This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. added 2014-12-20
    Cecilia Tohaneanu (2013). Notiuni de filosofie morala. Pro Universitaria.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. added 2014-12-14
    Stephen M. Campbell (forthcoming). The Concept of Well-Being. In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. added 2014-12-11
    Annette Dufner (2014). Contrasting Mill and Sidgwick. A Development Analysis of the Value Theory of Classical Utilitarianism. Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 39 (2):173-193.
    This paper points out a number of long-standing objections to Mill’s theory of the good and shows how exactly Sidgwick’s more detailed approach can avoid these pitfalls. In particular, critics have always insisted that (i) Mill’s "proof" of utilitarianism represents a naturalistic fallacy, and that (ii) his qualitative hedonism is inconsistent. Sidgwick’s "ideal element" of the good allows him to avoid these charges, and sheds new light on the assumption that the 'hedonism' of classical utilitarianism is a purely naturalistic concept. (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. added 2014-12-05
    Sven Nyholm (forthcoming). Motivation-Enhancements and Domain-Specific Values. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience.
    Recent research suggests that “smart drugs” don’t make healthy individuals who use them smarter. The main effects are instead on levels of motivation and interest. So the main ethical question here is not whether there is anything wrong or regrettable about healthy individuals’ using these drugs to make themselves smarter. It is rather whether there is anything problematic about their using these drugs to control or modulate their levels of motivation and interest. This question can either be discussed on a (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. added 2014-12-01
    Nick Riggle (forthcoming). Personal Style and Artistic Style. Philosophical Quarterly.
    What is it for a person to have style? Philosophers working in action theory, ethics, and aesthetics are surprisingly quiet on this question. I begin by considering whether theories of artistic style shed any light on it. Many philosophers, artists, and art historians are attracted to some version of the view that artistic style is the expression of personality. I clarify this view and argue that it is implausible for both artistic style and, suitably modified, personal style. In fact, both (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. added 2014-11-30
    Mark Alfano, Andrew Higgins & Jacob Levernier (forthcoming). Mapping Human Values: Enhancing Social Marketing Through Obituary Data-Mining. In Lynn Kahle & Eda Atay (eds.), Social and Cultural Values in a Global and Digital Age.
  7. added 2014-11-18
    Tiankui Wang (2011). Zhongguo Lun Li de Zhen Xia Qi Yuan: Zhe Xue Yu Jing Zhong de Shun Wen Hua. Hunan Ren Min Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. added 2014-11-18
    Tiankui Wang (2011). Zhongguo Lun Li de Zhou Xin Tu Po: Li Shi Yu Jing Zhong de Shun Wen Hua. Hunan Ren Min Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. added 2014-11-18
    Yūkō Kitakage (2011). Bushidō No Bigaku. Bensei Shuppan.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. added 2014-11-15
    Michael Yudanin (forthcoming). Can Positive Duties Be Derived From Kant's Categorical Imperative? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.
    Kant’s moral philosophy usually considers two types of duties: negative duties that prohibit certain actions and positive duties commanding action. With that, Kant insists on deriving all morality from reason alone. Such is the Categorical Imperative that Kant lays at the basis of ethics. Yet while negative duties can be derived from the Categorical Imperative and thus from reason, the paper argues that this is not the case with positive duties. After answering a number of attempts to derive positive duties (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. added 2014-11-10
    Ben Bramble (forthcoming). Consequentialism About Meaning in Life. Utilitas.
    In this paper, I defend what I call Consequentialism about Meaning in Life, the view that (1) one’s life is meaningful at time t just in case one’s surviving at t would be good in some way, and (2) one’s life was meaningful considered as a whole just in case the world was (or will be) made better in some way for one’s having existed.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. added 2014-11-10
    Krishna Mani Pathak (2010). Poverty and Hunger in the Developing World: Ethics, the Global Economy, and Human Survival. Asia Journal of Global Studies 3 (2):88-102.
    The large number of hungry people in a global economy based on industrialization, privatization, and free trade raises the question of the ethical dimensions of the worsening food crisis in the world in general and in developing countries in particular. Who bears the moral responsibility for the tragic situation in Africa and Asia where people are starving due to poverty? Who is morally responsible for their poverty - the hungry people themselves? the international community? any particular agency or institution? In (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. added 2014-11-06
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Life, Meaning Of. In Henk ten Have (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Bioethics. Springer.
    An overview of how themes regarding meaning in life and related values enter into bioethical thought and discourses, with discussion of the point of healthcare, the relevance of 'non-moral' goods when practicing medicine, the justifiability of assisted suicide/euthanasia, and similar kinds of topics.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. added 2014-10-22
    Antti Kauppinen (2014). Flourishing and Finitude. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy:1-6.
    It would be terrible for us if humanity ceased to exist after we all die. But of course, eventually humanity will go out of existence. Does this result in a vicious regress if our flourishing hangs on what happens after us? Mark Johnston thinks so. In this note, I explain how Johnston's objection can be avoided. Briefly, our activities have a meaning horizon that extends for some generations after us. What matters is that we make a positive difference to the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. added 2014-10-21
    Hallvard Lillehammer (forthcoming). Minding Your Own Business? Understanding Indifference as a Virtue. Philosophical Perspectives 28.
    Indifference is sometimes described as a virtue. Yet who is indifferent; to what; and in what way is poorly understood, and frequently subject to controversy and confusion. This paper proposes a framework for the interpretation and analysis of ethically acceptable forms of indifference in terms of how different states of indifference can be either more or less dynamic, or more or less sensitive to the nature and state of their object.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. added 2014-10-21
    Frank J. Hoffman (2013). “Knowledge and Ethics in Early Buddhism” (Zao Qi Fo Jiao Zhong De Dao De). In Li Lian (ed.), Fo Jiao Yu Dang Dai Wen Hua Jian She Xue Shu Yan Tao Hui Lun Wen Ji (The Collected Papers of "Buddhism and Contemporary Cultural Construction" Conference, Xi'an, China). Northwest University Press (Shi Bei Daxue).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. added 2014-10-21
    Frank J. Hoffman (1996). “Before ‘Post Zen’: A Discussion of Buddhist Ethics”. In D. Z. Phillips (ed.), Religion and Morality (London: Macmillan 1996; New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996). Macmillan and St. Martin's.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. added 2014-10-20
    Italo Testa (2010). La natura del riconoscimento. Riconoscimento naturale e autocoscienza sociale in Hegel. Mimesis.
    My research takes as its guiding thread the statement from Hegel's lectures on the philosophy of spirit of 1805-06, that «cognition is recognition[Erkennen ist Anerkennen]». In this perspective I delineate, first, the consequences of this position for Hegel's epistemology, in particular with reference to the question of skepticism. Then, I show in what sense the recognitive conception of knowledge makes it possible for Hegel to comprehend unitarily, on one hand, cognition as exercise of natural capacities and cognition as exercise of (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. added 2014-10-08
    Sven Nyholm (2014). Lorraine Besser-Jones, Eudaimonic Ethics: The Philosophy and Psychology of Living Well. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.
    Besser-Jones holds that well-being consists in having the experience of satisfying three innate psychological needs at the core of human nature: "relatedness," "autonomy," and "competence." Of these three, the first is the most central one, and we satisfy it by interacting with our fellows in caring and respectful ways: by "acting well." To act well, we need, Besser-Jones argues, a virtuous character: we need certain moral beliefs, and we need those to interact with our intentions in ways that reliably lead (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. added 2014-09-30
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). The Proper Aim of Therapy: Subjective Ends, Objective Goodness, or a Meaningful Life? In Alexander Batthyany, Pninit Russo-Netzer & Stefan Schulenberg (eds.), Meaning in Positive and Existential Psychotherapy (Tentative Title). Zeig, Tucker, and Thiessen Inc. Publishers.
    Therapists tend to hold one of two broad views about how to help their patients. On the one hand, some maintain that the basic point of therapy is to help patients become clear about what they want deep down and to enable them to achieve it by overcoming mental blockages. On the other hand, there are those who contend that the aim of therapy should instead be to enable patients to live objectively good lives, perhaps ones that involve developing their (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. added 2014-09-26
    J. Paul Kelleher (forthcoming). Is There A Sacrifice-Free Solution to Climate Change? Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    John Broome claims that there is a sacrifice-free solution to climate change. He says this is a consequence of elementary economics. After explaining the economic argument in somewhat more detail than Broome, I show that the argument is unsound. A main problem with it stems from Derek Parfit’s “nonidentity effect.” But there is hope, since the nonidentity effect underwrites a more philosophical yet more plausible route to a sacrifice-free solution. So in the end I join Broome in asking economists and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. added 2014-09-26
    J. Paul Kelleher, Efficiency and Equity in Health: Philosophical Considerations. Encyclopedia of Health Economics Vol. 1.
    Efficiency and equity are central concepts for the normative assessment of health policy. Drawing on the work of academic philosophers and philosophically sophisticated economists, this article identifies important philosophical questions implicated by the notions of efficiency and equity and then summarizes influential answers to them. Promising avenues for further philosophical research are also highlighted, especially in the context of health equity and its elusive ethical foundations.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. added 2014-09-24
    Nicholas Maxwell (2014). Global Philosophy: What Philosophy Ought to Be. Imprint Academic.
    These essays are about education, learning, rational inquiry, philosophy, science studies, problem solving, academic inquiry, global problems, wisdom and, above all, the urgent need for an academic revolution. Despite this range and diversity of topics, there is a common underlying theme. Education ought to be devoted, much more than it is, to the exploration real-life, open problems; it ought not to be restricted to learning up solutions to already solved problems - especially if nothing is said about the problems that (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. added 2014-09-24
    Nicholas Maxwell (2014). Global Philosophy: What Philosophy Ought to Be. Imprint Academic.
    These essays are about education, learning, rational inquiry, philosophy, science studies, problem solving, academic inquiry, global problems, wisdom and, above all, the urgent need for an academic revolution. Despite this range and diversity of topics, there is a common underlying theme. Education ought to be devoted, much more than it is, to the exploration real-life, open problems; it ought not to be restricted to learning up solutions to already solved problems - especially if nothing is said about the problems that (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. added 2014-09-22
    Erich Hatala Matthes (forthcoming). Impersonal Value, Universal Value, and the Scope of Cultural Heritage. Ethics.
    Philosophers have used the terms 'impersonal' and 'personal value' to refer to, among others things, whether something's value is universal or particular to an individual. In this paper, I propose an account of impersonal value that, I argue, better captures the intuitive distinction than potential alternatives, while providing conceptual resources for moving beyond the traditional stark dichotomy. I illustrate the practical importance of my theoretical account with reference to debate over the evaluative scope of cultural heritage.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. added 2014-09-22
    Stephen M. Campbell (forthcoming). When the Shape of a Life Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    It seems better to have a life that begins poorly and ends well than a life that begins well and ends poorly. One possible explanation is that the very ‘shape’ of a life can be good or bad for us. If so, this raises a tough question: when can the shape of our lives be good or bad for us? In this essay, I present and critique an argument that the shape of a life is a non-synchronic prudential value—that is, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. added 2014-09-22
    Sven Nyholm (2006). Reason-Based Value or Value-Based Reasons? In Björn Haglund & Helge Malmgren (eds.), Kvantifikator För En Dag. Essays Dedicated to Dag Westerståhl on His Sixtieth Birthday. Philosophical Communications. 193-202.
    In this paper, I discuss practical reasons and value, assuming a coexistence thesis according to which reasons and value always go together. I start by doing some taxonomy, distinguishing among three different ways of accounting for the relation between practical reasons and the good. I argue that, of these views, the most plausible one is that according to which something’s being good just consists in how certain facts about the thing in question – other than that of how it is (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation