015-02-25
    Antti Kauppinen (forthcoming). What's So Great About Experience? Res Philosophica.
    Suppose that our life choices result in unpredictable experiences, as L.A. Paul has recently argued. What does this mean for the possibility of rational prudential choice? Not as much as Paul thinks. First, what’s valuable about experience is its broadly hedonic quality, and empirical studies suggest we tend to significantly overestimate the impact of our choices in this respect. Second, contrary to what Paul suggests, the value of finding out what an outcome is like for us does not suffice to (...)
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  4. added 2015-02-25
    Antti Kauppinen (forthcoming). Meaningfulness (Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being). In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge.
    This paper is an overview of contemporary theories of meaning in life and its relation to well-being.
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  5. added 2015-02-23
    Jason R. Raibley (2015). Atomism and Holism in the Philosophy of Well-Being. In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook to the Philosophy of Well-being. Routledge.
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  6. added 2015-02-23
    Anca Gheaus (2015). Unfinished Adults and Defective Children: On the Nature and Value of Childhood. Journal for Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-21.
    Traditionally, most philosophers saw childhood as a state of deficiency and thought that its value was entirely dependent on how successfully it prepares individuals for adulthood. Yet, there are good reasons to think that childhood also has intrinsic value. Children possess certain intrinsically valuable abilities to a higher degree than adults. Moreover, going through a phase when one does not yet have a “self of one’s own,” and experimenting one’s way to a stable self, seems intrinsically valuable. I argue that (...)
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  7. added 2015-02-23
    Jason R. Raibley (2013). Values, Agency, and Welfare. Philosophical Topics 41 (1):187-214.
    The values-based approach to welfare holds that it is good for one to realize goals, activities, and relationships with which one strongly (and stably) identifies. This approach preserves the subjectivity of welfare while affirming that a life well lived must be active, engaged, and subjectively meaningful. As opposed to more objective theories, it is unified, naturalistic, and ontologically parsimonious. However, it faces objections concerning the possibility of self-sacrifice, disinterested and paradoxical values, and values that are out of sync with physical (...)
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  8. added 2015-02-23
    Jason R. Raibley (2012). Happiness is Not Well-Being. Journal of Happiness Studies 13 (6):1105-1129.
    This paper attempts to explain the conceptual connections between happiness and well-being. It first distinguishes episodic happiness from happiness in the personal attribute sense. It then evaluates two recent proposals about the connection between happiness and well-being: (1) the idea that episodic happiness and well-being both have the same fundamental determinants, so that a person is well-off to a particular degree in virtue of the fact that they are happy to that degree, and (2) the idea that happiness in the (...)
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  9. added 2015-02-22
    Ben Ware (forthcoming). Back to the Bad Old Things: Living Wrong Life Rightly. Key Words.
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  10. added 2015-02-12
    James Andow (forthcoming). Expecting Moral Philosophers to Be Reliable. Dialectica.
    Are philosophers’ intuitions more reliable than philosophical novices’? Are we entitled to assume the superiority of philosophers’ intuitions just as we assume that experts in other domains have more reliable intuitions than novices? Ryberg raises some doubts and his arguments promise to undermine the expertise defence of intuition-use in philosophy once and for all. In this paper, I raise a number of objections to these arguments. I argue that philosophers receive sufficient feedback about the quality of their intuitions and that (...)
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  11. added 2015-02-05
    Argyris Arnellos, Thomas Spyrou & Ioannis Darzentas (2010). Naturalising the Design Process: Autonomy and Interaction as Core Features. In Marcin Miłkowski Konrad Talmont-Kaminski (ed.), Beyond Description: Naturalism and Normativity. College Publications.
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  12. added 2015-01-10
    Nicolas Delon (2014). Moral Status, Final Value, and Extrinsic Properties. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (3pt3):371-379.
    Starting from a distinction between intrinsic and final value, I explore the implications of the supervenience of final value on extrinsic properties regarding moral status. I make a case for ‘extrinsic moral status’ based on ‘extrinsic final value’. I show that the assumption of ‘moral individualism’, that moral status supervenes merely on intrinsic properties, is misguided, and results from a conflation of intrinsic with final value. I argue that at least one extrinsic property, namely vulnerability, can be the basis of (...)
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  13. added 2015-01-09
    Tobias Keiling (2014). What Phenomenology Ought to Be. Research in Phenomenology:281-300.
    Steven Crowell’s rich book is an eminent advance in the interpretation of Husserl and Heidegger, in thinking about the nature of phenomenology as a way of philosophical inquiry, and in accessing the contribution phenomenology can make to philosophy in general. Just as its predecessor Husserl, Heidegger, and the Space of Meaning (2001) has not stood uncontested—the review by Taylor Carman, for instance, is very critical—Crowell’s new book on normativity is also likely to spur debate. But such debate should be most (...)
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  14. added 2015-01-08
    Johan E. Gustafsson (2011). Preference and Choice. Dissertation, Royal Institute of Technology
  15. added 2014-12-28
    Eden Lin (2014). Pluralism About Well‐Being. Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):127-154.
    Theories of well-being purport to identify the basic goods and bads whose presence in a person's life determines how well she is faring. Monism is the view that there is only one basic good and one basic bad. Pluralism is the view that there is either more than one basic good or more than one basic bad. In this paper, I give an argument for pluralism that is general in the sense that it does not purport to identify any basic (...)
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  16. added 2014-12-20
    Cecilia Tohaneanu (2013). Notiuni de filosofie morala. Pro Universitaria.
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  17. added 2014-12-14
    Stephen M. Campbell (forthcoming). The Concept of Well-Being. In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge.
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  18. added 2014-12-11
    Annette Dufner (2014). Contrasting Mill and Sidgwick. A Development Analysis of the Value Theory of Classical Utilitarianism. Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 39 (2):173-193.
    This paper points out a number of long-standing objections to Mill’s theory of the good and shows how exactly Sidgwick’s more detailed approach can avoid these pitfalls. In particular, critics have always insisted that (i) Mill’s "proof" of utilitarianism represents a naturalistic fallacy, and that (ii) his qualitative hedonism is inconsistent. Sidgwick’s "ideal element" of the good allows him to avoid these charges, and sheds new light on the assumption that the 'hedonism' of classical utilitarianism is a purely naturalistic concept. (...)
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  19. added 2014-12-05
    Sven Nyholm (forthcoming). Motivation-Enhancements and Domain-Specific Values. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience.
    Recent research suggests that “smart drugs” don’t make healthy individuals who use them smarter. The main effects are instead on levels of motivation and interest. So the main ethical question here is not whether there is anything wrong or regrettable about healthy individuals’ using these drugs to make themselves smarter. It is rather whether there is anything problematic about their using these drugs to control or modulate their levels of motivation and interest. This question can either be discussed on a (...)
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  20. added 2014-12-01
    Nick Riggle (forthcoming). Personal Style and Artistic Style. Philosophical Quarterly.
    What is it for a person to have style? Philosophers working in action theory, ethics, and aesthetics are surprisingly quiet on this question. I begin by considering whether theories of artistic style shed any light on it. Many philosophers, artists, and art historians are attracted to some version of the view that artistic style is the expression of personality. I clarify this view and argue that it is implausible for both artistic style and, suitably modified, personal style. In fact, both (...)
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  21. added 2014-11-30
    Mark Alfano, Andrew Higgins & Jacob Levernier (forthcoming). Mapping Human Values: Enhancing Social Marketing Through Obituary Data-Mining. In Lynn Kahle & Eda Atay (eds.), Social and Cultural Values in a Global and Digital Age.