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  1. Lucy Allais (2011). Introduction. Philosophical Papers 39 (3):281-287.
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  2. F. E. B. (1960). The Fear of God. Review of Metaphysics 13 (3):529-529.
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  3. Alexander Bain (1859). The Emotions and the Will. D. Appelton.
    ' But, although such a being (a purely intellectual being) might perhaps be conceived to exist, and although, in studying our internal frame, ...
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  4. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (2007). Emotions on the Net. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:31-36.
    Emotions are fascinating phenomena which occupy a pivotal position in our lives. I have presented elsewhere (Ben-Ze'ev, 2000) a comprehensive framework for understanding emotions in our everyday life. The paper briefly describes the characterization of typical emotions, while indicating their relevance to online personal relationships. It discusses issues such as emotional complexity; the typical emotional cause, concern, and object; emotions and intelligence; and managing the emotions. The paper then goes on to examine whether the emotions elicited in online relationships are (...)
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  5. Purushottama Bilimoria (2011). On Grief and Mourning: Thinking a Feeling, Back to Bob Solomon. Sophia 50 (2):281-301.
    The paper considers various ruminations on the aftermath of the death of a close one, and the processes of grieving and mourning. The conceptual examination of how grief impacts on its sufferers, from different cultural perspectives, is followed by an analytical survey of current thinking among psychologists, psychoanalysts and philosophers on the enigma of grief, and on the associated practice of mourning. Robert C. Solomon reflected deeply on the 'extreme emotion' of grief in his extensive theorizing on the emotions, particularly (...)
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  6. Frances Bottenberg (2012). The Self and Its Emotions. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):480-484.
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  7. Matt Bower & Shaun Gallagher (2013). Bodily Affects as Prenoetic Elements in Enactive Perception. Phenomenology and Mind 4 (1):78-93.
    In this paper we attempt to advance the enactive discourse on perception by highlighting the role of bodily affects as prenoetic constraints on perceptual experience. Enactivists argue for an essential connection between perception and action, where action primarily means skillful bodily intervention in one’s surroundings. Analyses of sensory-motor contingencies (as in Noë 2004) are important contributions to the enactive account. Yet this is an incomplete story since sensory-motor contingencies are of no avail to the perceiving agent without motivational pull in (...)
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  8. Talbot Brewer (2011). On Alienated Emotions. In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press
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  9. Malcolm Budd (1991). Hume's Tragic Emotions. Hume Studies 17 (2):93-106.
  10. Douglas Cairns (2007). Philosophy (D.) Konstan The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks. Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature. (Robson Classical Lectures). U. Of Toronto P., 2006. Pp. Xvi + 422. £55. 9780802091031. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:248-.
  11. Jasmina Čelica (2006). David Pugmire, Sound Sentiments: Integrity in the Emotions. Prolegomena 5 (2):276-279.
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  12. Adam B. Cohen, Dacher Keltner & Paul Rozin (2004). Different Religions, Different Emotions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):734-735.
    Atran & Norenzayan (A&N) correctly claim that religion reduces emotions related to existential concerns. Our response adds to their argument by focusing on religious differences in the importance of emotion, and on other emotions that may be involved in religion. We believe that the important differences among religions make it difficult to have one theory to account for all religions.
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  13. John M. Cooper (2005). The Emotional Life of the Wise. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):176-218.
    The ancient Stoics notoriously argued, with thoroughness and force, that all ordinary “emotions” (passions, mental affections: in Greek, pãyh) are thoroughly bad states of mind, not to be indulged in by anyone, under any circumstances: anger, resentment, gloating; pity, sympathy, grief; delight, glee, pleasure; impassioned love (i.e. ¶rvw), agitated desires of any kind, fear; disappointment, regret, all sorts of sorrow; hatred, contempt, schadenfreude. Early on in the history of Stoicism, however, apparently in order to avoid the objection that human nature (...)
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  14. Florian Cova & Julien Deonna (2013). Being Moved. Philosophical Studies (3):1-20.
    In this paper, we argue that, barring a few important exceptions, the phenomenon we refer to using the expression “being moved” is a distinct type of emotion. In this paper’s first section, we motivate this hypothesis by reflecting on our linguistic use of this expression. In section two, pursuing a methodology that is both conceptual and empirical, we try to show that the phenomenon satisfies the five most commonly used criteria in philosophy and psychology for thinking that some affective episode (...)
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  15. Scott Crider (2009). Political Emotions. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):168-172.
  16. Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2008). Shame's Guilt Disproved. Critical Quarterly 50 (4):65-72.
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  17. Ilham Dilman (1989). False Emotions. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 287:287-295.
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  18. Mathieu Doucet (2016). What is the Link Between Regret and Weakness of Will? Philosophical Psychology 29 (3):448-461.
    This paper argues that most contemporary accounts of weakness of will either implicitly or explicitly assume that regret is a typical or even necessary element of standard cases of weakness of will and that this assumption is mistaken. I draw on empirical and philosophical work on self-assessment to show that regret need not accompany typical weak-willed behavior, and that we should therefore revise the dominant account of the difference between weakness of will and changes of mind.
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  19. Donald Dryden (1999). Human Emotions and Evolutionary Homologies. Metascience 8 (1):25-35.
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  20. Travis Dumsday (2007). Review of Wynn's Emotional Experience and Religious Understanding. [REVIEW] Dialogue 46 (04):817-.
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  21. Karl Duncker (1941). On Pleasure, Emotion, and Striving. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1 (June):391-430.
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  22. Andreas Elpidorou (2015). The Significance of Boredom: A Sartrean Reading. In Daniel Dahlstrom, Andreas Elpidorou & Walter Hopp (eds.), Philosophy of Mind and Phenomenology: Conceptual and Empirical Approaches. Routledge
    By examining boredom through the lens of Sartre’s account of the emotions, I argue for the significance of boredom. Boredom matters, I show, for it is both informative and regulatory of one’s behavior: it informs one of the presence of an unsatisfactory situation; and, at the same time, owing to its affective, cognitive, and volitional character, boredom motivates the pursuit of a new goal when the current goal ceases to be satisfactory, attractive, or meaningful. In the absent of boredom, one (...)
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  23. Andreas Elpidorou (2014). The Bright Side of Boredom. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  24. Eva-Maria Engelen, Hans J. Markowitsch, Christian Scheve, Birgitt Roettger-Roessler, Achim Stephan, Manfred Holodynski & Marie Vandekerckhove (2009). Emotions as Bio-Cultural Processes: Discipinary Debates and an Interdisciplinary Outlook. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes.
    The article develops a theoretical framework that is capable of integrating the biological foundations of emotions with their cultural and semantic formation.
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  25. Elaine Fantham (2005). Phthonos D. Konstan, N. K. Rutter (Edd.): Envy, Spite and Jealousy. The Rivalrous Emotions in Ancient Greece . (Edinburgh Leventis Studies 2.) Pp. Xiv + 305. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-7846-1603-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):180-.
  26. Daniel M. Farrell (1981). Book Review:Explaining Emotions Amelie Rorty. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 48 (4):629-.
  27. Alfredo Ferrarin (2006). Retrieving Political Emotion. Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):210-213.
  28. Richard Friemann (2005). Emotional Backing and the Feeling of Deep Disagreement. Informal Logic 25 (1):51-63.
    I discuss Toulmin's (1964) concept of backing with respect to the emotional mode of arguing by examining an example from Fogelin (1985), where emotional backing justifies a warrant concerning when we should judge that a person is being pig-headed. While Fogelin 's treatment is consistent with contemporary emotion science, I show that it needs to be supplemented by therapeutic techniques by comparing an analysis of an emotional argument from Gilbert (1997). The introduction of psychotherapy into argumentation theory raises the question (...)
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  29. Christopher Hamilton (2005). Mark R. Wynn Emotional Experience and Religious Understanding: Integrating Perception, Conception, and Feeling. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005). Pp. XIV+202. £40.00 (Hbk); £16.99 (Pbk). ISBN 0521840562 (Hbk); 0521549892 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 41 (4):475-480.
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  30. Shlomo Hareli & Brian Parkinson (2008). What's Social About Social Emotions? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (2):131–156.
    This paper presents a new approach to the demarcation of social emotions, based on their dependence on social appraisals that are designed to assess events bearing on social concerns. Previous theoretical attempts to characterize social emotions are compared, and their inconsistencies highlighted. Evidence for the present formulation is derived from theory and research into links between appraisals and emotions. Emotions identified as social using our criteria are also shown to bring more consistent consequences for social behavior than nonsocial emotions. We (...)
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  31. Martin Hartmann (2007). Emotionen der Skepsis. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 55 (2):261-288.
    Inwieweit kann die Rolle, die einzelne Emotionen wie Scham, Eifersucht oder Ekel in den Shakespeare-Deutungen Cavells spielen, für eine allgemeinere Theorie der Emotionen fruchtbar gemacht werden? Leitende Annahme ist, dass eine narrative Konstruktion einzelner Emotionen im Kontext eines Selbstverständnisses den ‘direkten Repräsentationalismus’ korrigieren kann, der viele gegenwärtige Emotionstheorien bestimmt. Es geht vor allem um den Nachweis, dass eine Einbettung des Emotionsphänomens in narrativ zu rekonstruierende Selbstverständnisse einhergeht mit einer Neubestimmung der Grundlage der Beurteilung einzelner Emotionen. Cavells Begriff der Anerkennung liefert (...)
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  32. Christoph Hoerl (2015). Tense and the Psychology of Relief. Topoi 34 (1):217-231.
    At the centre of Arthur Prior’s ‘Thank goodness’ argument for the A-theory of time is a particular form of relief. Time must objectively pass, Prior argues, or else the relief felt when a painful experience has ended is not intelligible. In this paper, I offer a detailed analysis of the type of relief at issue in this argument, which I call temporal relief, and distinguish it from another form of relief, which I refer to as counterfactual relief. I also argue (...)
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  33. Bryce Huebner (2011). Genuinely Collective Emotions. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (1):89-118.
    It is received wisdom in philosophy and the cognitive sciences that individuals can be in emotional states but groups cannot. But why should we accept this view? In this paper, I argue that there is substantial philosophical and empirical support for the existence of collective emotions. Thus, while there is good reason to be skeptical about many ascriptions of collective emotion, I argue that some groups exhibit the computational complexity and informational integration required for being in genuinely emotional states.
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  34. Jason Ingram (2009). Political Emotions: Aristotle and the Symphony of Reason and Emotion (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (1):pp. 92-95.
  35. Anne J. Jacobson (2008). Empathy, Primitive Reactions and the Modularity of Emotion. In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press 95-113.
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  36. Rachana Kamtekar (2001). Retrieving Political Emotion: Thumos, Aristotle, and Gender Barbara Koziak University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000, X + 203 Pp., $29.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (04):826-.
  37. Robert A. Kaster (2006). Review of David Konstan, The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks: Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
  38. Kristjá, Kristjá Nsson & N. (2005). Justice and Desert-Based Emotions. Philosophical Explorations 8 (1):53-68.
  39. Kristjá, Kristjá Nsson & N. (2005). Justice and Desert-Based Emotions. Philosophical Explorations 8 (1):53-68.
  40. Kristján Kristjánsson (2010). The Self and its Emotions. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -- What selves are -- Exploring selves -- The emotional self -- Self-concept : self-esteem and self-confidence -- The self as moral character -- Self-respect -- Multicultural selves -- Self-pathologies -- Self-change and self-education.
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  41. Kristján Kristjánsson (2010). The Trouble with Ambivalent Emotions. Philosophy 85 (4):485-510.
    Mixed or ambivalent emotions have long intrigued philosophers. I dissect various putative cases of emotional ambivalence and conclude that the alleged 'psychological problem' surrounding them admits of a solution. That problem has, however, often been conflated with 'moral problem' - of how one should react morally to such ambivalence — which remains active even after the psychological one has been solved. I discuss how the moral problem hits hardest at virtue ethics, old and new. I distinguish between particularist and generalist (...)
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  42. Kristján Kristjánsson (2008). Expendable Emotions. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):5-22.
    Are there any morally expendable emotions? That is, are there any emotions that could ideally, from a moral point of view, be eradicated from human life? Aristotle may have subscribed to the view that there are no such emotions, and for that reason—though not only for that reason—it merits investigation. I first suggest certain revisions of the specifics of Aristotle’s non-expendability claim that render it less counter-intuitive. I then show that the plausibility of Aristotle’s claim turns largely on the question (...)
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  43. Kristján Kristjánsson (2005). Justice and Desert-Based Emotions. Philosophical Explorations 8 (1):53-68.
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  44. Joel J. Kupperman (1997). Felt and Unfelt Emotions: A Rejoinder to Dalgleish. Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):91.
  45. Mark R. Leary, Motivational and Emotional Aspects of the Self.
    Recent theory and research are reviewed regarding self-related motives (self-enhancement, self-verification, and self-expansion) and self-conscious emotions (guilt, shame, pride, social anxiety, and embarrassment), with an emphasis on how these motivational and emotional aspects of the self might be related. Specifically, these motives and emotions appear to function to protect people's social well-being. The motives to self-enhance, self-verify, and self-expand are partly rooted in people's concerns with social approval and acceptance, and self-conscious emotions arise in response to events that have real (...)
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  46. Stephen R. Leighton (1982). Aristotle and the Emotions. Phronesis 27 (1):144-174.
  47. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2006). Evaluating Emotions: What Are the Prospects for a Stoic Revival? Journal of Military Ethics 5 (3):233-240.
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  48. Philip Leon (1935). Morality and the Retributive Emotions. Philosophy 10 (40):441 - 452.
    Just as the pleasant experience differs from the non-pleasant or unpleasant, and the aesthetic from the non-aesthetic, internally or qualitatively, and not merely in degree, or externally or relationally, so, it is natural to expect, a moment of moral living differs from a moral or immoral moment. Indeed, from many quarters, and most emphatically from the Stoic and Christian, we have been wont to hear that if we but leave our sinful or indifferent lives and put on righteousness or goodness, (...)
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  49. Don S. Levi (2000). Elster on the Emotions. Inquiry 43 (3):359-378.
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  50. Sharee N. Light, James A. Coan, Corrina Frye & Richard J. Davidson, Empathy Is Associated With Dynamic Change in Prefrontal Brain Electrical Activity During Positive Emotion in Children.
    Empathy is the combined ability to interpret the emotional states of others and experience resultant, related emotions. The relation between prefrontal electroencephalographic asymmetry and emotion in children is well known. The association between positive emotion (assessed via parent report), empathy (measured via observation), and second-by-second brain electrical activity (recorded during a pleasurable task) was investigated using a sample of one hundred twenty-eight 6- to 10-year-old children. Contentment related to increasing left frontopolar activation (p < .05). Empathic concern and (...)
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